Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Could be useful

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Good grief

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Roger

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Jazz DIspute

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Great

MetaFilter: Migrating cerebral lesions indicate sparganosis

"The patient tested negative for HIV, tuberculosis, lime disease, syphilis, coccidioides, histoplasma and cryptococcus." After four years of MRIs, a person's mysterious headaches, seizures and altered sense of smell and memory are diagnosed as a tapeworm growing throughout his brain.

Slashdot: Great Firewall of China Blocks Edgecast CDN, Thousands of Websites Affected

An anonymous reader writes: Starting about a week ago, The Great Firewall of China began blocking the Edgecast CDN. This was spurred by Great Fire's Collateral Freedom project, which used CDNs to get around censorship of individual domains. It left China with either letting go of censorship, or breaking significant chunks of the Internet for their population. China chose to do the latter, and now many websites are no longer functional for Chinese users. I just helped a friend diagnose this problem with his company's site, so it's likely many people are still just starting to discover what's happened and the economic impact is yet to be fully realized. Hopefully pressure on China will reverse the decision.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hackaday: A 4-bit Computer From Discrete Transistors

Anyone reading this uses computers, and a few very cool people have built their own computer out of chips, [zaphod] is doing something even cooler over on hackaday.io: he’s building a computer from discrete transistors.

Building a computer from individual components without chips isn’t something new - Minecraft players who aren’t into cheaty command blocks do it all the time, and there have been a few real-life builds that have rocked our socks. [zaphod] is following in this hallowed tradition by building a four-bit computer, complete with CPU, RAM, and ROM from transistors, diodes, resistors, wire, and a lot of solder.

The ROM for the computer is just a bunch of 16 DIP switches and 128 diodes, giving this computer 128 bits of storage. the RAM for this project is a bit of a hack – it’s an Arduino, but that’s only because [zaphod] doesn’t want to solder 640 transistors just yet. This setup does have its advantages, though: the entire contents of memory can be dumped to a computer through a serial monitor. The ALU is a 4-bit ripple-carry adder/subtractor, with plans for a comparison unit that will be responsible for JMP.

The project hasn’t been without its problems – the first design of the demux for the ROM access logic resulted in a jungle of wires, gates, and connections that [zaphod] couldn’t get a usable signal out of because of the limited gate fan-out of his gates. After looking at the problem, [zaphod] decided to look at how real demuxes were constructed, and eventually hit upon the correct way of doing things – inverters and ANDs.

It’s a beautiful project, and something that [zaphod] has been working for months on. He’s getting close to complete, if you don’t count soldering up the RAM, and already has a crude Larson scanner worked out.


Filed under: misc hacks

Recent additions: brainfuck-tut 0.5.1.3

Added by alcabrera, Sun Nov 23 05:41:55 UTC 2014.

A simple BF interpreter.

Recent additions: brainfuck-tut 0.5.1.2

Added by alcabrera, Sun Nov 23 05:35:20 UTC 2014.

A simple BF interpreter.

Twitch: BLIND MASSAGE Sees Success At Golden Horse Awards

Lou Ye's Blind Massage won six prizes at last night's Golden Horse awards in Taipei, including Best Feature Film, Best New Performer and Best Adapted Screenplay. Hong Kong's Ann Hui was named Best Director for The Golden Era, while Chen Jian-bin won the Best Actor prize for A Fool and Chen Shiang Chyi won Best Actress for Exit.Regarded as the most prestigious awards ceremony for Chinese language cinema, the Golden Horse awards are now in their 51st year, and were handed out at a star-studded affair last night in the Taiwanese capital. While Blind Massage also collected awards for Best Editing, Best Cinematography and Best Sound Effects, actor Chen Jian-bin enjoyed a fantastic night. He was named Best New Director as well as Best Actor for...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

Recent additions: brainfuck-tut 0.5.1.1

Added by alcabrera, Sun Nov 23 05:30:10 UTC 2014.

A simple BF interpreter.

search.cpan.org: Perl-Critic-Pulp-88

Some add-on policies for Perl::Critic.

Recent additions: brainfuck-tut 0.5.1.0

Added by alcabrera, Sun Nov 23 05:14:08 UTC 2014.

A simple BF interpreter.

search.cpan.org: Test-Simple-1.301001_077

Basic utilities for writing tests.

MetaFilter: "Are we unable to live without a system of walls?"

Racing to Checkpoint Charlie – my memories of the Berlin Wall by Haruki Murakami [The Guardian] The Japanese novelist on why the fall of the Berlin wall has such resonance with his novels.

search.cpan.org: Erlang-Port4-0.04

Erlang External Port (4-bytes packets)

Slashdot: Judge Unseals 500+ Stingray Records

An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from Ars Technica: A judge in Charlotte, North Carolina, has unsealed a set of 529 court documents in hundreds of criminal cases detailing the use of a stingray, or cell-site simulator, by local police. This move, which took place earlier this week, marks a rare example of a court opening up a vast trove of applications made by police to a judge, who authorized each use of the powerful and potentially invasive device According to the Charlotte Observer, the records seem to suggest that judges likely did not fully understand what they were authorizing. Law enforcement agencies nationwide have taken extraordinary steps to preserve stingray secrecy. As recently as this week, prosecutors in a Baltimore robbery case dropped key evidence that stemmed from stingray use rather than fully disclose how the device was used.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








s mazuk: writing an app for self-expression is like writing an encyclopedia for self-expression

writing an app for self-expression is like writing an encyclopedia for self-expression

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Help with Monte Carlo Sim in Racket

Hi, I am doing a monte carlo simulation using intermediate student language in Racket. I cant seem to find the error in my code. I am generating 50 million random points, but cant get more accurate than 3.14, where to my understanding I should get six digits of accuracy. PM for code!

submitted by adetna
[link] [2 comments]

Potz!Blitz!Szpilman!: Theo Botschuiver & Jeffrey Shaw

Theo Botschuiver & Jeffrey Shaw, Airground, 1968

search.cpan.org: App-Tel-0.2004

search.cpan.org: Minion-1.02

Job Queue

Hackaday: Doing Unsafe Things With A Laser Watch

[Pierce Brosnan]-era James Bond had a beautiful Omega wristwatch. Of course as with any Bond gadget, it couldn’t just tell time; it needed to do something else. This watch had a laser, and [Patrick] figured he could replicate this build.

This is apretty normal 1.5W laser diode build, stuffed into a wrist-mountable device that will kill balloons. This is really a watch, though: press a button and this thing will tell time.

In the video below, [Patrick] goes over what damage this watch can do. He manages to pop some black balloons, burn holes in a CD case, light a few matches, cut cellotape, and put tiny burn marks in his wall. The battery won’t last long – just a few minutes – but more than enough to propel [Patrick] into Youtube stardom.

There are no plans or tutorials for the build, but the teardown [Patrick] shows is pretty impressive. To stuff a laser diode, battery, and clock into a watch-sized compartment, [Patrick] needed to turn down the metal buttons to fit everything into his watch case.

Because the comments for this post will invariable fill up with concern trolls, we’re just going to say, yes, this is incredibly unsafe, no one should ever do this, and it probably kills puppies.

 


Filed under: laser hacks

MetaFilter: I'll pass on the stew, thanks

Girls Poop, Too! (SLYT)

MetaFilter: They should've called themselves "West Wings" ...

President Josiah Bartlett, the First Lady, and Chief of Staff Leo McGarry sing "Wonderful Christmastime".

MetaFilter: Show the elephant, in the Bowery, with Mose the Fireboy

Mose the Fireboy , the Bowery B'hoy (and fireman) [via mefi projects]

The Slang of Glance at New York
As I have mentioned, one of the really pleasurable qualities of "Glance at New York" is that it serves as a sort of omnium-gatherum of slang of the era, quite a lot of it from the character Mose, and, presumably, an accurate representation of the Bowery Boy's distinctive cant, called Flash. It's interesting to note that a few of Mose's phrase's read like dialect representation of an Irish accent -- as an example, he says "I'll spile" for "I'll spoil" and says that he's "bilelin' over" for a fight when he means he's "boiling over."
Mose Humphreys, The Inspiration
Just to offer a quick overview, Mose the Fireboy has had several incarnations, and I intend to look at all of them. He was a historic figure named Mose Humphreys, a printer and volunteer fireman. The original Mose became the model for a character named Mose in a play called "A Glance at New York," a slang-slinging, pugilistic butcher-firefighter who then starred in a series of popular plays. The character of Mose was picked up by dime novels, mostly by Ned Buntline, where he was the leader of the street-fighting Bowery B'hoys. He was elevated to a mythic, folkloric figure of tall tales in Herbert Asbury's "Gangs of New York," and, over the course of the 20th century, turned into a sort of tall tale character, like Paul Bunyan. Finally, he was undoubtedly a primary inspiration for Bill the Butcher in the "Gangs of New York," along with William Poole, a butcher and bareknuckle boxer.
Immigrant Fashion: Mose the Fireboy - "Mose was supposed to be a Bowery B'hoy, and so he has a Bowery B'hoy's primary affectations: The top hat and the soap-locks, which, as I have documented elsewhere, was essentially the mid-19th century version of the wet look."
The Modern Era
He still makes occasional appearances. In 2004, author Eric Metaxas and illustrator Everett Peck produced a children's book called "Mose the Fireman," which also offered an audio version with an impressive collection of talent involved: Actor Michael Keaton narrated the story, which may be the first time that the supposedly Irish-American Mose was played by an Irish-American, with music by Steely Dan's Walter Becker.And, as I mentioned at the start of this, the character of Bill the Butcher from Martin Scorsese's "Gangs of New York" borrowed from Mose. The character is almost exclusively credited to the historic figure William Poole, a Bowery B'hoy, butcher, and volunteer fire fighter with a well-known contempt for Irish immigrants.

Instructables: exploring - featured: Make Your Own Gift Tags

Every Christmas here in San Francisco, I inevitably find myself at "Flax" (a local art supplies store), either looking for gifts for friends and family, or more likely looking for gift-wrapping ideas. In December of 2010 I purchased some very nice gift tags there. When I returned a week or two later...
By: po94110

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Recent additions: kdt 0.2.2

Added by giogadi, Sun Nov 23 00:51:24 UTC 2014.

Fast and flexible k-d trees for various types of point queries.

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Modeling Oscillatory Motion Through A Two-Dimensional Discrete Space

Here is a result from a program I've written, which allowed me to model my perception of oscillatory motion through a two dimensional discrete space: http://i.imgur.com/5KlLgEz.gif

submitted by MATHEWSjared
[link] [1 comment]

Slashdot: Samsung Seeking To Block Nvidia Chips From US Market

An anonymous reader writes: Bloomberg reports that Samsung has filed a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission asking them to block the import of Nvidia's graphics chips . This is part of Samsung's retaliation for a similar claim filed by Nvidia against Samsung and Qualcomm back in September. Both companies are wielding patents pertaining to the improved operation of graphics chips in cell phones and other mobile devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hackaday: Serial Surgery Saves Wacom Tablet from Landfill

Years ago, [Greg] got a Wacom Artpad II graphics tablet through Freecycle. What’s the catch, you ask? The stylus was long gone. When he found out how expensive a direct replacement would be, the tablet was laid to rest in his spare parts box. Fast forward a few years to the era of the phone-tablet hybrid and [Greg]‘s subsequent realization that some of them use Wacom stylii. Eight bucks later, he’s in business, except that the tablet is serial. Wacom no longer supports serial tablets, so he had to convert it to USB.

With the help of the WaxBee project and a Teensy 2.0, he would be able to emulate an Intuous2 tablet by sniffing and re-encoding the packets.  Things got a little hairy when he went under the hood to remove the ADM202 TTL-to-RS232 chip with a Dremel—he accidentally gouged some of the pads it sat on as well as a few of the traces. Feeling frustrated, [Greg] took some high-res pictures of the board and posted them to a message board. As it turns out, those pictures helped him recreate the traces and get the tablet running. A little big of glue and tape later, he was in business. [Greg] even gave himself access to reprogram the Teensy.


Filed under: tool hacks

Explosm.net: 11.23.2014

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic.

Computer Science: Theory and Application: [Java] Help with Graph API Implementation

I'm implementing a Graph API for two different "clients." One of them is a trip finder (sort of like google maps) and the other one is a Makefile implementation. I understand that my graph implementation has to be completely independent of each client (i.e. not specific to any functionality of each client). I'm having trouble coming up with the most efficient data structure to use. I've kind of decided I want to use an adjacency list instead of matrix since most usage of graphs require a lot of different vertices, hence by using a list I save myself the cost of resizing every time a new vertex is added. But deciding which list to use is my issue. Since ArrayLists resize every time you remove a node I lose the ability to identify each vertex by an index (which is my intended route). But then a LinkedList might slow down some functionalities. Should I just create a new Vertex data structure that holds an index and maybe a LinkedList that contains each edge? I'm trying to make this as efficient as possible and I just don't want to go down the incorrect path.

Notes:

-I spent about 5 hours last night working on something that looks completely wrong to me this morning.

-Sorry if it's a little hard to understand my english writing isn't so sharp.

-Written in Java

-Thanks!!!!

Edit: spacing.

submitted by catchexception
[link] [13 comments]

programming: A computer algebra system for JavaScript

submitted by dharmatech
[link] [1 comment]

Slashdot: Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

An anonymous reader writes: A new study by researchers at Ohio State University found that dramatically increasing the amount of saturated fat in a person's diet did not increase the amount of saturated fat found in their blood. Professor Jeff Volek, the study's senior author, said it "challenges the conventional wisdom that has demonized saturated fat and extends our knowledge of why dietary saturated fat doesn't correlate with disease." The study also showed that increasing carbohydrates in the diet led to an increase in a particular fatty acid previous studies have linked to heart disease. Volek continued, "People believe 'you are what you eat,' but in reality, you are what you save from what you eat. The point is you don't necessarily save the saturated fat that you eat. And the primary regulator of what you save in terms of fat is the carbohydrate in your diet. Since more than half of Americans show some signs of carb intolerance, it makes more sense to focus on carb restriction than fat restriction."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








programming: Profanity-Laced Academic Paper Exposes Scam International Journal of Advanced Computer Technology

submitted by sproket888
[link] [34 comments]

Slashdot: Ask Slashdot: Best Practices For Starting and Running a Software Shop?

An anonymous reader writes: I'm a systems architect (and a former Unix sysadmin) with many years of experience on the infrastructure side of things. I have a masters in CS but not enough practical exposure to professional software development. I'd like to start my own software product line and I'd like to avoid outsourcing as much as I can. I'm seeking advice on what you think are the best practices for running a software shop and/or good blogs/books on the subject. To be clear, I am not asking about what are the best programming practices or the merits of agile vs waterfall. Rather I am asking more about how to best run the shop as a whole. For example, how important is it to have coding standards and how much standardization is necessary for a small business? What are the pros and cons of allowing different tools and/or languages? What should the ratio of senior programmers to intermediate and junior programmers be and how should they work with each other so that nobody is bored and everyone learns something? Thanks for your help.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Instructables: exploring - featured: Voldemort's wand

Follow these instructions to make your very own... Dark Lord wand. Items You will need:- Polymer clay- Sculpting tools- Microwave oven- Hot glue gun- X-acto knife- Chopsticks- White paper- Assorted paints Base Start off by gluing the paper on the chopstick and rolling the chopstick to make a v...
By: _Cybertooth_

Continue Reading »

the waxing machine: vadime: Magadan, Siberia, 1999 by Leo Erken



vadime:

Magadan, Siberia, 1999 by Leo Erken

Instructables: exploring - featured: Oak Carpenter's Pencil

First step is to get all your ducks in a row. The oak I used is actually trim molding. 1/4 inch thick, 1/2 inch wide with one flat side and then one side the corners are chamfered. This stuff is very affordable, I paid .69 cents a foot at my local big box hardware store. Getting The Lead Out, ...
By: deweymakes

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Hackaday: Solving Arduino’s stk500_getsync() error

[psgarcha] took a year-old Arduino Uno on an international trip and upon returning found something was wrong. Every time he would try to upload, he would get the dreaded avrdude error, ‘stk500_getsync(): not in sync resp=0×00′. The Rx light would blink a few times during the attempted upload, but the tx light did not. Somehow, something was terribly wrong with the ‘duino, and [psgarcha] dug deep to figure out why.

To test the quality of the Arduino’s serial connection, [psgarcha] performed a loopback test; basically a wire plugged into the Tx and Rx pins of the Arduino. Sending a short message through the serial port showed the problem wasn’t the USB cable, the ATmega16u2 on the ‘duino, or any traces on the board. This would require more thought.

The main reason for the error would then be no communication between the computer and the ‘duino, the wrong COM port selected, the wrong board selected in the Arduino text editor, or timing errors or a corrupt bootloader. The first three errors were now out of the question, leaving timing errors and a corrupt bootloader. Troubleshooting then moved on to ordering a new programmer, and still this didn’t work with the broken Uno.

Frustrated with one of the greatest failures to become an Arduino tinkerer, [psgarcha] took a good, long look at the Uno board. He glanced over to an Arduino Mega board. Something looked different. On the Uno, the resonator had blown off. Problem found, at least.

Replacing the blown part with a hilariously large can crystal oscillator, [psgarcha] was back in business. This isn’t how you would fix 99% of getsync() errors, and it’s difficult imagining a situation where a this part would randomly blow, but if you’re ever looking at a nearly intractable problem, you need to start looking at what really shouldn’t fail.

Resonator my fix (1)

Awesome rework, though.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, repair hacks

Computer Science: Theory and Application: ERASMUS - Help choosing University

Hello everyone!

I'm currently in the 4th year of my Masters in CompSci and I'm thinking about going on Erasmus the first semester of the next year (2015/2016). The problem is I have no idea which University I want to go to.

My university (University of Porto in Portugal) has protocols with many European universities and last year the openings for this year (2014/2015) were the following:

  • Austria - Technische Universität Wien
  • Belgium - Universiteit Gent
  • Belgium - Université de Mons
  • Croatia - University of Zagreb (FOI - Faculty of Organization and Informatics)
  • France - École Centrale d'Electronique
  • France - École Nationale Sup. des Mines de Saint Etienne
  • France - Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse
  • Finland - Aalto University School of Science and Technology
  • Germany - Technische Universitat München
  • Germany - Georg Simon Ohm Fachochschule Nümberg
  • Greece - Panepistimio Dytikis Makedonias
  • Hungary - Budapesti Műszaki és Gazdaságtudományi Egyetem
  • Italy - Sapienza Università di Roma (Facoltà di Ingenieria dell' Informazione, Informatica e Statistica)
  • Italy - Università Degli Studi di Ferrara
  • Netherlands - Technische Universiteit Delft (probably not gonna get a spot there since there are only 2 slots and I'm only above average)
  • Poland - Cracow University of Technology
  • Poland - Uniwersytet Lódzki
  • Poland - Wyzsza Szkoła Informatyki i Zarzadzania w Rzeszowie
  • Slovakia
  • Spain - Universitat Politècnica de Cataluña (FIB ‐ Facultat d'Informàtica de Barcelona)
  • Spain - Universidad de Jaén
  • Spain - Universidad Politéncnica de Madrid
  • Spain - Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
  • Spain - Universidad de Santiago de Compostela
  • Spain - Universidad de Sevilla
  • Spain - Universidad Politéncnica de Valencia
  • Spain - Universidad de Zaragoza
  • UK - Coventry University
  • UK - Cranfield University
  • UK - University of Edinburgh

Does anyone have opinions about the Universities here specified?

Thanks in advance!

submitted by ratedrampage
[link] [12 comments]

new shelton wet/dry: And when the groove is dead and gone, yeah, you know that love survives

Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor, known as the “Farewell” Symphony, was composed by Joseph Haydn and dated 1772. […] During the final adagio each musician stops playing, snuffs out the candle on his music stand, and leaves in turn, so that at the end, there are just two muted violins left. { Wikipedia | Continue [...]

Instructables: exploring - featured: It's Christmas soon! Time to make a stylish & unique ADVENT WREATH!

There is a custom here in Germany to have an Advent Wreath on the four weeks before Christmas.On each Sunday in Advent, a further candle is lighted, i.e. one candle on 1st Sunday, two candles on 2nd Sunday, etc.Though being from Christian origin, many non-religious people have Advent Wreaths at home...
By: Ninchen

Continue Reading »

A Tea Addict's Journal » : So about those choices

Well, when buying things there’s never a real “correct” answer. There is always someone who’s willing to buy a beachfront property in Kansas. The first thing you might notice about those choices is that they are largely anonymous – the stuff on the left side are mostly cooked puerh, and the right side are raw. The cooked pu are mostly CNNP wrappers, which doesn’t tell you much of anything. The stuff on the right are named, but only just – they are anonymous named tea cakes, in the sense that nobody would’ve heard of them anyhow. The green big tree you see half of is not the real deal, so it’s more or less the same as a CNNP wrapper.

The prices seem good – quoted in HKD, they are from about 180 to 500, with the 500 actually a cooked cake. The thing is, while these are sort of cheap (for this day and age), they are terrible value. The tea is likely to be bad – of the “this is awful” category. I tried a few of these while looking over these, just for the fun of it, and wouldn’t choose any of them, at any price. The rest – well, if the samples I tried are no good, chances are the others aren’t gems either.

To be honest though, I didn’t need to try to know that these were going to be bad. A few friends have commented to me privately after I posted this photo, basically saying “uh, these are all terrible”. If there’s anything like a general rule, it is that anonymous CNNP wrapper teas are going to be bad – you may find one out of a hundred that’s decent. The rest are just, well, horrible teas that were made in the dog days of the puerh industry, and ever since.

No-name brands like the ones on the right are no better. They are, 99% of the time, bad teas that are no good for aging. Some may be ok for current consumption, if it’s cheap enough and you’re not picky enough. The days of when no-name brand could be decent tea is behind us now – in the early to mid 2000s that may have been possible, because there were so many new outfits that were making tea. Now, however, it is most likely just trash tea that will age into nothingness.

Vendor choices, or lackthereof, is really a problem with buying tea. It is possible to choose a “best” tea within a given selection, yes, so even in this heap of what is basically no good tea, there will be one that seems better than others. It does not, however, mean it is a good idea to buy it – best among a bunch of junk is still junk. Within the online world, it is harder to make that judgement. I think a good way to try though, is to compare across vendors as much as possible. Even then, as I’ve said before, what’s available online is only a small fraction of total teas available in the real world, and much of the best teas never even leave the confines of China simply because the market demand for them is the highest there. The prices that online buyers will be willing to bear is simply not high enough for vendors to realistically bring the best goods to them. So, the pool of available choices are already poisoned, so to speak. Sometimes saying no is the best choice.

Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog: Zélus : A Synchronous Language with ODEs

Zélus : A Synchronous Language with ODEs
Timothy Bourke, Marc Pouzet
2013

Zélus is a new programming language for modeling systems that mix discrete logical time and continuous time behaviors. From a user's perspective, its main originality is to extend an existing Lustre-like synchronous language with Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). The extension is conservative: any synchronous program expressed as data-flow equations and hierarchical automata can be composed arbitrarily with ODEs in the same source code.

A dedicated type system and causality analysis ensure that all discrete changes are aligned with zero-crossing events so that no side effects or discontinuities occur during integration. Programs are statically scheduled and translated into sequential code that, by construction, runs in bounded time and space. Compilation is effected by source-to-source translation into a small synchronous subset which is processed by a standard synchronous compiler architecture. The resultant code is paired with an off-the-shelf numeric solver.

We show that it is possible to build a modeler for explicit hybrid systems à la Simulink/Stateflow on top of an existing synchronous language, using it both as a semantic basis and as a target for code generation.

Synchronous programming languages (à la Lucid Synchrone) are language designs for reactive systems with discrete time. Zélus extends them gracefully to hybrid discrete/continuous systems, to interact with the physical world, or simulate it -- while preserving their strong semantic qualities.

The paper is short (6 pages) and centered around examples rather than the theory -- I enjoyed it. Not being familiar with the domain, I was unsure what the "zero-crossings" mentioned in the introductions are, but there is a good explanation further down in the paper:

The standard way to detect events in a numeric solver is via zero-crossings where a solver monitors expressions for changes in sign and then, if they are detected, searches for a more precise instant of crossing.

The Zélus website has a 'publications' page with more advanced material, and an 'examples' page with case studies.

the waxing machine: aleclikesmacintosh: Microsoft Word 3 1987







aleclikesmacintosh:

Microsoft Word 3 1987

Hackaday: Cloning a Board from Pictures on the Internet

[Andrew] was a pretty cool guy in the early 90s with an awesome keyboard synth that did wavetable synthesis, sampling, a sequencer, and an effects processor. This was a strange era for storage; a reasonable amount of Flash memory was unheard of, and floppy disks ruled the land. [Andrew]‘s synth, though, had the option to connect SCSI drives. Like all optional add ons for high-end equipment, the current price for the Ensoniq SCSI card is astronomical and [Andrew] figured he could build one of these cards himself.

Poking around eBay, [Andrew] found the card in question – just a few passives, some connectors, a voltage regulator, and an odd chip from AMD. This chip was a 33C93A, a SCSI controller, and a trip down the Chinese vendor rabbit hole netted him one for $7. Can’t do better than that.

With the datasheet for the chip in hand and a few reasonable assumptions on how the circuit worked, [Andrew] tried to figure draw the schematic. After doing that, he found another hobbyist that had attempted the same project a few years earlier. All the nets were identical, and all that was left to do was sending a board off to the fab.

A quick trip to Front Panel Express got [Andrew] a mounting bracket for the card, and after plugging it in to the synth revealed a new option – SCSI. It worked, and with an ancient SCSI CD-ROM drive, he had boatloads of offline storage for his synth. Great work, and something we’d love to see more of.

 


Filed under: classic hacks, musical hacks

Planet Haskell: Mark Jason Dominus: Fucking Microsoft, fucking Windows

I have a new Lenovo laptop, which dual-boots Windows and Linux. (Huge thanks to the author of [these detailed instructions](https://askubuntu.com/questions/221835/installing-ubuntu-on-a-pre-installed-windows-8-64-bit-system-uefi-supported/228069#228069) and [this tool](http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair/) that magically fixes whatever is messed up.) So I'm using Windows now for the first time in several years, and remembering why I stopped. I had forgotten, for a long time, what this was like. You hear a lot of propaganda about how a Linux user has to solve a lot of problems that the free development process didn't solve, they have to understand system administration, and when things go wrong you have to depend on free suppprt, the implication being that the free support is sketchy and incomplete. In the intervening years I had forgotten what a load of bullshit this is. When my Linux system was broken, or when the free support was sketch and incomplete, I would wonder if I wouldn't be better off using something else. A few months of dealing with Windows have reminded me that no, I would not be better off. When I first got the laptop, I had Windows booted, and I tried plugging in a VGA monitor for the first time. This is a universal, core function of the laptop, so one might expect them to have gotten it right a long time ago. Or maybe Lenovo tried it thirty minutes after the first laptop came from the factory, and discovered something wrong, and then worked with Microsoft to make sure the problem was fixed. Anyway one would expect to plug in the monitor, and have it just work; whereas under Linux you might expect to have to fiddle with `Xorg.conf`, or download `xrandr` and puzzle out ists man page or something like that. But no, it was just the opposite. When I plugged in the monitor under Linux, everything just worked instantly. When I plugged in the monitor under Windows, Windows recognized the external monitor, but the integrated monitor went black. I tried all the monitor and display settings; the integrated display was still black. So I called Lenovo support. What a mistake that was. The guy on the other end had me try to same set of display settings I had just tried, tried disabling and reinstalling some of the dvice drivers, and then threw up his hand and said I had a bad motherboard and I should return the laptop for replacement. I said I was sure he was mistaken. I knew the motherboard was fine because the VGA monitor worked fine under Linux. (I didn't say this on the phone, because in sometimes the word “Linux” is been like waving a red cape in front of a bull: oh, you use Linux, that must be the cause of your problem.) Then at the end of the call: “Are you satisfied with the results of your call today.” Uh, what? You didn't solve my problem and your suggested solution is obvious nonsense, so, um, no, I'm not satisfied with the results of my call today. Anyway, that's the last time I'll make that mistake. I did some web searching and found a page that suggested some incantation in the boot settings that fixed the problem. So much for paid support; it was worse than useless. More recently, I took the laptop to Los Angeles, and when I arrived, the AC power adapter wasn't working; I would plug in the laptop and it wouldn't charge. Bot Linux and Windows reported "not plugged in". (Lenovo got rid of the LED that announces when AC power is connected, so you have to boot the machine to find out whether it thinks it is plugged in.) This had worked a few hours before, when I had it plugged in at the airport. I tested with a spare line cord and guessed that the power brick was faulty. Then I limped along for two days on reserve battery and a borrowed power brick until a replacement arrived. The replacement worked for a few hours in the office, but when I got back to the hotel, it failed in the same way. Over the next couple of hours I discovered that if I powered the machine down, pulled out and replaced the battery, and then booted it up, the AC power would work indefinitely under Linux, and would even work under Windows _until I logged in_, when it would stop working after a few seconds. Once it stopped working the only way to get it to work again was to power the machine down and pull the battery. So the problem was evidently a Windows software problem. And eventually I made the problem go away by booting with AC power and no battery, uninstalling the Windows battery device driver (yes, the battery as a device driver), shutting down, and booting with battery but no AC power. It has continued to work since. The original power brick, the one I thought had failed, is fine. I wouldn't have imagined that a Windows device driver problem could cause a failure of the AC charging, but it seems so. Had this kind of nonsense happened under Linux, I would have been annoyed but taken it in stride; Linux is written and maintained by volunteers, so you take what you can get. Microsoft has no such excuse. We paid Microsoft a hundred billion dollars for this shoddy shitware.

The Universe of Discourse: Within this instrument, resides the Universe

When opportunity permits, I have been trying to teach my ten-year-old daughter rudiments of algebra and group theory. Last night I posed this problem:

Mary and Sue are sisters. Today, Mary is three times as old as Sue; in two years, she will be twice as old as Sue. How old are they now?

I have tried to teach Ms. 10 that these problems have several phases. In the first phase you translate the problem into algebra, and then in the second phase you manipulate the symbols, almost mechanically, until the answer pops out as if by magic.

There is a third phase, which is pedagogically and practically essential. This is to check that the solution is correct by translating the results back to the context of the original problem. It's surprising how often teachers neglect this step; it is as if a magician who had made a rabbit vanish from behind a screen then forgot to take away the screen to show the audience that the rabbit had vanished.

Ms. 10 set up the equations, not as I would have done, but using four unknowns, to represent the two ages today and the two ages in the future:

$$\begin{align} MT & = 3ST \\ MY & = 2SY \\ \end{align} $$

( here is the name of a single variable, not a product of and ; the others should be understood similarly.)

“Good so far,” I said, “but you have four unknowns and only two equations. You need to find two more relationships between the unknowns.” She thought a bit and then wrote down the other two relations:

$$\begin{align} MY & = MT + 2 \\ SY & = ST + 2 \end{align} $$

I would have written two equations in two unknowns:

$$\begin{align} M_T & = 3S_T\\ M_T+2 & = 2(S_T + 2) \end{align} $$

but one of the best things about mathematics is that there are many ways to solve each problem, and no method is privileged above any other except perhaps for reasons of practicality. Ms. 10's translation is different from what I would have done, and it requires more work in phase 2, but it is correct, and I am not going to tell her to do it my way. The method works both ways; this is one of its best features. If the problem can be solved by thinking of it as a problem in two unknowns, then it can also be solved by thinking of it as a problem in four or in eleven unknowns. You need to find more relationships, but they must exist and they can be found.

Ms. 10 may eventually want to learn a technically easier way to do it, but to teach that right now would be what programmers call a premature optimization. If her formulation of the problem requires more symbol manipulation than what I would have done, that is all right; she needs practice manipulating the symbols anyway.

She went ahead with the manipulations, reducing the system of four equations to three, then two and then one, solving the one equation to find the value of the single remaining unknown, and then substituting that value back to find the other unknowns. One nice thing about these simple problems is that when the solution is correct you can see it at a glance: Mary is six years old and Sue is two, and in two years they will be eight and four. Ms. 10 loves picking values for the unknowns ahead of time, writing down a random set of relations among those values, and then working the method and seeing the correct answer pop out. I remember being endlessly delighted by almost the same thing when I was a little older than her. In The Dying Earth Jack Vance writes of a wizard who travels to an alternate universe to learn from the master “the secret of renewed youth, many spells of the ancients, and a strange abstract lore that Pandelume termed ‘Mathematics.’”

“I find herein a wonderful beauty,” he told Pandelume. “This is no science, this is art, where equations fall away to elements like resolving chords, and where always prevails a symmetry either explicit or multiplex, but always of a crystalline serenity.”

After Ms. 10 had solved this problem, I asked if she was game for something a little weird, and she said she was, so I asked her:

Mary and Sue are sisters. Today, Mary is three times as old as Sue; in two years, they will be the same age. How old are they now?

“WHAAAAAT?” she said. She has a good number sense, and immediately saw that this was a strange set of conditions. (If they aren't the same age now, how can they be the same age in two years?) She asked me what would happen. I said (truthfully) that I wasn't sure, and suggested she work through it to find out. So she set up the equations as before and worked out the solution, which is obvious once you see it: Both girls are zero years old today, and zero is three times as old as zero. Ms. 10 was thrilled and delighted, and shared her discovery with her mother and her aunt.

There are some powerful lessons here. One is that the method works even when the conditions seem to make no sense; often the results pop out just the same, and can sometimes make sense of problems that seem ill-posed or impossible. Once you have set up the equations, you can just push the symbols around and the answer will emerge, like a familiar building as you approach it through a fog.

But another lesson, only hinted at so far, is that mathematics has its own way of understanding things, and this is not always the way that humans understand them. Goethe famously said that whatever you say to mathematicians, they immediately translate it into their own language and then it is something different; I think this is exactly what he meant.

In this case it is not too much of a stretch to agree that Mary is three times as old as Sue when they are both zero years old. But in the future I plan to give Ms. 10 a problem that requires Mary and Sue to have negative ages—say that Mary is twice as old as Sue today, but in three years Sue will be twice as old—to demonstrate that the answer that pops out may not be a reasonable one, or that the original translation into mathematics can lose essential features of the original problem. The solution that says that is mathematically irreproachable, and if the original problem had been posed as “Find two numbers such that…” it would be perfectly correct. But translated back to the original context of a problem that asks about the ages of two sisters, the solution is unacceptable. This is the point of the joke about the spherical cow.

Planet Haskell: Mark Jason Dominus: Within this instrument, resides the Universe

When opportunity permits, I have been trying to teach my ten-year-old daughter rudiments of algebra and group theory. Last night I posed this problem:

Mary and Sue are sisters. Today, Mary is three times as old as Sue; in two years, she will be twice as old as Sue. How old are they now?

I have tried to teach Ms. 10 that these problems have several phases. In the first phase you translate the problem into algebra, and then in the second phase you manipulate the symbols, almost mechanically, until the answer pops out as if by magic.

There is a third phase, which is pedagogically and practically essential. This is to check that the solution is correct by translating the results back to the context of the original problem. It's surprising how often teachers neglect this step; it is as if a magician who had made a rabbit vanish from behind a screen then forgot to take away the screen to show the audience that the rabbit had vanished.

Ms. 10 set up the equations, not as I would have done, but using four unknowns, to represent the two ages today and the two ages in the future:

$$\begin{align} MT & = 3ST \\ MY & = 2SY \\ \end{align} $$

( here is the name of a single variable, not a product of and ; the others should be understood similarly.)

“Good so far,” I said, “but you have four unknowns and only two equations. You need to find two more relationships between the unknowns.” She thought a bit and then wrote down the other two relations:

$$\begin{align} MY & = MT + 2 \\ SY & = ST + 2 \end{align} $$

I would have written two equations in two unknowns:

$$\begin{align} M_T & = 3S_T\\ M_T+2 & = 2(S_T + 2) \end{align} $$

but one of the best things about mathematics is that there are many ways to solve each problem, and no method is privileged above any other except perhaps for reasons of practicality. Ms. 10's translation is different from what I would have done, and it requires more work in phase 2, but it is correct, and I am not going to tell her to do it my way. The method works both ways; this is one of its best features. If the problem can be solved by thinking of it as a problem in two unknowns, then it can also be solved by thinking of it as a problem in four or in eleven unknowns. You need to find more relationships, but they must exist and they can be found.

Ms. 10 may eventually want to learn a technically easier way to do it, but to teach that right now would be what programmers call a premature optimization. If her formulation of the problem requires more symbol manipulation than what I would have done, that is all right; she needs practice manipulating the symbols anyway.

She went ahead with the manipulations, reducing the system of four equations to three, then two and then one, solving the one equation to find the value of the single remaining unknown, and then substituting that value back to find the other unknowns. One nice thing about these simple problems is that when the solution is correct you can see it at a glance: Mary is six years old and Sue is two, and in two years they will be eight and four. Ms. 10 loves picking values for the unknowns ahead of time, writing down a random set of relations among those values, and then working the method and seeing the correct answer pop out. I remember being endlessly delighted by almost the same thing when I was a little older than her. In The Dying Earth Jack Vance writes of a wizard who travels to an alternate universe to learn from the master “the secret of renewed youth, many spells of the ancients, and a strange abstract lore that Pandelume termed ‘Mathematics.’”

“I find herein a wonderful beauty,” he told Pandelume. “This is no science, this is art, where equations fall away to elements like resolving chords, and where always prevails a symmetry either explicit or multiplex, but always of a crystalline serenity.”

After Ms. 10 had solved this problem, I asked if she was game for something a little weird, and she said she was, so I asked her:

Mary and Sue are sisters. Today, Mary is three times as old as Sue; in two years, they will be the same age. How old are they now?

“WHAAAAAT?” she said. She has a good number sense, and immediately saw that this was a strange set of conditions. (If they aren't the same age now, how can they be the same age in two years?) She asked me what would happen. I said (truthfully) that I wasn't sure, and suggested she work through it to find out. So she set up the equations as before and worked out the solution, which is obvious once you see it: Both girls are zero years old today, and zero is three times as old as zero. Ms. 10 was thrilled and delighted, and shared her discovery with her mother and her aunt.

There are some powerful lessons here. One is that the method works even when the conditions seem to make no sense; often the results pop out just the same, and can sometimes make sense of problems that seem ill-posed or impossible. Once you have set up the equations, you can just push the symbols around and the answer will emerge, like a familiar building as you approach it through a fog.

But another lesson, only hinted at so far, is that mathematics has its own way of understanding things, and this is not always the way that humans understand them. Goethe famously said that whatever you say to mathematicians, they immediately translate it into their own language and then it is something different; I think this is exactly what he meant.

In this case it is not too much of a stretch to agree that Mary is three times as old as Sue when they are both zero years old. But in the future I plan to give Ms. 10 a problem that requires Mary and Sue to have negative ages—say that Mary is twice as old as Sue today, but in three years Sue will be twice as old—to demonstrate that the answer that pops out may not be a reasonable one, or that the original translation into mathematics can lose essential features of the original problem. The solution that says that is mathematically irreproachable, and if the original problem had been posed as “Find two numbers such that…” it would be perfectly correct. But translated back to the original context of a problem that asks about the ages of two sisters, the solution is unacceptable. This is the point of the joke about the spherical cow.

Perlsphere: Inside look at TPF's budget process

It hasn't always been the case that The Perl Foundation has much of a budget to speak of. There were many early years that we flew by the seat of our pants. "Is it in the budget" was more or less the same as asking "what's left in the bank account?" But, as the foundation has grown up, so have our business and accounting practices.

First, it is helpful to know that The Perl Foundation has an accountant and bookkeeper that we work with in order to prepare our taxes, keep our records straight, and to help out with the interesting accounting questions that come along with running a charitable foundation. Everything that we do is tracked using commonly accepted standard accounting practices by an independent, licensed accountant.

So, what's up with this mysterious TPF budget anyway? How does it all work? As with everything else, it starts with the Perl community. The leaders of TPF do their best to listen to the community. We try to feel out what the needs are. We also solicit feedback to determine the attitude on existing programs: do the members of the community favor what we are doing? Have the programs been successful? What needs adjusted?

Next, the Treasurer reaches out to the Chairpeople of TPF's committees: Community Advocacy, Conferences, Marketing, Grants, and Steering. They needs to write up their plans for the coming year. They need to explain what they want to do, and how much it will cost.

Once all of that is done, the Treasurer meets with the President to get feedback on her visions for the upcoming year. The feedback that has been received and various committee requests are discussed. There are also program that operate outside of a specific committee (for example, the Outreach Program for Women.) All of this must be considered in detail in order to formulate both a reasonable set of objectives for the upcoming year and a matching budget. The outcome is a draft plan for the following year.

Finally, the draft plan is sent along to The Perl Foundation's Board of Directors. The Board reviews the recommendations, makes adjustments as they deem necessary, and ultimately approves the final budget.

Once the budget has been approved, each chairperson has the discretion to spend their budget on the items they had initially requested (within a few limitations and guidelines.)

The budgets can get a little complicated due to the way we handle fund accounting: We have a general fund that handle a majority of our operations. We also operate separate funds for the Ian Hague grants and the Perl 5 Core grants. So, each of those need to be budgeted separately.

We also operate separate custodial funds for the various Perl workshops that associate with us. But since TPF's money typically does not flow in or out of the Perl workshops, we do not budget those.

The entire process takes about three months to complete. Requests from Chairpeople were due today. We expect to have the 2015 budget final by early January.

Re: Factor: Factor Tutorial

Andrea Ferretti has posted a great tutorial about Factor!

From the announcement on the mailing list:

Factor has a lot of documentation in the listener, but I have
tried to cover some topics that are present in the official
docs, but scattered throughout it, so that they were not clear
to me at the beginning.

These include for instance:

- the central concept is function composition, the stack is more
of a detail
- how simple is to deploy program and scripts
- what tools are there: linter, inspector, unit testing support,
reverse lookup of function uses...
- what model of multithreading and async I/O are used
- how to make use of multiple cores
- in what sense Factor has an object system
and more

Check it out!

Twitch: OJUJU: Watch The Trailer For The Nigerian Zombie Film

Despite being made with virtually no budget and minimal resources in extremely trying conditions, writer-director CJ Obasi's Ojuju emerged from the recent African International Film Festival in Calabar with the Best Nigerian Film prize ahead of many much higher budgeted efforts from more established directors. Why? Because while Obasi may not have had much to work with he's got plain old raw talent. We ran a review of the film yesterday and today we share the official trailer. And, yes, you can definitely see some of the technical limitations in there but you can also see a fair bit of what makes Obasi a talent to watch. Take a look below....

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

programming: The Art of Writing Software

submitted by infinitus_
[link] [99 comments]

Twitch: Cinema One 2014 Review: Dodo Dayao's VIOLATOR Is A Masterful Exercise In Mounting Dread

A storm is coming and its bringing with it to Manila a rapidly escalating sense of dread. There would be panic, perhaps, were there any outlet for such an emotion but with the city on lockdown as water levels rise there is simply no opportunity for such a thing. Instead it brings with it anxiety of a sweaty, feral intensity and the sense that the entire city is simply stewing in its own sins and that those sins will soon consume all.Filipino blogger and critic Dodo Dayao makes his feature debut with Violator, a gorgeously executed and tightly controlled exercise in religious dread. It is a film that takes very seriously the notion that evil is all around and within us. Like Brillante Mendoza's Sapi...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

Twitch: Watch: Lovecraftian Short Film ETHEREAL CHRYSALIS

The Lovecraftian inspired short film Ethereal Chrysalis by Montreal based filmmaker Syl Disjonk is now available online for everyone who needs a little something to fuel their nightmares. Ethereal Chrysalis enjoyed lengthy run on the international film festival circuit. I first saw it a couple of years ago at Morbido where Disjonk took home a Silver Sugar Skull for an Audience Award. Falls into a nightmare where the inter-dimensional cosmic order is consumed by dementia. Leave your mind in the ethereal labyrinth of madness where the doors of perception become the annihilation of all rational thought. Accept the call of the Ethereal Chrysalis.There really are not any words that can accurately describe what you are about to see. Take that image above for example. That! For ten minutes!...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

programming: How to reward skilled coders with something other than people management

submitted by sidcool1234
[link] [46 comments]

OCaml Planet: Andrej Bauer: A HoTT PhD position in Ljubljana

I am looking for a PhD student in mathematics. Full tuition & stipend will be provided for a period of three years, which is also the official length of the programme. The topic of research is somewhat flexible and varies from constructive models of homotopy type theory to development of a programming language for a proof assistant based on dependent type theory, see the short summary of the Effmath project for a more detailed description.

The candidate should have as many of the following desiderata as possible, and at the very least a master’s degree (or an equivalent one):

  1. a master’s degree in mathematics, with good knowledge of computer science
  2. a master’s degree in computer science, with good knowledge of mathematics
  3. experience with functional programming
  4. experience with proof assistants
  5. familiarity with homotopy type theory

The student will officially enrol in October 2014 at the University of Ljubljana. No knowledge of Slovene is required. However, it is possible, and even desirable, to start with the actual work (and stipend) earlier, as soon as in the spring of 2015. The candidates should contact me by email as soon as possible. Please include a short CV and a statement of interest.

Electronics-Lab.com Blog: Industrial applications rely on the EA DOG displays

obr1459_1

 

Minimal power consumption, slim design and a big amount of available versions with multi-color backlight – these are some benefits of the EADOG series displays.

EADOG series is familiar to many of you and probably it´s your favorite one from these main reasons:

  • displays are unusually flat (thin)
  • the have a very low power consumption of 100-s uA (without backlight)
  • wide possibilities of backlight, monochrome and also RGB
  • some types are well legible even without backlight
  • simple communication through 4/8 bit or SPI interface and newly even I2C

So far, types with up to 128x64px or 3×16 characters were available. The most recent additions to the EADOG family are bigger types with resolution of 160x104px (EADOGXL160), 240x64px (EADOGM240), 240x128px (EADOGXL240) and 4×20 characters (EADOGM204) and appropriate backlight modules EALED66x40, EALED94x40 and EALED94x67. Also these new types maintain a low profile – only 5.8 or 6.5mm with backlighting. A positivity is that even these new types are based on standard LCD controllers.

A guide at a choice of a suitable combination of display +backlight will provide you the application described in our article – Start with the EA DOG displays for free.

Detailed information will provide you the datasheets at particular types.

Industrial applications rely on the EA DOG displays - [Link]

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Is this graph problem NP-Hard?

Given a graph G=(V, E), a subset S of V of size k, and a positive integer l. Can one build k vertices-disjoint paths, each path starts in a different vertex from S, and each path is l vertices long?

An exponential time algorithm for this problem can be found easily with a naive approach. But could I ever find a polynomial solution, or the problem is NP-Hard? (And then NP-Complete, since obviously some k candidates for the paths could be checked in polynomial time for correctness)

This problem was actually raised from a real world problem. So if it is NP-Hard, a heuristic solution will be needed.

My guess is that the problem is indeed NP-Hard. I think that even for d = 1 it's NP-Hard. In that case, the problem can be rephrased as "given a set S and k subsets of S – S_1,…,S_k. Can we find k different elements a_1,..,a_k s.t s_i is in S_i ?"

I tried to build a reduction from 3-SAT to the last problem, but things didn't work out. Is it actually an easy problem? Is it just a variant of Hall's marriage theorem? Can Hall's theorem be extended to the general l problem? edit: typo fixed

submitted by guy_gold
[link] [3 comments]

Electronics-Lab.com Blog: EEVblog #685 – What Is Oscilloscope AC Trigger Coupling?

In this tutorial Dave describes what AC trigger coupling is on an oscilloscope and why it can be useful. Not only on old analog CRT oscilloscopes, but modern digital scopes as well.
How and why is it different to AC channel input coupling?
Also, use of the 50% trigger control, and how the venerable DS1052E is still more usable than the new DS1054Z.

EEVblog #685 – What Is Oscilloscope AC Trigger Coupling? - [Link]

Bad Science: That YouGov parlour game is wrong. This annoys me.

Electronics-Lab.com Blog: Why diodes are used around relay coils

by w2aew @ youtube.com:

Today’s “Back to Basics” tutorial topic – why flyback or snubber diodes are used around relay coils when switched or controlled by low power electronics. We’ll talk about how and why dangerously high voltages can be generated from the collapse of the stored magnetic energy in the coil when they’re switched off, and how the diode can protect the low power electronics from being damaged by these high voltages. Some voltage and current measurements are made on an actual circuit to see the real-world effects.

Why diodes are used around relay coils - [Link]

Electronics-Lab.com Blog: Interfacing a cheap phone camera module to a PIC32 microcontroller

Interfacing a cheap phone camera module to a PIC32 microcontroller – [Link]

Electronics-Lab.com Blog: 3 Tone Siren

3_TONE_SIREN_PIC

3 Tone Siren project produces Gun Sound, Police Siren and Ambulance Siren effects from a speaker. This project is built around UM3561 IC driving an LM386 audio amplifier to give that extra punch.

3 Tone Siren - [Link]

s mazuk: Photo



Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal (updated daily): November 22, 2014


POW!

Potz!Blitz!Szpilman!: Vladimír Havlík

Vladimír Havlík, Dwelling, 1978

Instructables: exploring - featured: Light Up Your Head

The joke goes like this: if you want to make something Steampunk, add gears; if you want to make it CRASHspace, add LEDs.If you know me, you know that I wear bandanas always. I have several dozen (seriously, see the picture in step 1). When it comes time for events like Two Bit Circus' STEAM Carniva...
By: ohhmyhead

Continue Reading »

programming: Cache is the new RAM

submitted by based2
[link] [118 comments]

Planet Haskell: The GHC Team: GHC Weekly News - 2014/11/21

Hi *,

To get things back on track, we have a short post following up the earlier one this week. It's been busy today so I'll keep it short:

  • The STABLE freeze Austin announced two weeks ago is happening now, although at this point a few things we wanted to ship are just 98% ready. So it may wait until Monday.
  • HEAD has been very busy the past two days as many things are now trying to merge as closely to the window as possible. Some notes follow.
  • HEAD now has support for using the 'deriving' clause for arbitrary classes (see #5462).
  • HEAD now has 64bit iOS and SMP support for ARM64, thanks to Luke Iannini. See #7942.
  • base now exports a new module for Natural numbers called Numeric.Natural following Herbert Valerio Riedel's recent proposal.
  • Your author has been busy and delayed due to some bad travel experiences the past week, so the 7.8.4 RC1 hasn't landed this past week. Hopefully it will be out by the end of this week still.

Since the last update was only a few days ago, you'd think we haven't closed a lot of tickets, but we have! Thomas Miedema has been very very persistent about closing tickets and cleaning them up, which is greatly appreciated: #9810, #8324, #8310, #9396, #9626, #9776, #9807, #9698, #7942, #9703, #8584, #8968, #8174, #9812, #9209, #9220, #9151, #9201, #9318, #9109, #9126, #8406, #8102, #8093, #8085, #8068, #8094, #9590, #9368, #2526, #9569, #8149, #9815, #5462, #9647, #8568, #9293, #7484, #1476, #9824, #9628, #7942

Twitch: Morbido Fest 2014 Review: FEED THE LIGHT, Beware The Sparkling Dust

Never separate a mother from her child. Sara is torn away from her daughter Jenny in the opening minutes of Feed the Light, a new film by Swedish director Henrik Möller that teeters between bad dreams and outright nightmares. Still furious, and learning that her ex-husband Jon has taken Jenny to an unmarked building, Sara gains access with her trusty knife -- and promptly finds herself in a job interview. The building is a subterranean world of long hallways and tiny offices and cramped rooms. As a puzzled Sara (Lina Sunden) answers a few brief questions from a straitlaced businesswoman (Jenny Lampa), a naked man cowers under a blanket in the corner, whimpering like a dog for no apparent reason. When Sara is given the...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

Explosm.net: 11.22.2014

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic.

Planet Haskell: Danny Gratzer: Bidirectional Type Checkers for λ→ and λΠ

Posted on November 22, 2014

This week I learned that my clever trick for writing a type checker actually has a proper name: bidirectional type checking. In this post I’ll explain what exactly that is and we’ll use it to write a few fun type checkers.

First of all, let’s talk about one of the fundamental conflicts when designing a statically typed language: how much information need we demand from the user? Clearly we can go too far in either direction. Even people who are supposedly against type inference support at least some inference. I’m not aware of a language that requires you to write something like

my_function((my_var : int) + (1 : int) : int) : string

Clearly inferring the types of some expressions are necessary. On the other hand, if we leave out all type annotations then it becomes a lot harder for a human reader to figure out what’s going on! I at least, need to see signatures for top level functions or I become grumpy.

So inside a type checker we always have two sort of processes

  1. I know this must have the type T, I’ll check to make sure this is the case
  2. I have no idea what the type of this expression is, I’ll examine the expression to figure it out

In a bidirectional type checker, we acknowledge these two phases by explicitly separating the type checker into two functions

    inferType :: Expr -> Maybe Type
    checkType :: Type -> Expr -> Maybe ()

Our type checker thus has two directions, one where we use the type to validate the expression (the type flows in) or we synthesize the type form the expression (the type flows out). That’s all that this is!

It turns out that a technique like this is surprisingly robust. It handles everything from subtyping to simple dependent types! To see how this actually plays out I think it’d be best to just dive in and do something with it.

Laying Out Our Language

Now when we’re building a bidirectional type checker we really want our AST to explicitly indicate inferrable vs checkable types. Clearly the parser might not care so much about this distinction, but prior to type checking it’s helpful to create this polarized tree.

For a simple language you can imagine

    data Ty = Bool
            | Arr Ty Ty
            deriving(Eq, Show)

    data IExpr = Var Int
               | App IExpr CExpr
               | Annot CExpr Ty
               | If CExpr IExpr IExpr
               | ETrue
               | EFalse

    data CExpr = Lam CExpr
               | CI IExpr

This is just simply typed lambda calculus with booleans. We’re using DeBruijn indices so we need not specify a variable for Lam. The IExpr type is for expressions we can infer types for, while CExpr is for types we can check.

Much this isn’t checking, we can always infer the types of variables, inferring the types of lambdas is hard, etc. Something worth noting is CI. For any inferrable type, we can make it checkable by inferring a type and checking that it’s equal to what we expected. This is actually how Haskell works, GHC is just inferring type without bothering with your signature and then just checks you were right in the first place!

Now that we’ve separated out our expressions, we can easily define our type checker.

    type Env = [Ty]

    (?!) :: [a] -> Int -> Maybe a
    xs ?! i = if i < length xs then Just (xs !! i) else Nothing

    inferType :: Env -> IExpr -> Maybe Ty
    inferType env (Var i) = env ?! i
    inferType env (App l r) =
      case inferType env l of
       Just (Arr lTy rTy) -> checkType env r lTy >> return rTy
       _ -> Nothing
    inferType env (Annot e an) = checkType env e an >> return an
    inferType _ ETrue = return Bool
    inferType _ EFalse = return Bool
    inferType env (If i t e) = do
      checkType env i Bool
      lTy <- inferType env t
      rTy <- inferType env e
      guard (lTy == rTy)
      return lTy

    checkType :: Env -> CExpr -> Ty -> Maybe ()
    checkType env (Lam ce) (Arr l r) = checkType (l : env) ce r
    checkType env (CI e) t = inferType env e >>= guard . (t ==)
    checkType _ _ _ = Nothing

So our type checker doesn’t have many surprises in it. The environment is easy to maintain since DeBruijn indices are easily stored in a list.

Now that we’ve seen how a bidirectional type checker more or less works, let’s kick it up a notch.

Type Checking Dependent Types

Type checking a simple dependently typed language is actually not nearly as bad as you’d expect. The first thing to realize is that since dependent types have only one syntactic category.

We maintain the distinction between inferrable and checkable values, resulting in

    data IExpr = Var Int
               | App IExpr CExpr
               | Annot CExpr CExpr
               | ETrue
               | EFalse
               | Bool
               | Star -- New stuff starts here
               | Pi CExpr CExpr
               | Const String
               | Free Int
               deriving (Eq, Show, Ord)

    data CExpr = Lam CExpr
               | CI IExpr
               deriving (Eq, Show, Ord)

So you can see we’ve added 4 new expressions, all inferrable. Star is just the kind of types as it is in Haskell. Pi is the dependent function type, it’s like Arr, except the return type can depend on the supplied value.

For example, you can imagine a type like

    replicate :: (n : Int) -> a -> List n a

Which says something like “give me an integer n and a value and I’ll give you back a list of length n”.

Interestingly, we’ve introduce constants. These are necessary simply because without them this language is unbelievable boring. Constants would be defined in the environment and they represent constant, irreducible terms. You should think of them almost like constructors in Haskell. For example, one can imagine that 3 constants

    Nat :: Star
    Zero :: Nat
    Succ :: (_ : Nat) -> Nat

Which serve to define the natural numbers.

Last but not least, we’ve added “free variables” as an explicit

Now an important piece of a type checker is comparing types for equality, in STLC, equivalent types are syntactically equal so that was solved with deriving Eq. Here we need a bit more subtlety. Indeed, now we need to check arbitrary expressions for equality! This is hard. We’ll reduce things as much as possible and then just check syntactic equality. This means that if True then a else b would equal a as we’d hope, but \x -> if x then a else a wouldn’t.

Now in order to facilitate this check we’ll define a type for fully reduced expressions. Since we’re only interested in checking equality on these terms we can toss the inferrable vs checkable division out the window.

    data VConst = CAp VConst Val
                | CVar String
                | CFree Int

    data Val = VStar
             | VBool
             | VTrue
             | VFalse
             | VConst VConst
             | VArr Val Val
             | VPi Val (Val -> Val)
             | VLam (Val -> Val)
             | VGen Int

Now since we have constants we can have chains of application that we can’t reduce, that’s what VConst is. Notice that this handles the case of just having a constant nicely.

The value dichotomy uses a nice trick from the “Simple Easy!” paper, we use HOAS to have functions that reduce themselves when applied. The downside of this is that we need VGen to peek inside the now opaque VLam and VPi. The idea is we’ll generate a unique Int and apply the functions to VGen i.

Now in order to conveniently generate these fresh integers I used monad-gen (it’s not self promotion if it’s useful :). Equality checking comes to

    -- *Whistle and fidget with hands*
    instance Enum Val where
      toEnum = VGen
      fromEnum _ = error "You're a bad person."

    eqTerm :: Val -> Val -> Bool
    eqTerm l r = runGen $ go l r
      where go VStar VStar = return True
            go VBool VBool = return True
            go VTrue VTrue = return True
            go VFalse VFalse = return True
            go (VArr f a) (VArr f' a') = (&&) <$> go f f' <*> go a a'
            go (VLam f) (VLam g) = gen >>= \v -> go (f v) (g v)
            go (VPi f) (VPi g) = gen >>= \v -> go (f v) (g v)
            go (VGen i) (VGen j) = return (i == j)
            go (VConst c) (VConst c') = case (c, c') of
              (CVar v, CVar v') -> return (v == v')
              (CAp f a, CAp f' a') ->
                (&&) <$> go (VConst f) (VConst f') <*> go a a'
              _ -> return False
            go _ _ = return False

Basically we just recurse and return true or false at the leaves.

Now that we know how to check equality of values, we actually need to map terms into those values. This involves basically writing a little interpreter.

    inf :: [Val] -> IExpr -> Val
    inf _ ETrue = VTrue
    inf _ EFalse = VFalse
    inf _ Bool = VBool
    inf _ Star = VStar
    inf _ (Free i) = VConst (CFree i)
    inf _ (Const s) = VConst (CVar s)
    inf env (Annot e _) = cnf env e
    inf env (Var i) = env !! i
    inf env (Pi l r) = VPi (cnf env l) (\v -> cnf (v : env) r)
    inf env (App l r) =
      case inf env l of
       VLam f -> f (cnf env r)
       VConst c -> VConst . CAp c $ cnf env r
       _ -> error "Impossible: evaluated ill-typed expression"

    cnf :: [Val] -> CExpr -> Val
    cnf env (CI e) = inf env e
    cnf env (Lam c) = VLam $ \v -> cnf (v : env) c

The interesting cases are for Lam, Pi, and App. For App we actually do reductions wherever we can, otherwise we know that we’ve just got a constant so we slap that on the front. Lam and Pi are basically the same, they wrap the evaluation of the body in a function and evaluate it based on whatever is fed in. This is critical, otherwise App’s reductions get much more complicated.

We need one final thing. You may have noticed that all Val’s are closed, there’s no free DeBruijn variables. This means that when we go under a binder we can’t type check open terms since we’re representing types as values and the term we’re checking shares variables with its type.

This means that our type checker when it goes under a binder is going to substitute the now free variable for a fresh Free i. Frankly, this kinda sucks. I poked about for a better solution but this is what “Simple Easy!” does too..

To do these substitutions we have

    ibind :: Int -> IExpr -> IExpr -> IExpr
    ibind i e (Var j) | i == j = e
    ibind i e (App l r) = App (ibind i e l) (cbind i e r)
    ibind i e (Annot l r) = Annot (cbind i e l) (cbind i e r)
    ibind i e (Pi l r) = Pi (cbind i e l) (cbind i e r)
    ibind _ _ e  = e -- Non recursive cases

    cbind :: Int -> IExpr -> CExpr -> CExpr
    cbind i e (Lam b) = Lam (cbind (i + 1) e b)
    cbind i e (CI c) = CI (ibind i e c)

This was a bit more work than I anticipated, but now we’re ready to actually write the type checker!

Since we’re doing bidirectional type checking, we’re once again going to have two functions, inferType and checkType. Our environments is now a record

    data Env = Env { localVar :: M.Map Int Val
                   , constant :: M.Map String Val }

The inferring stage is mostly the same

    inferType :: Env -> IExpr -> GenT Int Maybe Val
    inferType _ (Var _) = lift Nothing -- The term is open
    inferType (Env _ m) (Const s) = lift $ M.lookup s m
    inferType (Env m _) (Free i) = lift $ M.lookup i m
    inferType _ ETrue = return VBool
    inferType _ EFalse = return VBool
    inferType _ Bool = return VStar
    inferType _ Star = return VStar
    inferType env (Annot e ty) = do
      checkType env ty VStar
      let v = cnf [] ty
      checkType env e v >> return v
    inferType env (App f a) = do
      ty <- inferType env f
      case ty of
       VPi aTy body -> do
         checkType env a aTy
         return (body $ cnf [] a)
       _ -> lift Nothing
    inferType env (Pi ty body) = do
      checkType env ty VStar
      i <- gen
      let v = cnf [] ty
          env' = env{locals = M.insert i v (locals env)}
      checkType env' (cbind 0 (Free i) body) VStar
      return VStar

The biggest difference is that now we have to compute some types on the fly. For example in Annot we check that we are in fact annotating with a type, then we reduce it to a value. This order is critical! Remember that cnf requires well typed terms.

Beyond this there are two interesting cases, there’s App which nicely illustrates what a pi type means and Pi which demonstrates how to deal with a binder.

For App we start in the same way, we grab the (function) type of the function. We can then check that the argument has the right type. To produce the output type however, we have to normalize the argument as far as we can and then feed it to body which computes the return type. Remember that if there’s some free variable in a then it’ll just be represented as VConst (CFree ...).

Pi checks that we’re quantifying over a type first off. From there it generates a fresh free variable and updates the environment before recursing. We use cbind to replace all occurrences of the now unbound variable for an explicit Free.

checkType is pretty trivial after this. Lam is almost identical to Pi and CI is just eqTerm.

    checkType :: Env -> CExpr -> Val -> GenT Int Maybe ()
    checkType env (CI e) v = inferType env e >>= guard . eqTerm v
    checkType env (Lam ce) (VPi argTy body) = do
      i <- gen
      let ce' = cbind 0 (Free i) ce
          env' = env{locals = M.insert i argTy (locals env)}
      checkType env' ce' (body $ VConst (CFree i))
    checkType _ _ _ = lift Nothing

And that’s it!

Wrap Up

So let’s circle back to where we started: bidirectional type checking! Hopefully we’ve seen how structuring a type checker around these two core functions yields something quite pleasant.

What makes this really interesting though is how well it scales. You can use this style type checker to handle subtyping, [dependent] pattern matching, heaps and tons of interesting features.

At 400 lines though, I think I’ll stop here :)

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Greater Fool - Authored by Garth Turner - The Troubled Future of Real Estate: Trust

SONY DSC

Kelly says she’d like to talk with her friends about this stuff, “but they’ve all been suckered into Vancouver area condos and ‘high interest savings accounts’, so that’s obviously no help.”

It’s a common complaint. Where do you go to get some indie thought about investing? After all, the bank’s in the business of selling you stuff. So are the mutual fund sharks. And the credit union. Don’t even think about an insurance or real estate guy. And your parents just want you to be little copies of them, with a mortgage. No wonder so many young people end up being schizophrenics, bouncing between dead-end savings accounts and high-risk, leveraged condo units. Both are really bad choices.

“I kind of feel like an idiot wasting all these years, but I’m an 80’s kid that has actually squirreled away money by renting and not trying to live like a rock star,” says Kelly. “I have a decent job (~60k/yr), no debt and 50k in the bank excluding RRSPs, but I’ve been completely ignorant to investments. I’ve read your posts a few times but I can’t shake this lost in the woods feeling of ETF’s, and I’d rather do it right than get in over my head. What would you suggest for someone like me, that isn’t comfortable going full speed ahead with ETF?”

Kelly says she’s mostly worried about doing this herself. “I know that in starting out I’ll need help, and it will cost a percentage for managing a portfolio, but how do you go about finding someone that is competent in this?”

Well, first let’s discuss timing. Not a day goes by without newbies asking me if this is a good time to invest. Because we all now live on Internet time, when a full day is considered long-term and your Twitter feed never stops, people bounce around from headline to headline. This blog is a perfect example. It’s full of weirdos who ardently believe what just happened (Obama’s speech, ISIS, Ebola, bank layoffs, MH-17, mid-term elections, Fukushima) will alter the entire future. They’re wrong. They bury money, fear risk, buy gold, market-time – and lose.

Kelly’s young. The time horizon is long. And the world will continue to grow while she moves through her life. The doomers almost always end up being incorrect, as the last six years have so richly proven. It happened again this past week.

When growth slows more than people like, they kick it. Since 2008 the large central banks have been quietly coordinating monetary policy, to stave off deflation, support expansion and jobs. On Friday China chewed up interest rates, for example, chopping deposit and lending rates. In Europe the central bank boss, Mario Draghi, was crystal about what he’s got in mind: “We will do what we must to raise inflation and inflation expectations as fast as possible, as our price-stability mandate requires.”

And what does that mean? Cheap money, yes. Plus, central banks buying up assets to create demand and, ultimately, inflation. It’s what the US Fed did for the past four years, before ending its stimulus program in October. The results in America: unemployment went from 10.2% to 5.8%, corporate profits flowered, real estate prices recovered by half and the stock market increased 160%. I have no doubt Europe will be another Cinderella and China will plump, while the US advances its recovery. In other words, all the people waiting on the sidelines since 2008 – waiting for another 2008 – are fools. It ain’t coming.

But there are always risks. Monetary engineering brings volatility, as does the growing mountain of global debt. People overreact. They buy stuff that goes up and run screaming when it falls. This is why you need balance and diversity in any portfolio. The balance is between growth assets (based on stock markets) and safe stuff (called ‘fixed income’). The diversification comes from various assets (like real estate investment trusts, preferred shares, bonds and equity ETFs) and also geography (Canada, the US, international, emerging markets).

Normally, for example, stocks and bonds move in the opposite direction. When the Dow swoons, money flows into the safety of bonds, pushing their prices up while stock values decline. If you own both, you have a built-in hedge, and need not sweat over timing. Finally, all portfolios should be liquid, giving you the flexibility to avoid serious risk if necessary, or jump on a serious opportunity. Five-year GICs are not liquid. Soon neither will be condos.

With fifty grand, Kelly should not be paying an advisor, not giving the bank fat mutual fund fees. She should not be trying to time investments that will stay in place for years, if not decades. And the first place she should invest is inside her TFSA, where all gains will remain free of tax.

The process is simple. Open an online brokerage account. Establish a TFSA and a non-registered (or ‘cash’) account. Transfer your funds. Do what I recommended in a post several weeks ago:

“So divide the TFSA money into five piles, putting equal amounts into ETFs (exchange-traded funds) that mirror (a) the S&P 500, (b) the TSX 60, (c) a basket of preferred shares, (d) real estate investment trusts and (e) a Canadian bond index. You can use iShares products, or Vanguard, BMO exchange-traded funds or others. But these five will give you safe (preferreds and bonds) as well as growth (equities and commercial real estate).”

For example, using iShares, you’d buy XIU (Canadian stocks), XSP (US stocks), XPF (preferreds), XRE (real estate trusts) and XSB (short bonds). As your funds grow, you can add lesser weightings in XEM (emerging markets) or XCS (small-cap Canadian companies). When you get to $150,000 or so, it makes sense to pay someone 1% to manage this growing nestegg, rebalancing it, giving you tax avoidance advice and gaining further diversification.

Of course, this is but an example. There are lots of other exchange-traded funds around, and they’re getting cheaper (even though costs are already a small fraction of what a mutual fund charges). There are also advisors who’ll take on a smaller portfolio, but the fees can be brutal. Besides, you don’t need one.

If you get the right asset allocation and – above all – stop reading damn financial blogs, you’ll soar.

Open Culture: The Unexpected Math Behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMerSm2ToFY

If you’ve taken a good art history course on the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, you’ve inevitably encountered Vincent van Gogh’s 1889 masterpiece “Starry Night,” which now hangs in the MoMA in New York City. The painting, the museum writes on its web site, “is a symbolic landscape full of movement, energy, and light. The quietness of the village contrasts with the swirling energy of the sky…. Van Gogh’s impasto technique, or thickly applied colors, creates a rhythmic effect—the picture seems to constantly move in its frame.” Artistically, van Gogh managed to capture movement in a way that no artist had ever quite done it before. Scientifically, it turns out, he was on to something too. Just watch the new TED-ED lesson above, The Unexpected Math Behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”

Created by math artist/teacher Natalya St. Clair and animator Avi Ofer, the video explores how “Van Gogh captured [the] deep mystery of movement, fluid and light in his work,” and particularly managed to depict the elusive phenomenon known as turbulence. In Starry Night, the video observes, van Gogh depicted turbulence with a degree of sophistication and accuracy that rivals the way physicists and mathematicians have best explained turbulence in their own scientific papers. And, it all happened, perhaps by coincidence (?), during the turbulent last years of van Gogh’s life.

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The Unexpected Math Behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post The Unexpected Math Behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” appeared first on Open Culture.

Jesse Moynihan: Is That You?

image

From my Instagram: “4 new eps of Adventure Time next week. Tues is an ep I boarded solo. I remember this was the episode that started to break down my mental defenses, which resulted in possibly some of my best writing in the latter half of Season 6. “Best” meaning weirdest.”

Comments on my own comments: “Weird” is a reductive word. When I use the word “weird” I’m trying to put myself in the shoes of general audiences. The thing that’s invested me in working for the show is that season by season, my bosses allow me to experiment with narrative form, and thematic aggressiveness. It’s like a rubber band that keeps stretching. So when I’m on the verge of emotional/spiritual collapse, my writing for the show actually benefits in a way that makes me nervous about audience reactions. I don’t see any way around that kind of relationship between author and general audiences. There’s always going to be some kind of tension there – especially if you are trying out new shit with each go. I read the Bhagavad Gita recently, and it helped me navagate the idea of expectations. So I think I figured out a way to keep pushing without feeling too overwhelmed by the response to my work.

Right now I’m in a pretty steady zone – concentrating on characters and humor, less so about concepts – and it’s feeling good – especially since Ako is temporarily working with me again.

explodingdog-pictures: "Let's always remember to have fun" new at Explodingdog

11.20.14

I didn't expect the sun to be so bright or the night to be so dark.


Let's always remember to have fun

New Prints and stuff at Building a World.


explodingdog: I didn’t expect the sun to be so bright or the night to be so...



I didn’t expect the sun to be so bright or the night to be so dark.

new drawings at Explodingdog.com

All Content: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1

Thumb_thehungergamesmockingjay-2014-1

Jennifer Lawrence's charisma and the the sly excellence of her supporting cast keep "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1" aloft. This third installment in the "Hunger Games" saga (technically chapter three, part one) is a bleak, sometimes dire experience, and not only because it's the darkest installment yet in an already dark saga, catching dystopian rebels in a beaten-down and demoralized state. As written by regular series scribes Peter Craig and Danny Strong, and as directed by Frances Lawrence (who helmed the second film in the series, "Hunger Games: Catching Fire"), it also feels a bit stretched out, not to give the actors room to breathe and widen the film's narrative margins to better pack them with detail, but because that's how Hollywood increasingly does big budget "event" franchises these days: chopping one volume into two or three, a la "Harry Potter" or "The Hobbit," to satisfy the most literal-minded readers by dramatizing as many scenes as possible, and to sell more tickets.

When the story begins, our heroes have literally been driven underground. Hunger Games champion Katniss Everdeen (Lawrence) survived multiple iterations of the books' nationally televised, gladiator-styled, bread-and-circuses reality show, then was cynically positioned by the evil President Snow (Donald Sutherland) as a false figure of inspiration. She became the real thing thanks to her indomitable spirit, plus clever plotting by rebel fighters and image manipulators, including Katniss's once-drunk and now sober mentor, Haymitch (Woody Harrelson); the propagandist and image consultant Plutarch (the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, to whom the film is dedicated); the tech genius Betee (Jeffrey Wright), and the image wizard (and ace comic relief) Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks).

"Mockingjay, Part 1" picks up where "Catching Fire" left off, with Katniss, rescued from Quarter Quell, living in a compound under the rubble of District 13 with her fellow insurrectionists. Led by their intrepid district president Coin (Julianne Moore, sporting a frosted 'do and a severe demeanor), our heroes endure attacks by Snow's planes and troops while plotting their next righteous move. Of course, Katniss is also supported and pined-after by her loyal right-hand, Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth), even as she frets over the fate of her great love, the still-milquetoast Peeta (Josh Hutcherson), who's being held hostage by Snow's forces and turned into an anti-Katniss propaganda tool, denouncing our heroine on national TV in order to legitimize his puppet masters.

If "The Hunger Games" films were to be compared structurally to "Star Wars"—still the commercial Holy Grail of film franchises—you might say that this one is the first half of "The Empire Strikes Back," with emphasis on the visually and drastically oppressive Hoth sequences. The plot takes us from from setback to setback to setback until we feel suffocated (on purpose). Snow has the overwhelming military advantage, and in a couple of effective action scenes, we get the sense of just how long the rebels' odds of victory are. The best of these depicts an aerial assault that's filmed mostly from ground level, envisioning Snow's warplanes as chunky blurs that can corner in midair, like gulls. 

There's also a mild strain of media criticism and satire, though this time out it's less focused on the puerile distractions of televised mayhem and more interested in the construction of political images. Like the other films in the series, this "Hunger Games" sequel is good at evoking present-day, real-world phenomena while coyly refusing to commit to any specific allegory. A full-on, deliberately suicidal assault on a heavily armed government target faintly echoes images of nonviolent resistance from the Indian uprising against the British and the American Civil Rights movement, up to the point when the advancing rebels quit absorbing punishment and start dishing it out. Katniss is sold to the like-minded as a Che Guevara or young Fidel Castro (or perhaps a video-taunting Al Qaeda or ISIS-type, though of course Western audiences would rather not consider things from that angle). A good portion of the film's first half is about Katniss being shaped and sold and even packaged by Coin and her allies as a sort of pre-fabricated deliverer, the Mickey Mouse or Mr. Clean of the revolution, then rebelling against this tendency and figuring out (with help from Plutarch) that in revolution, as in advertising, authenticity sells better than slickness.

The problem is, for all its surface intelligence, "Mockingjay, Part 1" has little depth, and that sometimes makes it much more frustrating than a more knowingly shallow and silly movie might have been. One sometimes gets the sense that the moviemakers want credit for more political daring (in a mainstream blockbuster) than they're actually willing to earn. There are many tantalizing and even powerful allusions, such as Katniss addressing her public while standing in a cityscape bombarded by Snow's forces, a scene that evokes pro-Palestinian camera crews showcasing collateral damage from Israeli airstrikes; but these are never developed beyond the barest wisp of a notion, and they sit quite awkwardly next to all the film's narrative cliches and emotional shortcuts: the scene where the excessively "packaged" icon throws away the script and speaks from the heart; the scene where the powerful old bad guy is being shaved with a straight razor and gets nicked and treats the wound as a metaphor; etc. 

Katniss's participation in a chaste and (seemingly deliberately) dull love triangle with two young men of negligible charisma seems intended to build her up and ensure that no one can steal the main character's spotlight; there's a "turnabout is fair play" aspect to this, and at times it plays like the long delayed answer to those '70s films driven by super-capable male characters, often played by Paul Newman or Robert Redford or Al Pacino, whose love interests were simpering bores. Katniss is such a powerful character, so strong and simple, that she wouldn't be diminished by playing opposite more interesting romantic leads. As is, she's like Scarlett O'Hara opposite two Ashley Wilkeses. The blandness of the film's romantic energy might not seem so glaring if this particular installment didn't find Katniss in a state of vulnerability, recuperating from physical and emotional damage; she's much more passive here than in previous installments (which is true to the novel, I'm told), but it's still frustrating to see her reduced to a bystander during the film's action climax, watching heroic guys doing heroic things on TV monitors.

Despite all this, "Mockingjay, Part 1" is still an engrossing movie, with a wrenching ending. It's good enough to move the story along, but no more than that. It has a good heart, exemplified by its inspiring heroine. If only it had poetry, or some sort of edge.

Potz!Blitz!Szpilman!: Haseeb Ahmed & Jasper Coppes

Haseeb Ahmed & Jasper Coppes, 2012

Open Culture: David Lynch Takes Aspiring Filmmakers Inside the Art & Craft of Making Indie Films

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FG0OzpEjUPU

As a couple of generations of film students have shown us, you shouldn’t try to imitate David Lynch. You should, however, learn from David Lynch. At his best, the director of EraserheadBlue Velvet, and Mulholland Drive has managed, in the words of David Foster Wallace, to “single-handedly broker a new marriage between art and commerce in U.S. movies, opening formula-frozen Hollywood to some of the eccentricity and vigor of art film.” How has Lynch brought his enduringly strange and richly evocative visions to the screen, and to a surprising extent into the mainstream, without much apparent compromise?

You can get an idea of his method in Room to Dream: David Lynch and the Independent Filmmaker, the twenty-minute documentary above. Since Lynch hasn’t released a feature film since 2006’s Inland Empire — an especially uncompromising work, admittedly — some fans have wondered whether he’s put the movies, per se, behind him. But Room to Dream shows the director in recent years, very much engaged in both the theory and process of filmmaking — or rather, his distinctive interpretations of the theory and process of filmmaking.

This touches on his childhood obsession with drawing weapons, his discovery of “moving paintings,” his endorsement of learning by doing, how he uses digital video, his enjoyment of 40-minute takes, why people fear the “very dark,” conveying meaning without explaining meaning (especially to actors), the process of “rehearsing-and-talking, rehearsing-and-talking,” how Avid (the short’s sponsor, as it would happen) facilitates the  “heavy lifting” of editing his footage, how he finesses “happy accidents,” how he composes differently for different screens, and the way that “sometimes things take strange routes that end up being correct.” Take Lynch’s words to heart, and you, too, can enjoy his experience of crafting what he calls “sound and picture moving along in time” — with or without an Avid of your own.

Room to Dream will be added to our collection, 200 Free Documentaries Online.

via NoFilmSchool

Related Content:

Akira Kurosawa’s 80-Minute Master Class on Making “Beautiful Movies” (2000)

David Lynch Presents the History of Surrealist Film (1987)

10 Tips From Billy Wilder on How to Write a Good Screenplay

Tarkovsky’s Advice to Young Filmmakers: Sacrifice Yourself for Cinema

Filmmaking Advice from Quentin Tarantino and Sam Raimi (NSFW)

Colin Marshall hosts and produces Notebook on Cities and Culture and writes essays on cities, language, Asia, and men’s style. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

David Lynch Takes Aspiring Filmmakers Inside the Art & Craft of Making Indie Films is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post David Lynch Takes Aspiring Filmmakers Inside the Art & Craft of Making Indie Films appeared first on Open Culture.

the waxing machine: shoesandsocks: cardboardamerica: Burger Chef Hamburgers -...





shoesandsocks:

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Burger Chef Hamburgers - Tampa/Clearwater, Florida

Let us prove the big difference in juicy taste and tenderness when your burger is OPEN-FLAME BROILED! To enjoy your FREE Burger Chef Hamburger, just present this card at any of these addresses.

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OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS: While discussing video games...


Penny Arcade: News Post: Small Packages

Tycho: There is a very fixed menu of ingredients at Taco Bell; it can be conceived of as an alternative to the standard Periodic Table, whose quasi-edible permutations constitute a distinct flavorverse.  Far Cry 4 has a similar catalog of “elements,” like Honey Badger, Falcon, Tuk-Tuk, Assault Rifle, Boar, and so on.  (I would consider AK-47 an isotope of Assault Rifle).  After the latest of Gabriel’s misadventures, it became clear that he was basically dipping a ladle in that soup of possible events and coming up with treachery every time.  He was, in effect,…

Colossal: Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Twisted and Curled Forms Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell wood sculpture

Brussels-based sculptor Xavier Puente Vilardell turns blocks of wood into twisting, curled objects that look more like scrolls of paper or pieces of fabric than lumber. You can see a bit more of his pine wood sculptures over on Behance and on his website.

explodingdog: Fish and Star



Fish and Star

new shelton wet/dry: Every day, the same, again

Woman opens professional cuddling shop – gets 10,000 customers in first week Men are more likely to help a woman if she’s wearing heels. And the higher the heels, the more willing the men were to assist her. [via gettingsome] Business culture in banking industry favors dishonest behavior, study shows CEO Facial Width Predicts Firm Financial Policies Facial [...]

TheSirensSound: Lawrence English

Lawrence English

Lawrence English is media artist, composer and curator based in Australia. Working across an eclectic array of aesthetic investigations, English’s work prompts questions of field, perception and memory. He utilises a variety of media including live performance, audio / visual environments, found sound / vision to create his work that typifies his interests in creating experiences that create subtle transformation of space and ask audiences to become aware of that which exists at the edge of perception.

English’s work over the past decade, both in performative and gallery settings, has earned him a strong reputation as one of the unique voices producing sound artworks from within Australia. He has presented concerts and installed pieces for numerous festivals including Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival (UK), Observatori (Spain), Outro_Rio (Brazil), Unsound (Poland) and AltMusic (New Zealand) amongst others. He also curates the burgeoning ROOM40 imprint, the Someone Good label and organises numerous events and festival throughout Oceania.

[ Songs of the Living ] & [ And The Lived In ]

[ ROOM40 ] is pleased to announce the release of a free double digital edition, Songs of the Living, and And the Lived In, from artist and composer, Lawrence English. The editions comprise recordings of fauna, and spaces respectively, collected over more than ten years from across the globe—Antarctica, Amazon, Japan, North America, and the UK. In the course of making the recordings, English was hit by lightening, swam in Antarctic waters to rescue gear, was assaulted by seals, swam with Bota Rosa (Amazonian Dolphins), and travelled deep under the earth in search of quiet space. Songs of the Living, And the Lived In are live for free download as of 12:12pm, Wednesday December 12, 2012 (AEST), including a photo set documenting recording sites.

From the artist:

This pair of editions is the end result of a lingering thought that, until recently, had remained unresolved. The primary reason for this project’s laboured birth lies in a question surrounding the meaning and role of field recordings. A question that occupies a good deal of my time when working with these materials. In recent years, we’ve seen a blooming of field recording practices. This has been due to a greater understanding and renewed interest in this area, as well as a growth in cheaper, accessible technologies and the opportunity for people to travel widely and record with relative ease. These factors have ensured no shortage of wonderful and insightful recordings – but at the same time there’s also what can only be described as a glut of material available, making navigation for even the most experienced ears complicated and at times frustratingly exhausting.

Field recordings over the past decade have found themselves everywhere and in every variation you can imagine – from highly focused near scientific documentations through to installation works and even as backing ambiences in pop music. The outside world has found its way into the studio like never before. So with so much already out there, I have found myself asking what value do these recording hold and why are they worthy of our most precious asset – time.

That presents a challenge though for all of the individual ‘sound polaroids’ that are captured over the years. Momentary sounds and situations that each contain a characteristic or sensation that’s unique and provocative. With this challenge in mind I have collected together, a series of recordings that for me speak to the richness and power of the sound world that surrounds us.

Field recording holds a special place in my heart – part active listening, part hunting, part happy accident, part polaroid, part archive – though wholly personal. No two recordings made in the same place at the same time will be identical and there in lies the beauty of the work. Similar to photography or portraiture, the artist selects the frame and what to prioritise within that frame (either in pre or post production). These choices ultimately shape the ways in which the listener can come to and understand the sounds. I’ve divided these recordings into two categories; Songs Of The Living, concerned primarily with non-human living creatures and And The Lived In, focused on environmental spaces and ‘social’ field recordings.

BOOBANA ECHOES

I couldn’t be more pleased to have these recordings published by the fine Winds Measure imprint. I had the pleasure to meet and record with Akio Suzuki late in 2005. Having discovered his work a good few years before that, I had always been impressed with his clear passion for the expressive nature of sound – not merely as a vibrational art form, but also for its mystic, perhaps even spiritual qualities. His many experiments with sound, space and environment were a great inspiration for me and still to this day fill me with a great sense of wonder ( no doubt a result of Suzuki’s magician like quality, after all he is a shaman ).

These recordings are edits from a series of both site specific and situation specific encounters we developed together during a short performance based residency in Brisbane. The first recordings we made together were site specific, and the title of this edition reflects the location in which we began working on the project together. Boombana is an area of forest that shifts from open eucalypt woodland to sub-tropic rainforest within a matter of 500 metres. It’s located on route to Mt Nebo and not far from there, the view stretches all the way to Moreton Bay. I recorded Suzuki-san during high summer, the forest sizzling with an eerie electronic fizz of cicadas and leaf hoppers, occasionally interrupted by screeching Sulphur Crested Cockatoos. It was these recordings that form the inspiration for the duet published here.

Returning to Brisbane, Suzuki and I recorded a series of pieces late one evening. Suzuki played his remarkable Analapos and I used a some hand percussion and a range of small electronic devices that in many ways reflected on the initial sessions we recorded in Boombana – the cicadas replaced by tone generators and filters. The titles of each work also directly link back to Boombana, its distinctive flora and fauna. Coming back to these recordings more than half a decade after they were created, I’m still captivated by Suzuki’s remarkable use of his unique instrument the Analapos and I’m inspired to this day by his mastery of sound as an art form. I dearly hope you enjoy these pieces.

WILDERNESS OF MIRRORS

Wilderness of Mirrors is the new album from Lawrence English. It is two years in the making and the first album created since the release of his 2011 ode to J.A Baker’s novel, The Peregrine. It is English’s most tectonic auditory offering to date, an unrelenting passage of colliding waves of harmony and dynamic live instrumentation. The phrase, wilderness of mirrors, draws its root from T.S Eliot’s elegant poem Gerontion. During the cold war, the phrase became associated with campaigns of miscommunication carried out by opposing state intelligence agencies. Within the context of the record, the phrase acted as a metaphor for a process of iteration that sat at the compositional core of the LP. Buried in each final piece, like an unheard whisper, is a singularity that was slowly reflected back upon itself in a flood of compositional feedback. Erasure through auditory burial.

Wilderness Of Mirrors also reflects English’s interests in extreme dynamics and densities, something evidenced in his live performances of the past half decade. The album’s overriding aesthetic of harmonic distortion reveals his ongoing explorations into the potentials of dense sonics. “During the course of this record,” English explains, “I was fortunate enough to experience live performances by artists I deeply respect for their use of volume as an affecting quality, specifically Earth, Swans and My Bloody Valentine. I had the chance to experience each of these groups at various stages in the making this record and each of them reinforced my interest in emulating that inner ear and bodily sensation that extreme densities of vibration in air brings about.”

The album is moreover a reflection on the current exploitation of the ideals of the wilderness of mirrors, retuned and refocused from the politics of the state, to the politics of the modern multiplex. The amorphous and entangled nature of the modern world is one where thoughtless information prevails in an environment starved of applied wisdom. Wilderness Of Mirrors is a stab at those living spectres (human and otherwise) that haunt our seemingly frail commitments to being humane.

“We face constant and unsettled change,” English notes, “It’s not merely an issue of the changes taking place around us, but the speed at which these changes are occurring. We bare witness to the retraction of a great many social conditions and contracts that have previously assisted us in being more humane than the generations that precede us. We are seeing this ideal of betterment eroded here in Australia and abroad too. This record is me yelling into what seems to be an ever-growing black abyss. I wonder if my voice will reflect off something?”

credits
released 21 July 2014
Wilderness Of Mirrors
is reflection upon reflection,
a pure white out of absolute aurality.

< < < < < [ [ BANDCAMP ] | [ ROOM40 ] ]. > > > > >
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Lawrence English - Wilderness Of Mirrors

Artist – Lawrence English
Album – Wilderness Of Mirrors [ * * * * * * * * * * ]
Release Date – 2014
Genre – Experimental, Ambient, Field Recordings, Dark-ambient, Minimal, Obscure-ambient

Tracklist

1. The Liquid Casket 06:20
2. Wilderness Of Mirrors 02:37
3. Guillotines And Kingmakers 02:02
4. Another Body 06:26
5. Wrapped In Skin 03:18
6. Forgiving Noir 08:25
7. Graceless Hunter 05:10
8. Hapless Gatherer 04:47
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ABSOLUTE MUST Lawrence English – Wilderness Of Mirrors
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Akio Suzuki & Lawrence English – Boombana Echoes

Artist – Akio Suzuki & Lawrence English
Album – Boombana Echoes
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Experimental, Ambient, Field Recordings, Dark-ambient, Minimal, Obscure-ambient

Tracklist

1. Ficus Watkinsiana (6:23)
2. Manorina Melanophrys (8:46)
3. Eucalyptus Signata (5:05)
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FREE Akio Suzuki & Lawrence English – Boombana Echoes
SHOP Akio Suzuki & Lawrence English – Boombana Echoes
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LAWRENCE ENGLISH - SONGS OF THE LIVING

Artist – Lawrence English
Album – Songs For The Living
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Experimental, Ambient, Field Recordings, Dark-ambient, Minimal

Tracklist

01 Unidentified Monkey Calling Amazon Brazil
02 Daintree Rainforest At Night Australia
03 Sub Antarctic Skua Eating Adele Penguin Esperanza Bay Antarctica
04 Trigona carbonaria Hive Invasion Brisbane Australia
05 Cormorants Flocking At Dusk Amazon Brazil
06 Semi Kyushu Japan
07 Water Boatman And Unidentified Water Insects Amazon Brazil
08 Howler Monkey Amazon Brazil
09 Unidentified Cicada outside Mt Isa Australia
10 African Penguin Simon s Town South Africa
11 Various Chiroptera Samford Australia
12 Rhinoceros Beetle Brisbane Australia
13 Antarctic Fur Seals Esperanza Bay Antarctica
14 Screaming Piha and Mealy Parrot Amazon Brazil
15 Adele Penguin Chicks Esperanza Bay Antarctica
16 River Dolphis Amazon Brazil
17 Tui And Silver Eyes Kaka Point New Zealand
18 Unidentifed Chiroptera Amazon Brazil
19 White Throated Toucan Dawn Display Amazon Brazil
20 Antarctic Fur Seal Sleeping Esperanza Bay Amazon
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FREE Lawrence English – Songs For The Living
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LAWRENCE ENGLISH - AND THE LIVED IN

Artist – Lawrence English
Album – And The Lived In
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Experimental, Ambient, Field Recordings, Dark-ambient, Minimal

Tracklist

01. Shore Bribie Island Australia 05:49
02. Cemetary Gate Hobart 01:55
03. Old Motor Shropshire UK 00:33
04. Ceramic Oven And Wind Storm Walchau Hutte Austria 02:28
05. Sand Bar Stradbroke Island Australia 00:36
06. Microphone Collapsing In Grass Sinclair Wetland New Zealand 02:29
07. Mamori Bird Caller Amazon Brazil 00:44
08. Toy Store Ueno Japan 02:01
09. Ape Caves Oregon USA 00:49
10. Suikinkutsu Taima Japan 03:08
11. Subway Intercom New York USA 01:56
12. First Storm Of The Season Kelvin Grove 00:18
13. VLF During Solar Storm Lake Pedder Australia 02:56
14. Blizzard Battering Walls Marambio Antarctica 05:49
15. Rice Field Drainage Fujian China 00:30
16. Wind Rio Gallegos Patagonia 02:25
17. Landing Brisbane Australia 01:24
18. Air Conditioning Vent Shibuya Japan 04:09
19. The Last Game Of The Night Brisbane Australia 05:10
20. Remarkable Cave Tasman National Park Tasmania 05:00
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FREE Lawrence English – And They Lived In
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Artist – Lawrence English
Album – Kiri No Oto
Release Date – 2008
Genre – Experimental, Ambient, Field Recordings, Dark-ambient, Minimal, Soundscape

Tracklist

01 Organs Lost At Sea 4:42
02 Soft Fuse 6:52
03 White Spray 5:08
04 Waves Sheer Light 5:23
05 Commentary 4:30
06 Allay 5:21
07 Figure’s Lone Static 7:26
08 Oamura 3:49
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BANDCAMP Lawrence English – Kiri No Oto
FILEFACTORY Lawrence English – Kiri No Oto
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Lawrence English
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new shelton wet/dry: ‘When I don’t have red, I use blue.’ –Picasso

Ivan Pavlov is best known as a founding figure of behaviorism who trained dogs to salivate at the sound of a bell. […] Pavlov didn’t use a bell, and for his real scientific purposes, couldn’t. English-speakers think he did because of a mistranslation of the Russian word for zvonok (buzzer). […] Although one would expect that [...]

All Content: Shirley Clarke: Made In America

Thumb_shirleyclarke

Over the fall, I had the honor of teaching a section of the “Language of Film” course at New York University, to a group of very bright freshman. The main lecturer was in charge of the syllabus, and the textbook was David Bordwell and Kristen Thomson’s excellent “Film Art: An Introduction.” One of the sessions was on “Experimental Film,” and for that class I showed a section of Shirley Clarke’s 1985 “Ornette: Made In America,” ostensibly a documentary about the incredible jazz innovator Ornette Coleman. In an unusual coincidence, at the lecture prior to my class, Clarke’s 1958 short “Bridges-Go-Round,” an abstract study of New York bridges. “Makes sense,” I said to my class at the time.

Because there’s a definite but perhaps overtly untraceable through line connecting the very early work of Clarke to “Ornette,” unfortunately her final film. (Clarke died in 1997.)  While “Ornette” depicts a very distinct story, that is, the homecoming of Coleman to Fort Worth, Texas, where he is to initiate a new arts center called Carnival of Dreams. There’s thrilling performance footage showing the great musician playing with an orchestra augmented by his electric group Prime Time. There’s ironic verite footage showing the reactionary and Wild West sides of the city to which he’s returning. And there’s…well, more, and a lot of the more is what you don’t expect in a conventional documentary. As in a fictional young Ornette wandering the downtown streets of the city, saxophone in hand Godard-like snatches of text displaying on an LED board spanning an overpass above one of the city streets. Lengthy shots of Fort Worth skyscrapers at dusk. The cumulative effect of the varying styles and idioms Clarke draws upon gives a larger sense of both Coleman the man and Coleman the artist than would a more linear or conventional or even longer (this movie comes in at a trim 77 minutes) work might have. My argument when showing sections of the movie to my class was that this was a direct result of her background in experimental film, and that “Ornette: Made In America” was in a sense an experimental film itself.

Andrei Tarkovsky, in his book “Sculpting In Time,” vents a very Tarkovskian disapprobation at the very term “experimental film:” “How can you experiment in art? Have a go and see how it turns out? But if it hasn’t worked, then there’s nothing to see except the private problem of the person who has failed.” Clarke does not fail, so what may we call her work? “Free” film, as in “Free Jazz,” a Coleman coinage and the title of his revolutionary early ‘60s recording? Or perhaps “Harmalodic film,” after Coleman’s stated method dating from the 1970s, summarized thusly: “the use of the physical and the mental of one's own logic made into an expression of sound to bring about the musical sensation of unison executed by a single person or with a group.” Well, that doesn’t quite fit, but what is indubitable is that Clarke’s sense of film form was always dictated by an unerring logic that always honored her theme and/or subject matter. This is certainly true of her unforgettable 1967 picture “Portrait of Jason,” a hilarious, heartbreaking and infuriating record of the evening of December 3, 1966, on which Clarke trained her camera on the voluble, proudly outrageous, sometimes outrageously drunk, and often destroyed (in several senses) Jason Holliday, anecdotalist, entertainer, and African-American gay man in an America where the existence of such a bring was technically outlawed. Clarke keeps her camera largely static, but never allows the illusion that this is anything besides a film—and at some times an odd filmed interrogation, as certain personal tensions between the people behind the camera and before it come to light—to insinuate itself to the viewer. I wrote this about the film and its subject back in 2010:

“Jason's voice is a buzzy lilt, not quite overtly effeminate but full of queenishly ironic inflections. He's a born storyteller and rather obviously a wreck, and it seems to be Clarke's plan to lay him bare as a tragic figure. With the help of pungent interpolations from Clarke's husband Carl Lee, an African-American actor that Jason had a substantial crush on […] and a bottle of vodka that Jason takes a large number of hearty swigs from, they eventually get their wish. ‘Oh the people they just don't know, child, they just don't know,’ he says of those who would tell him how to live. He describes himself as ‘nervous and guilty and simple.’ ‘I wish I was straight,’ he mutters at one point, and as wasted as he is, one doesn't know if he means not gay, or not a drunk. There's a sense, I suppose, in which this film could be misread—as a cautionary tale, a warning against the excesses of a homosexual ‘lifestyle.’ But before one even thinks of going there, one would do well to recall Rosa von Praunheim's maxim: ‘It's not the homosexual who is perverse but the situation in which [he or she] lives.’ The particulars of Jason's situation at that moment in time and space—black and gay in pre-Stonewall New York— had almost doomed him from the get-go. As Edmund White notes in his recent memoir City Boy, the very notion of  ‘gay culture’ in the pre-Stonewall days was inconceivable. Even gays of highly advanced intellectual attainment, such as it was, were largely of the opinion that their homosexuality meant that there was something wrong with them, something they had to be rid of. Stonewall was literally a consciousness-expanding moment for New York gays, and gays all over the world. That Jason had the courage to speak for who he was, and that Clarke had the vision to want to record that is...well, staggering, when you think about it.”

The version I wrote of was a then-exemplary European issue from Second Run DVD. Milestone Film and Video has given us Demanders something to rejoice in this season by putting out their restorations of both “Jason” and “Ornette” out on DVD and Blu-ray discs, as volumes 2 and 3 of their “Project Shirley” series (Volume 1, of Clarke’s magnificent “The Connection,” awaits a home video release date). Both discs feature the films themselves looking as good as they ever will (and both have very striking visual textures, from the rough-and-ready black-and-white grain of “Jason” to the innovative use of video-intercut-with-celluloid of “Ornette”) and are rich in extras that add both context and historical data. Whether you call these “experimental” films or not, they are completely essential pieces of cinema that are as all-American as Ornette, Jason, or the filmmaker herself.


Planet Haskell: Philip Wadler: Bright Club


Tuesday 25 November at The Stand Comedy Club, I will be part of the line up at Bright Club, speaking on the subject of 'Turingery'. Bright Club is stand-up by academics---we are trained professionals; don't try this at home! Doors open 7:30pm, show starts 8:30pm. The Stand is at 5 York Place, Edinburgh, EH1 3EB. Tickets £5 at the door or online.

new shelton wet/dry: ‘Ivan Ilych’s life had been most simple and most ordinary and therefore most terrible.’ —Tolstoy

When I started life Hegelianism was the basis of everything: it was in the air, found expression in magazine and newspaper articles, in novels and essays, in art, in histories, in sermons, and in conversation. A man unacquainted with Hegel had no right to speak: he who wished to know the truth studied Hegel. Everything [...]

Colossal: New 360° Laser-Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

Japanese graphic designer and architect Yusuke Oono (previously) released a trio of new laser-cut storybooks including depictions of ‘Jack in the Beanstalk’ and Mount Fuji. The books are comprised 40 images bound into a book that can be fanned out at 360° creating a narrative that can be explored from multiple angles. While these pieces seen here are one-off creations, Oono has several other folding books and lights available through Artechnica.

Open Culture: The Jimi Hendrix Experience Plays “Hey Joe” & “Wild Thing” on The Band’s Very First Tour: Paris, 1966

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypsa15a3mgM

Jimi Hendrix lived fast, and I don’t just mean to evoke a rock star cliché, but to get at the speed at which his career moved. He arrived in England near the end of September, 1966, at the tender age of 23. In less than a month, he and his manager Chas Chandler had recruited Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell into the Experience and booked the band’s first gig on October 13 across the channel in Évreux, France, one of four French bookings as a supporting act for The Blackbirds and Johnny Hallyday. They played mostly covers, including Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor,” Otis Redding’s “Respect,” Don Covay’s “Mercy, Mercy,” and Chris Kenner’s “Land of a Thousand Dances,” and traditional song “Hey Joe,” soon to become the band’s first single. It’s unclear whether anyone recorded that first gig, but we do have some audio of the fourth, on October 18 at the Olympia in Paris. Just above hear them play “Hey Joe” from that night, and below, they do The Troggs’ “Wild Thing.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPp6d5Dg2Io

Hendrix was already a highly seasoned performer by this time, having blown minds all over the South while touring with, among others, the Isley Brothers, Little Richard, and King Curtis in the early sixties. He had been highly in demand as a backing and session player, but he grew tired of standing in the back and wanted to go solo. He met manager Chandler, then bassist for the Animals, while fronting his own band in New York. Chandler, writes PRI, “knew just what to do with the young guitarist” upon their arrival in England.

Six days after the short tour through France, the band played its first official show in the UK, at the Scotch of St. James, where the Beatles had a private booth. Hendrix proceeded to blow minds all over England, including, of course, those of all the British guitar greats: “Everyone’s eyes were glued to him,” remembers then girlfriend Kathy Etchingham, “He looked different. His guitar playing was superb. People in England hadn’t seen anything like it before. It was quite… out of this world.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VChqDZ49k4

People in the U.S. hadn’t seen anything like it either. While Hendrix had honed many of his signature stage tricks on the soul circuit, by the time he appeared at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, he had fully come into his own as a charismatic singer as well as a “near miraculous” guitarist. But in his move from R&B to rock and roll, he never lost his blues roots. “Hendrix wasn’t a typical pop or rock musician,” says Hendrix scholar and English professor Joel Brattin. He “was an improviser. So, if there are 100 different recorded versions of Purple Haze, it’s really worth listening to all 100 because he does something different each time.” The same can be said of the songs he covered, and made his own. Just above, see them play “Hey Joe” at The Marquee for German TV show Beat Club just months before the release of their 1967 debut album. And below, Hendrix exhorts the crowd to sing along before launching into “Wild Thing,” in a Paris appearance one full year after the recording above at the Olympia. Compare, contrast, get your mind blown.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFlw-hojM6I

Related Content:

See Jimi Hendrix’s First TV Appearance, and His Last as a Backing Musician (1965)

Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock: The Complete Performance in Video & Audio (1969)

Jimi Hendrix’s Final Interview Animated (1970)

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

The Jimi Hendrix Experience Plays “Hey Joe” & “Wild Thing” on The Band’s Very First Tour: Paris, 1966 is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post The Jimi Hendrix Experience Plays “Hey Joe” & “Wild Thing” on The Band’s Very First Tour: Paris, 1966 appeared first on Open Culture.

Paper Bits: Researchers Announce Advance in Image-Recognition Software - NYTimes.com

Researchers Announce Advance in Image-Recognition Software - NYTimes.com:

"Until now, so-called computer vision has largely been limited to recognizing individual objects. The new software, described on Monday by researchers at Google and at Stanford University, teaches itself to identify entire scenes: a group of young men playing Frisbee, for example, or a herd of elephants marching on a grassy plain.

"The software then writes a caption in English describing the picture. Compared with human observations, the researchers found, the computer-written descriptions are surprisingly accurate."

CreativeApplications.Net: Timeframing: The Art of Comics on Screens

US-SS-6Erik Loyer is a seasoned media artist and creative director who has spent the last several years thinking about the implications of screens on comics. Since 2008 he has been releasing innovative iOS experiments under the Opertoon imprint including the interactive comics Upgrade Soul and Ruben & Lullaby. Erik just launched Timeframing: The Art of Comics on […]

Arduino Blog: Global emotional light with Arduino

luz

Based on open source technology and programming, LUZ is a lighting project that product designer Marina Mellado designed and targeted to those people who are physically and psychologically affected by the lack of sun or daylight.

Luz is a one meter diameter ring of light. It connects two LED stripes RGB SMD5050 to an Adafruit TCS34725 sensor ( which I use to get the temperature of colour (K) and the light intensity (Lux) Values ) and an Arduino Uno.

The electronic system is programmed to modify gradually the light-color sensibility of the lamp depending on the weather conditions when the sensor is positioned by the window.

Check the video below to see the lamp in action:

All Content: San Diego Asian Film Festival 2014

Thumb_director-miko-livelo-joem-bascon-and-jun-sabayton-on-the-set-of-blue-bustamante-photo-from-the-films-facebook-page

San Diego, my hometown, is not only the summer superhero party central with San Diego Comic-Con in July, it is also the host of the San Diego Film Festival from Nov. 6-15. That's actually longer than the American Film Institute's Film Festival (Nov. 6-13).

Because I was up in Hollywood at the AFI Fest, I have written reviews of some screeners kindly sent to me by the festival's very persuasive Brian Hu, Artistic Director of Pacific Arts Movement, presenters of the festival. He might not be Dr. Who, (Try the San Diego Gaslamp district in July for any one of those Whos), but if you're in San Diego next year or can borrow a TARDIS, he and his crew can surely steer you toward interesting times. Here's a sample of what they had screening this year.

"Blue Bustamante": George Bustamante (Joem Bascon) is feeling the immigrant worker blues. This isn't pre-world War II, but 1990. He’s left his pouty wife June (Dimples Romana) and his only child Kiko (Jhiz Deocareza) to work in Japan. Yet the engineering position doesn't pan out. Luckily, George ends up finding a job as a stunt man in a rip-off of the Power Rangers. This five-some is Force Five and George plays the blue one, but is too embarrassed to confess to his wife and son that he's fallen from a white collar job to a low skill worker on a very low budget TV series. Director Miko Livelo who co-wrote the script with John Elbert Ferrer embraces the confines of a low budget and then exploits it to poke fun at knock-off TV series and their flimsy sets and ersatz actors. The script doesn't quite get Japan right and there are some problems with logic (Would you hire someone illiterate and barely able to speak any of the local language as an engineer?) Yet there's an easy-going humor that may carry this for those who have fond memories of the Power Rangers or are still Power Ranger geeks. The movie Won four award at the Cinema One Originals Digital Film Festival, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor. In Tagalog and Japanese with English subtitles.

"Fuku-Chan of Fukufuku Flats”: Depending upon your pronunciation, you might think that this title is something you can't say in polite company. However, in Japanese the four-lettered word f**k, is actually pronounced differently. In this case, the fuku stands for 福 or “good fortune.” Yet fuku also means to mope. What we have here is three single men who live in Fukufuku (double happiness) Flats. The men are far from happy.  Fuku-chan is the 32-year-old Tatsuo Fukuda (Miyuki Oshima). The auspiciously named flats is really a run-down apartment building that he has been living in since he moved to Tokyo after his junior high school graduation. His work isn't especially inspiring, but he paints hand-made kites and flies them for fun and mediates between two other single men in the complex. In another part of Japan, a young woman's desire to become a photographer and be less ordinary results in a disaster when she finally meets the art photographer she admired. Told that she has bad karma, the woman, Chiho (Asami Mizukawa), remembers a mean prank she once played and sets out to find forgiveness from Fukuda and change her karma. For those of us who were targeted by the mean girls and boys in school, this is a thoughtful look at life's choices and consequences. In Japanese with English subtitles.

“A Hard Day”: The Korean name for this movie translates as “Take It to the End” and our protagonist Go Geon-soo (Lee Sun-kyun) isn’t sure where things will end up. We’ve all had bad days, but Go is a homicide detective who has just committed a homicide on the way to his mother’s funeral. Although he manages to hide the body, he also dishonors his mother’s memory. At work, he’s also under the gun because his squad is corrupt and has now come under investigation. As the squad members moan and whine and consider betraying each other, Go gets mysterious phone calls—someone saw the car accident and tries to blackmail him. Director Kim Seong-hun has created a tense and moody thriller where everything feels dark and gritty as if all the homicide detectives are creatures that have just crawled out from under a muddy rock and can’t wait to embrace the darkness of their souls again in those hidden places. The movie was show at Cannes under Director’s Fortnight. The movie has been nominated for seven Grand Bell Awards by the Motion Pictures Association of Korea, including Best Film, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, Best Screenplay and Best Cinematography. In Korean with subtitles. This movie also screened at the AFI Film Festival 2014.

“The Iron Ministry”: The actual translation of the title in Japanese and Chinese of the title is “Railroad” or literally “Iron Road.” This has nothing to do with a political organization type of ministry, but follows the rhythms of people traveling on the railroads in China. Having just come back from Japan where I used the bullet train, there is a world of difference between Japan and China. My rail journeys in the U.S. have been limited to short jaunts between Chicago and Urbana or Los Angeles and San Diego, so I’m sure that gives me an urban view of rail travel, but I somehow doubt that Americans bring great pots of recently butchered meat on to the train and then quietly trim layers of fat off in a long sheet. The sheet of fat is then neatly folded up, likely to be reserved for some use. Of course, not all of the travel is like that. Some people board the train carrying great baskets suspended on either end of a long thick pole. Most of the baskets are filled with vegetables. We also get to see people seated in first class or the crowded enough to have people sitting in the aisles economy class. There are short interviews in Chinese and we learn that some people are traveling to find better job opportunities or to visit a festival. At 82 minutes, the documentary still feels a little long. Some of the shots could have easily been cut out, but undoubtedly we are only seeing a small percentage of what was shot over a three-year period. The documentary received a Harrell Award at the Camden International Film Festival. The documentary was also shown at the AFI Film Festival 2014. In Chinese with English subtitles.

"The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness”: If you're a Japanese anime fan and especially if you love Hayao Miyazaki and the films from Studio Ghibli, this is a must-see. Director/writer Mami Sunada was allowed into the studio while Miyazaki was working on what would be his last animated feature, "The Wind Rises." At the same time, Studio Ghibli's co-founder, Isao Takahata, was working on "The Tale of Princess Kaguya." "Kaguya" was released on 23 November 2013 while "The Wind Rises" was released in July of the same year. The main character in "Wind" is actually voiced by a famous animator, Hideaki Anno ("Neon Genesis Evangelion") who previously worked for Miyazaki on “Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind." We get to see and hear about Anno’s casting as well as his break into animation under Miyazaki. Besides learning about the concerns and technical aspects of "Wind," we hear Miyazaki comments from time to time about the long period of time Takahata is taking with his project (which if you see it you won't be disappointed). Sunada also allows the camera to linger on the cats that share life with Miyazaki because after all, his inspiration for that catbus came from somewhere. In Japanese with English subtitles.

"Limited Partnership": In 1975, two men were married in Boulder, Colorado. It was an amazing act at the time and it was the beginning of of a long journey of love. The persistence of these two is heartbreaking. The two men were not both Americans and this made their union even more difficult. Filipino-American Richard Adams and Australian Tony Sullivan were one of the first same-sex couples to be legally married and because Sullivan was not an American citizen, their union also posed a problem for the American Immigration and Naturalization Service which denied Sullivan a green card as the spouse of an American because the couple was told via an official letter: "You have failed to establish that a bona fide marital relationship can exist between two faggots." The couple then sued the U.S. government and filed the first federal lawsuit for equal treatment for same-sex marriages. Only one of them lived to see where we are now, but the U.S. government never succeeded in separating them. Director Thomas G. Miller brings us their story through interviews and archival photos and movie clips because these two men were pioneers and not quiet about their concerns and were heroes in the gay and lesbian communities nationwide. This documentary is worth watching to see just how far we have come and how hard it was for these two and others. If you have any doubts that a same-sex union can be as real and as tender as a heterosexual marriage, this should be proof enough. Of course, we shouldn't need proof. What we need is more love and writers Kirk Marcolina with Miller fully recognize this. I didn't know that Asian Pacific Islanders Americans were very much a part of this story and helped set history, making this doc one that should be on everyone's list for Asian Pacific Islander Heritage month. The movie won the Audience Award at the Aspen Filmfest, the Audience Award at the Woodstock Film Festival and the HBO Films Best Producer Award at the Savannah Film and Video Festival.

"Man from Reno": When a guy slyly puts the moves on you and becomes too friendly too fast, red lights should be flashing in your head. Yet say you're lonely and in a foreign country, traveling by yourself for whatever reason. You haven't been able to speak your native language for days, maybe weeks. Wouldn't you greet a fellow country man or woman like an old friend? That's what happens when famous mystery writer Aki (Ayako Fujitani) suddenly disappears from a scheduled book tour. She meets the attractive Akira (Kazuki Kitamura) and they begin a fling, but when he disappears, she has a real mystery on her hands. Somehow, her Akira is tied up with another man who is connected to a small-town sheriff (Pepe Serna) and a car deserted in the fog. Director Dave Boyle ("White on Rice") sets a deliberate pace and doesn't up the spookiness level of this tale by taking turns into the supernatural. Instead, everything could exist in real life, the kind of real life we'd rather think is just the stuff of movies. Written by Boyle, Joel Clark and Michael Lerman, this is a story that looks into the gray areas of celebrity, friendship and life in a foreign country. This isn't Jessica Fletcher territory, but much murkier, taking place in the deep fog of loneliness and shifting populations. The movie won the Jury Award at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas and Best Dramatic Feature at the Los Angeles Film Festival.

"Meet the Patels" is an engaging documentary told with some shaky cam and microphones-displayed amateurish cinematography (by Geeta V. Patel). All that is fully embraced and excused by the cute intercut animated interviews with the focal point of the film--Ravi V. Patel. Geeta is Ravi's sister and this first-generation twosome are on a journey with their parents back to India, part of an annual pilgrimage that has taken a dire turn for two reasons: 1) Ravi has broken up with his long-time girlfriend and 2) thus he has no real defense against the marital aspirations of his parents and cousins. He has not, to be clear, ever told his parents about his very white girlfriend but that secret no longer exists as an invisible forcefield buffer. At 29, Ravi knows who he is but also recognizes that he is caught between his Indian world at home and in India and his American world and he can’t continue to keep them compartmentalized. He also looks at the arranged marriage between his parents and realizes that this long-held tradition can't be so easily dismissed. In Gujarati and English with English subtitles.

"The Songs of Rice": This is a documentary with very little explanation, but instead, director Uruphong Raksasad trusts the viewer to enjoy the scenery and the rhythms of life of planting, raising and harvesting rice in Thailand. Of course, rice is very different from wheat and requires wetlands that need to be plowed. Not all of what you'll see will qualify as either pastoral or exotic. You will see the beautiful landscape transformed by seasons of growth and there are wonderful scenes of dancing. Yet there are also scenes that might not be suitable for small children or those with queasy stomachs. Thailand is a poor country and sometimes you need to take protein where you can find it and that includes the rats found and killed in the fields of rice. However, it's likely that if you worked on a farm or were raised by someone who was, this won't phase you too much. It wasn't so long ago that San Diego was mostly farmland, covered with citrus orchards and tomato and cucumber fields. This documentary from the Netherlands but made in Thailand won an FIPRESCI Prize at the Rotterdam International Film Festival. In Thai with English subtitles.

"Telos: The Fantastic World of Eugene Tssui": Science fiction fans, this is an architect that you've seen in your dreams. He might have worked for a studio, but he really wants to work for real people and make permanent structures. Did America miss this generation's Antoni Gaudi? If you understand that reference and if Barcelona is on your bucket list for that reason, you should catch this documentary about the 59-year-old maverick architect. Tssui admits he is trying to change the world and bases his designs on nature and explains why he dislikes the concept of buildings as boxes. Although he was born in Cleveland, Ohio, he is currently based in Emeryville, Ca. He has been able to construct several residential homes, including that of his parents in Berkeley and he's also built the Watsu School at Harbin Hot Springs and, of course, his firm's headquarters.

"Uzumasa Limelight": Most Japanese men and women don't know how to wear kimonos and few men are comfortable enough in the traditional Edo period clothes to be able to walk in them, let alone fight with swords. Working in period dramas takes certain skills. According to the introductory sequence of this movie, there were men who specialized in dying in period pieces (kirare yaku) and lived in Uzumasa (Kyoto) which was considered the Hollywood of Japan. When the jidageki (period) movies and TV shows declined and the golden age of chanbara (sword-fighting dramas) was over, these workers are out of work. Yet who really goes into the movies hoping to be an extra? This movie deals with one particular kirare yaku, Kamiyama (Seizō Fukumoto), who has made a living by dying spectacularly, but now must find another job to support himself. A young girl, Satsuki (Chihiro Yamamoto), becomes his disciple and he trains her in this dying art of dying, bringing renewed attention to the chanbara genre. Crisply directed by Ken Ochiai, this nostalgic movie deals with traditions, economic survival and those damned kids at theme parks. The movie won a Best Feature Cheval Noir award for the director and a Jury Prize for Best Actor (Seizō Fukumoto) at the Fantasia Film Festival. In Japanese with English subtitles.

While AFI is walkable, the SDAFF is not, covering several venues throughout San Diego County including the Reading Cinemas in the Gaslamp District, the University of San Diego (Shily Theatre), the University of California San Diego (Calit2 Atkinson Hall Auditorium), San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts, Arclight Cinemas in La Jolla, the Museum of Contemporary Art Sherwood Auditorium in La Jolla and La Paloma Theatre in Encinitas.

Opening night featured "Revenge of the Green Dragons" which has already been reviewed on this website. If you can’t board a TARDIS, keep the festival in mind for next year. The festival has something for all budgets. This year, tickets for opening and closing nights were $12-$15. Other tickets ranged from $10-$15 and there were special deals like a festival 4-pack for $44 or an all festival pass for $250. There were plenty of free programs as well. For more information about next year’s programs, visit www.Pac-Arts.org and connect with the Pacific Arts Movement through social media or subscribe to their newsletter.

things magazine: Corridors of power, working in ruins

Things that have been lost or ignored: Forgetify. Work your way through the millions of unplayed Spotify tracks / Kickended. Bask in the schadenfreude of the Kickstarter projects that never got off the ground / Petit Tube, which purports to serve up YouTube videos with precisely zero views (thus removing them from the running) / in a similar Schrödinger-esque paradigm, some views on the role and status of ruin porn (at Atlas Obscura via MeFi): does the act of photographing, staging and rearranging a ruin stop it from being an authentically abandoned space and more of a stage set for our preconceptions of what a ruin should look like? / related: Deserted Space: Photos Document NASA’s Abandoned Launch Pads, photographs by Roland Miller / sort of related, the proposed refurbishment of the Palace of Westminster to cost in excess of £3 billion: ‘if nothing was done, politicians and staff would end up “working in a ruin” / in comparison, Will Self on why the Tate Modern extension symbolises the art world’s complicity in the widening gulf between rich and poor / and finally, the impossible office architecture of The Stanley Parable / the above image is a location shot from Richard III, mostly shot in and around a very different London.

explodingdog-pictures: "Sometimes I Wish for Things" Explodingdog drawings for November 19th 2014

11.19.14

Sometimes I Wish for Things


You don't do any of the things you used to do


Building A World new and updated. I have added many new standard prints at lower prices and am working on making it a "Best of" collection.
the email I sent out is here or check out the new store.


The Rhizome Frontpage RSS: Rhizome Today: Conversations at the Edge (of a Square)

A very odd promotional image for the FlexScan EV2730Q

This is Rhizome Today for Friday, November 21, 2014.

Rhizome Today is an experiment in ephemeral blogging: a series of posts that are written hastily in response to current events, and taken offline within a day or so. The latest post can always be found at http://www.rhizome.org/today.

[Editor's Note: We offer Rhizome Today contributors a variety of formats to use in writing their ephemeral post. An IM chat is one.]

Dragan Espenscheid: EIZO announces square monitor:  http://www.eizoglobal.com/press/releases/htmls/ev2730q.html

Zachary Kaplan: I don't get it.

DE: 1:1 ratio like a Blackberry screen

ZK: Ok, I get it, but, as we've been taught, the cinema screen is the screen above all.

ZK: 16:9

ZK: or whatever.

DE: Most users don't watch video all day though.

ZK: Ah, yes, as I see on the site:

ZK: "The extended vertical space is convenient for displaying large amounts of information in long windows, reducing the need for excess scrolling and providing a more efficient view of data."

ZK: IS THIS FOR HOME USE?

DE: I want one for sure.

ZK: But Dragan

ZK: You're an artist.

DE: The cinema format is so lame because it is optimized for not moving your eyes.

ZK: Can u expand?

DE: Cinema is supposed just to fill out your whole view and to take in the "complete picture."

ZK: Whereas a square, you're like, "why is this a square?", and then u pay attention?

DE: On the square, I can let my eyes wander.

ZK: ah. hrm.

ZK: Still think this sounds like an office piece....

ZK: Are there any artworks or other media things you think would look particularly good in this format?

DE: I believe it is more interactive, gives a viewer more power.

DE: VINE BIENNAL

ZK: Ha. Yes. Any mobile phone type thing, right? Which is based on the scroll paradigm?

DE: Casio WQV10 photo exhibition.
 
 
DE: No, vine and insta just chose square because it is the same no matter how you rotate the device

ZK: Well, I don't think either rotate, tbh.

ZK: Classic Blackberry owner comment.
 
ZK: Tho I'm starting to see the FEED use for this... but then I'm still like, "just scroll!" 
 
DE: Well, touch screens *and* device rotation weren't worth all the trouble.

ZK: (Btw, I like the kind of opiate of the masses take on cinema you're plying here. Very Kracauer.)

ZK: (Very anti-authoritarian.)
 
ZK: Is the square computer anarchist?

DE: It is not consumerist for a start. 

ZK: THAT IS FOR SURE
 
DE: The best exhibition for this format would be Olia's collection of transparent web pixels.
 

ZK: Nice.
 
ZK: Oh wait, one last q

ZK: is this happening only now?

ZK: Is it hard to make a square monitor?

ZK: Or is the market so fractured, individualized, it only made sense to make one now?
 
DE: If you read the comments on tech blogs announcing this monitor, lots of users speak up that they had enough of 16:9 or 21:9 because what they need to see expands below that format.

DE: The market for screens is actually shockingly homogeneous, with everything being 16:9 or wider.

DE: I don't think other formats are more difficult to make
 
ZK:
ZK: Well — I'm happy for people who need this. The market should meet every need! 

Editor's Note: During the editing process, this last minute comment was added:
 
Scott Meisburger: LCD panels are manufactured in giant sheets and then sliced up. I've read that the recent move to 16:9 everything (which is further from the golden ratio than the original Apple Cinema 16:10) has to do with normalizing the assembly. because all the panels are really made by 1 or 2 companies in Asia.

SM: ^^ pro tip

Michael Geist: The Spencer Effect: No More Warrantless Access to Subscriber Info With Five Minutes of Police Work

The Canadian Press reports that the RCMP has abandoned some Internet-related investigations because it is unable to obtain warrantless access to subscriber information. The article is based on an internal memo expressing concern with the additional work needed to apply for a warrant in order to obtain access to subscriber information. The changes have arisen due to the Supreme Court of Canada’s Spencer decision, which held that there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in subscriber information. As a result, it is believed that most telecom and Internet providers have rightly stopped voluntary disclosures without a warrant (some have still not publicly stated their disclosure practices).

The article notes how easily subscriber information was disclosed prior to Spencer:

Prior to the court decision, the RCMP and border agency estimate, it took about five minutes to complete the less than one page of documentation needed to ask for subscriber information, and the company usually turned it over immediately or within one day. The agencies say that following the Supreme Court ruling about 10 hours are needed to complete the 10-to-20 pages of documentation for a request, and an answer can take up to 30 days.

The troubling aspect of the story is not that some investigations are being curtailed because law enforcement is now following due process and that telecom providers are requiring a warrant before disclosing subscriber information. It is that for millions of requests prior to Spencer, it took nothing more than five minutes to fill out a form with the information voluntarily released without court oversight and without notifying the affected subscriber.

Moreover, the change in practice points to how the government’s claims that Spencer does not change anything with respect to Bills C-13 and S-4 is simply not credible. Those bills rely heavily on expanding voluntary disclosure at the very time that the approach has been discredited by the courts and abandoned by the telecom and Internet providers.

If the government were serious about providing law enforcement with effective investigative tools, it would drop the emphasis on warrantless voluntary disclosure and rethink its approach to new Internet warrants. As the Privacy Commissioner of Canada argued yesterday at a Senate committee, the threshold for a metadata warrant should be raised consistent with the privacy importance of the information. Meanwhile, the government could explore a new basic subscriber information warrant that would ensure court oversight but allow for access on an expedited basis. By maintaining that Spencer has no effect on its legislative proposals, it leaves everyone unhappy: police do not get the information they need (with appropriate oversight), the public is concerned with the privacy implications of lawful access, and the government’s hand-picked Privacy Commissioner criticizes it for failing to strike the right balance.

The post The Spencer Effect: No More Warrantless Access to Subscriber Info With Five Minutes of Police Work appeared first on Michael Geist.

All Content: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

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Vampires will always be with us, representative as they are of humanity's endless interest in blood-sucking creatures of the night who stand in the tense space where fear meets desire, and two of the dreamiest most romantic movies released this year have been vampire movies. Jim Jarmusch's "Only Lovers Left Alive" created a nocturnal dreamspace of love and old (really old) age, and music and survival, with two soul mates meeting up again and again throughout the endless abyss of time. Ana Lily Amirpour’s black-and-white debut feature "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night," with a vampire in a chador stalking the denizens of an Iranian town called "Bad City," owes a lot to Jarmusch, and in many ways the relationship seen between the two lead characters in Amirpour's film could be seen as the younger incarnations of Adam and Eve in "Only Lovers Left Alive." 

Along with Jarmusch, "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night" is steeped in other influences: Spaghetti Westerns, 1950s juvenile delinquent movies, gearhead movies, teenage rom-coms, the Iranian new wave. There's an early 1990s grunge-scene club kids feel to some of it, in stark contrast to the eerie isolation of the nighttime industrial wasteland in which the film takes place. The number of influences here could have made "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night" yet another movie-mad parody or an arch exercise in style; instead, the film launches itself into a dreamspace of its own that has a unique power and pull. The images are suggestive and symbolic, resonant with intersecting meanings and emotion, nothing too spelled out or underlined. Some of the images sit there unmoving for too long, but that very same stasis also helps create and enforce the underlying tension, the tormented space between people even when they are standing very close together. The film feels extremely personal. It is clear in every frame that Amirpour has put her own dream onscreen.

Filmed in the desert in California, with an excellent Iranian ex-pat cast, "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night" introduces us to a sprawling yet interconnected cast of characters. They all live in Bad City, an Iranian town filled with bad bad vibes, surrounded by pumping oil drills, seen like galumphing prehistoric beasts, going up and down, up and down. The opening sequence is classic Spaghetti Western (even down to the font of the title credits), mixed with a James Dean-era aesthetic, with a kid in a white T-shirt, blue jeans, and a 1950s pompadour walking around on the blasted-out outskirts of town. He drives a tail-finned Ford Thunderbird, its chrome gleaming in the bright sun, the car carrying so many powerful associations with it, of cool-ness, of Americana, of mobility, of status.

The characters we meet are archetypes, made strange when in service to Amirpour's unique vision. There is Arash (Arash Marandi), the kid with the vintage car who lives with his heroin-addicted father Hossein (Marshall Manesh). Arash deals drugs, too, as well as taking odd jobs as a gardener on the isolated rich side of town, having a tense flirtation with a rich girl who calls him into her bedroom. Dominic Rains plays the pimp Saeed, with the word "SEX" tattooed on the front of his throat, who supplies Hossein with drugs, steals Arash's precious car as payment, and harasses and abuses the prostitute (Mozahn Marnò) who works the dangerous streets for him. There is a little boy wearing a ragged coat (Milad Eghbali) who is a witness to everything, an innocent bystander to the corrupt and horrifying events of Bad City going on right before his eyes.

And then there is the vampire, known as Girl (Sheila Vand). The shadows are so pitch-black that she is able to stalk the streets in her full chador practically undetected. She hides almost completely in the liquidy black, revealing herself to her victims from across the wide expanse of vacant lots or abandoned parks. At one point, she skateboards down the middle of an empty dark street, her chador flowing behind her like gigantic black bat wings. The Pimp thinks she might be a prospective streetwalker and invites her back to his place, turning up the techno music, laying out lines of coke on the table. She stands motionless in the background, a shrouded, staring figure. People do not understand what she is or who she is, until it is too late.

Arash, let loose into the night, trying to get his car back from the pimp, trying to meet up with the rich girl at a nightclub, encounters the gliding ghostly figure in a chador a couple of times before they connect. At one point, returning from a costume party (where he went as Dracula), he runs into her on a lonely deserted street. When she sees the drunken Dracula staring up at a lamp-post, mesmerized by the light pouring out into the night, she stops. Does a double-take. Dracula? Is that you?

They have a couple of scenes together, two in particular, one in her basement dwelling place and one out by a power plant, that rank as two of my favorite sequences in any film this year. Both shiver and pulse with unspoken feeling, longing, and an acute and earnest romanticism. The walls of The Girl's dingy apartment are covered with posters from concerts she has clearly seen in the course of her eternal life: The Bee Gees, Madonna. She listens to records on a turntable. There is a whirling disco ball spinning above, throwing its lights across the grime. In a wordless moment he moves towards her as she stands at the record player, her back to him, the music creating a wall of sound, a wall of feeling. There is a rhapsodic catharsis in a moment like that, the stasis of all that came before suddenly releasing itself in a whoosh of emotion.

Conversely, that same static feeling can sometimes just sit on the screen, the tension within the frame dissipating, the image a beautiful picture but with no further revelations to be had within it. Stasis can make the film sag, on occasion, slacken and lose that taut weird otherworldliness. For the most part, though, Amirpour helms the ship confidently and with a lot of love and care.

Similar to Jarmusch, music is extremely important to Amirpour (who has also worked as a DJ), and the music choices in "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night" are intuitive and perfectly placed. There are a lot of catchy Iranian pop songs, and a couple of sequences are built explicitly around the song used as underscoring. Amirpour has a great feel for that, merging the events onscreen to the song choice in a way that feels inevitable, in a way that opens up the scene.

Much of the romanticism in "A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night" comes from the visuals (Lyle Vincent shot the film). The cinematography is glamorous black-and-white, crisp and specific, with light from the lamp-posts and car headlights refracting and fuzzing across the screen in a blurry line. The contrast between black and white is high, but there is much spill-over, light cutting through the blackness with difficulty, leaving fragments of itself in a trail behind. There are moments that stand alone, images both familiar (as though seen in a dream or a deja vu), and yet never presented before in just such a way: a black-veiled woman standing on the other side of an empty parking lot, barely perceptible through the gloom, surrounded by nothingness, a figure from a nightmare.

The Girl is a vampire who targets men, specifically men who are mean to women. Because she is in a chador, one can make all kinds of political and social connections with that storytelling device: she is an avenging angel of dominated and scorned womankind. Amirpour lets the images do all of the work for her, a huge strength of the film. The image of a female vampire skateboarding down a street, her voluminous veil flying out behind her, does the job with more poetic satisfaction and truth than any explicit monologue about the repression of women could ever do. At one point, she leans to whisper in the ear of the frightened urchin child, telling him to "be a good boy." It sounds like a threat. Be a good boy, or else … But these are undercurrents only, the subterranean basement of the film's psyche. Essentially, "A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night" is a film about film, a fresh and exciting re-imagining of a well-worn oft-told genre.

All Content: The King and the Mockingbird

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What a tortured path “The King and the Mockingbird” has taken to reach theaters in the United States, and what a treat it is for us to be able to experience it now.

The French animated gem—which massively influenced Hayao Miyazaki in the creation of his legendary Studio Ghibli—originally was conceived in the early 1950s, but became tangled in creative differences over which finished cut was the proper one. While it finally came out in France in 1980, it has been mired ever since in rights issues since, which have prevented its release in the U.S.

Now, a digitally restored version arrives in spectacular fashion with its mixture of bold imagery and biting wit.

Directed by the late, venerated animator Paul Grimault and written by poet and screenwriter Jacques Prevert, “The King and the Mockingbird” is based on a Hans Christian Andersen story, but its themes of repression and rebellion are timeless. The pompous King Charles (voiced by Pascal Mazzotti), who hates his subjects and is equally hated in return, rules over the amusingly named land of Takicardia. His underlings and hangers-on run around so frantically trying to fulfill his every wish, you can imagine that their hearts are pounding.

This king’s cold and imposing castle stretches 296 stories into the sky and houses everything from a royal pedicurist to a zoo to various types of prisons. The look of the place and the costumes the characters wear are deeply, richly colorful—reminiscent of princess-era Disney classics—but this is no cheeky, self-referential fairy tale turned on its head. “The King and the Mockingbird” may feature talking birds and dancing lions, but it’s a cutting, satirical statement about the perils of power run amok and the terror of totalitarianism.

At the top of the king’s palace lies his secret apartment, which is home to some of his most beloved artwork—chiefly, his portrait of a beautiful and innocent shepherdess (Agnes Viala) with whom he’s desperately in love. What he doesn’t know is that when he’s asleep, the shepherdess and the chimney sweep in the adjacent canvas (Renaud Marx) have been carrying on a sweet and tender affair.

In one of many examples of the film’s playful use of space, the two figures hold hands between their respective frames until the day they find the courage to leap out and explore the outside world together. Grimault depicts the castle as a place that’s dizzying in its boundlessness, from seemingly eternal staircases to secret passageways that magically appear out of nowhere.

Then an incarnation of the king in painting form sends out his loyal (but bumbling) police force to chase after the young lovers and stop them so that he can marry the shepherdess himself. But the couple gets help thwarting him at every turn from the one character in the kingdom who does not worship the monarchy: the brash and trash-talking Mr. Bird (Jean Martin), a brightly-feathered raconteur. Eventually, the bird needs some help of his own once he becomes the captive victim of the king’s tyranny.

“The King and the Mockingbird” accomplishes a great deal wordlessly, and this is especially true as the film’s tone turns bleaker and its look turns darker in oppressive, industrial ways in the third act. Surrealism remains the order of the day, but the mood of the film shifts seamlessly from impish, silly adventures to grotesque and nightmarish suffering.

And then the giant robot arrives.

Just when you think the film couldn’t possibly get any stranger, it does, in beautiful and imaginative ways. The young couple may be headed for their happily-ever-after, but you couldn’t possibly imagine how they’ll get there.

Paper Bits: "Our mistletoe drones are the perfect way to do this. Not only are they great fun for the entire..."

““Our mistletoe drones are the perfect way to do this. Not only are they great fun for the entire restaurant, but they help people get a little closer at this time of the year.”

-

Because nothing says “festive” like “greenery-bedecked flying deathbot”.

(via iamdanw)

TheSirensSound: To Destroy A City

To Destroy A City Profile

TO DESTROY A CITY

Chicago-based To Destroy A City was formed after Andrew Welch (drums/synths/programming), Jeff Anderson (guitar/keyboards), and Michael Marshall (guitar) met through various iterations of previous musical projects. When the three finally sat down together in the summer of 2010, they moved quickly, writing and recording their debut within a year’s time. The self-titled album was released by n5MD in September 2011. The remix companion album, Rebuild, was released in 2012 and featured reworked tracks by local scene-mates as well as other artists from the n5MD roster.

To Destroy A City’s sophomore full-length album entitled “SUNLESS” is due in the fall of 2014. On SUNLESS, TDAC expands on where they left off, drawing from cinematic, literary, and musical influences to craft a sprawling yet cohesive follow-up. Sonically, TDAC moves effortlessly between delicate ambient passages to beat-induced grooves to soaring melodic peaks. Electronic beat production is intertwined with live percussion, while layers of guitars, synths and pianos forge the melodic foundation of the tracks. The uninitiated may find To Destroy A City analogous to label mates Lights Out Asia and port-royal, and, due to some periodic drifting into similar spaces, the wide-screen ambient guitar duo Hammock.

DISCOGRAPHY

2014 – [ Sunless ]
2012 – [ Rebuild ]
2012 – [ Live at Lincoln Hall, Chicago IL ]
2011 – [ To Destroy A City “Self Title” Album ]

SUNLESS ( PR )

Sophomore albums can be a tough proposition, often created in a much shorter time span than the years of refinement most debut albums receive. Chicago based trio To Destroy A City dropped such a perfect debut in 2011 that fans have collectively held their breath for the follow-up. However, unlike some artists who rush into the studio to complete their sophomore release, TDAC has taken nearly three years to craft their follow-up: SUNLESS. The time and effort shows in the nine cinematically crafted tracks. At times SUNLESS is more electronic leaning than its predecessor, yet is still punctuated with sheets of glacially emotive guitar-work. Intricate electronic beats give way to propulsive live drumming. The synths, while more prominent this time out, fit effortlessly into the TDAC framework. SUNLESS is an album of contrasting moods, though the trio transitions between these moods more gently than their peers. Is SUNLESS ‘better’ than the trio’s debut? Both are equally strong, which is no small feat. But one thing is for sure: it is a move onward and upward into an expansiveness that they have only hinted at previously. A must-have for fans of God is an Astronaut, Hammock, and Lights Out Asia. SUNLESS will be available on CD/FLAC/MP3 as well as limited edition 2xLP with a limited amount in red/orange/black splatter.

SUNLESS
By: To Destroy A City
Released 18 November 2014
(c) TDAC (p) n5music (BMI) 2014
FORMAT [ CD ] [ VINYL ] & [ MP3 ]
Distribution Line [ BANDCAMP ] & [ N5MD ]
[ SUNLESS “FULL ALBUM REVIEW” COMING SOON ]

< < < < < [ [ FACEBOOK ] | [ 2014 TOP ALBUM ] | [ BANDCAMP ] | [ n5MD ] ]. > > > > >
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To Destroy A City - Sunless

Artist – To Destroy A City
Album – Sunless [ * * * * * * * * * * ]
Release Date – 2014
Genre – Ambient, Instrumental, Experimental, Post-rock [ EPIC TO THE POWER OF 10 ]

Tracklist

1. The Messenger 07:16
2. Theta 03:46
3. Stand Before Me 05:17
4. Escape / Return 05:36
5. Last Contact 07:54
6. First Light 05:45
7. Understanding in the Between 07:38
8. Daylight Station 05:51 | 9. Visionaries 09:56
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To Destroy A City – Sunless
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Artist – To Destroy A City
Album – Rebuild
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Instrumental Post-rock

Tracklist

01 – March [solar fields]
02 – Goodbye, Dear Friend [dalot]
03 – Narcotic Sea [boy is fiction]
04 – Metaphor [m. szarejko]
05 – Philosophy Of A Knife [connectedness locus]
06 – Goodbye, Dear Friend [winterlight] | 07 – March [lights out asia]
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To Destroy A City – Rebuild
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To Destroy A City - Live at Lincoln Hall, Chicago IL

Artist – To Destroy A City
Album – Live at Lincoln Hall, Chicago IL – 1​/​28​/​2012
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Ambient, Instrumental, Post-rock, Soundscape, Ambientscape [ EXCELLENT ]

Tracklist

1. Intro 03:25
2. Narcotic Sea 06:06
3. Ilium 05:38
4. Philosophy of a Knife 06:43
5. Before the Outside’s Gone 05:24
6. The Marvels of Modern Civilization 02:44
7. Goodbye, Dear Friend 07:27 | 8. March 03:49
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FREE To Destroy A City – Live at Lincoln Hall, Chicago IL – 1​/​28​/​2012
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Artist – To Destroy A City
Album – To Destroy A City [ * * * * * * * * * * ]
Release Date – 2011
Genre – Ambient, Instrumental, Post-rock, Soundscape, Ambientscape [ EXCELLENT ]

Tracklist

1. Metaphor 02:55
2. Narcotic Sea 06:14
3. Ilium 05:33
4. Philosophy Of A Knife 06:27
5. Before The Outside’s Gone 06:24
6. The Marvels Of Modern Civilization 02:39
7. Goodbye, Dear Friend 07:02 | 8. March 04:00
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To Destroy A City – To Destroy A City
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To Destroy A City
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BOOOOOOOM!: Michelle Fleck

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Paintings by San Francisco-based artist Michelle Fleck (previously featured here). Several of these works are up on Buy Some Damn Art right now. See more below.

View the whole post: Michelle Fleck over on BOOOOOOOM!.

BOOOOOOOM!: Skate Video of the Day: Skateboarding in Portugal’s Côa Museum

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Part skate video, part architecture video. Featuring skateboarder Jorge Simões and architecture by Camilo Rebelo and Tiago Pimentel. Watch the video below.

View the whole post: Skate Video of the Day: Skateboarding in Portugal’s Côa Museum over on BOOOOOOOM!.

BOOOOOOOM!: Animated Gifs by Japanese Illustrator Daisuke Nimura

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Terrific animated gifs by Japanese illustrator Daisuke Nimura. More below.

View the whole post: Animated Gifs by Japanese Illustrator Daisuke Nimura over on BOOOOOOOM!.

TheSirensSound: Other People

Other People Profile

A lot has happened since Jakob Lindhagen, then using this cryptic moniker “…”, self-released his critically acclaimed solo debut  “Transcendence” in 2009. The immediately recognizable cinematic qualities in the remarkably mature instrumental compositions from the then twenty-year-old caught the attention of several creative forces around the world. Filmaker Ahang Bashi hand-picked the song ‘Waking Up’ for her award-winning documentary “paradise” (“The Paradise”), and subsequently hired Lindhagen to compose original music for her upcoming film “Nair Allt Faller Samman” (“When Everything Falls Apart”). Also New York-based production company “PCI Media Impact”, reaching out millions of viewers, had him write a score for their animated promotion film, as well as a wide variety of commissioned work, both nationally and internationally.

Now, under the name “Other People”, Lindhagen returns with “Somewhere Far Away”, moving away from multi-layered productions of his previous effort, and instead strapping himself behind a grand piano. Recorded in his two latest cities of residence – Sydney, Australia and Stockholm, Sweden – its modern minimalism showcases a unique talent for creating atmospheres combined with exquisite melodies, with a light touch but a seemingly endless emotional depth.

“Somewhere Far Away” is an album of subtlety. Subtle, in how sudden dissonances and key or time signature changes levitate the music to another level, without taking away focus from the composition in itself. Subtle, in how additional instruments occasionally join in. Subtle, in how something as sparse as the intimate melodies and delicately balanced dynamic shifts in his playing seem to be telling more than a thousand stories at once.

Apart from being released digitally and with a limited physical run, a unique collaboration with artist Erik Odqvist is also being made, with Odqvist creating three different interpretations of the album, available as highly limited screen prints with a download code printed on the back.

< < < < < [ [ BANDCAMP ] [ FACEBOOK ] [ SOUNDCLOUD ] [ SPOTIFY ] ]. > > > > >
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Other People - Somewhere Far Away

Artist – Other People
Album – Somewhere Far away [ * * * * * ]
Release Date – 2014
Genre – Instrumental, Contemporary-classic, Piano, Experimental [ EXQUISITE ]

Tracklist

01 Somewhere Far Away
02 Still Worth A Lot To Someone
03 The Ventriloquist
04 Fumbling In The Dark
05 PS
06 ID
07 Ego
08 Super Ego
09 Sleepless
10 Coda
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Other People – Somewhere Far Away
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Other People
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TheSirensSound: RÁDIO ETIÓPIA – THE.”A” MIX

By Appointment to Her Majesty the Queen and to Their Late Majesties King George VI, King Edward VII, King William IV, King George V, Queen Victoria, King George IV and to His Late Royal Higness The Prince of Wales ( 1921-1936)

»»»

TONY JUSTERINI and ANATOLY BROOKS are the co-founders of Rádio Etiópia. New episodes are posted every Monday set completed apart from the mainstream line of music.

»»»

Intro voice led by Ana Ribeiro

»»»

Special Guests:

- ELDER ALMEIDA – 1st FRIDAY
– PAULINO – 2nd FRIDAY
– FRAY D. JAY – 3rd FRIDAY
– JOÃO H – 4th FRIDAY
– JOSÉ RAMÓN – SOMETIMES

< < < < < [ [ .COM ] | [ PODCAST ] | [ FACEBOOK ] | [ PHASE 108.1 ] ]. > > > > >

RE

THE.”A” MIX
A Fray D. Jay mix for Rádio Etiópia

Tracklist

01. Awaken the Echoes – It All Starts Here;
02. Alucidnation – One Zero Two (03.51);
03. Agnes Obel – Arches (06.37);
04. Asura – Lonely Star (09.44);
05. Craig Armstrong (feat. Brett Anderson) – Crash (16.46);
06. Aeron – Harbour (20.06);
07. All India Radio – Let Me Remain (23.42);
08. Akira Kosemura – Tale (27.31);
09. Anjou – Readings (29.11);
10. Asphalt Ribbons – Strong Hands (35.49);
11. Antonymes – 281210 (40.01);
12. Auburn Lull – Van Der Graaf (41.52);
13. David Ackles – Lotus Man (47.03);
14. Axs – Static Space (49.43);
15. Arcade Fire – Sleepwalker (54.39);
16. Aes Dana – In Between (57.36);
17. Tori Amos – Rattlesnakes (64.32);
18. Air – The Dream of Yi (69.45); | 19. Aless – Honeyed (75.01)
>>>>
Total Running Time: 79.59
Sultry voice of Radio Etiopia – Ana Ribeiro
>>>>>
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STREAM RÁDIO ETIÓPIA – THE.”A” MIX
DIRECT DOWNLOAD RÁDIO ETIÓPIA – THE.”A” MIX
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TheSirensSound: The Kiss That Took A Trip

The Kiss That Took A Trip Profile

Formed in Madrid in 2006, The Kiss That Took A Trip is the brainchild of M.D. Trello, who stands as the sole member and admitted factotum. A long-in-the-works musical project that finally saw the light of day when Trello, after an extended period of hesitation, decided to embrace public exposition inspired by the DIY ethos of diverse musical figures such as Steve Albini, Trent Reznor and Godspeed You! Black Emperor.

A late in the game “band”, the founder of The Kiss quotes his admired Brian Eno to state he’s not a musician at all and therefore he will never tour. The Kiss That Took A Trip builds its music, for the most part, using computers and synthetic sounds, but refusing vehemently to be categorized as electronic music. In fact, the music can be tagged as a mix of styles such as post-rock, ambient, experimental, new age and orchestral pop, most of them instrumental and imbued with a progressive feel. The songs resort to melody, atmosphere and a pinch of drone and dissonance instead of technical proficiency or radio-friendly formats.

Since its inception, The Kiss has been regularly putting out self-made releases, with the EP Dating Aphrodite (2008) and the albums Worst Case Scenarios (2009) and The Dummy Family (2011) among them. However, it was with its third album How The Mighty Have Fallen (2012) that The Kiss found an unique voice. Fully produced by Trello, the album bases its sound on long-winded ambient/jazzy suites and unravels with no sense of urgency but employing signature changes, breakdowns, drone sections, distortion and hummed vocals reminiscent of Bark Psychosis. Letting go of the political themes a little, the album has a bitter existentialist vibe this time.

After a two year long gap, The Kiss That Took A Trip returns with Electroforest (2014), loosening a lot of tension on the listener and making an album that recaptures much of the essential sense of melody found in earlier works, while still keeping the epic scope and adventurous nature of the previous album, coming out of the other side of the tunnel with a “best of both worlds” effort, but with its own internal logic. The record is built in a subtle triptych structure and features the boldest use of vocals found on a work by The Kiss, even to the point of putting them in the forefront or having them from beginning to end, like in standard pop songs.

In the album, as in past releases, The Kiss leaves a breadcrumb trail of sounds that may lead the listener to The Kiss’ biggest musical influences: Talk Talk, Friends Of Dean Martinez, Penguin Cafe Orchestra, Mogwai, Mike Oldfield, His Name Is Alive, Can, Rush, Barry Adamson or Angelo Badalamenti, only that distortion is turned up a notch or two, placing The Kiss That Took A Trip in a not very crowded musical niche in which progressive music and mainstream appeal meet but don’t clash.

DISCOGRAPHY

2014 – [ Electroforest ]
2014 – [ Goodbye Horses ]
2012 – [ How The Mighty Have Fallen ]
2012 – [ Fangs ]
2011 – [ Renaissance ‘2011 ]
2011 – [ The Dummy Family ]
2011 – [ The Geneve Fires ]
2009 – [ Google The One You Love ]
2009 – [ Worst Case Scenarios ]
2009 – [ Hi, America! ]
2008 – [ Dating Aphrodite ]
2007 – [ Always In The Wrong Mood ]
2007 – [ 2007 Untitle Single ] | 2006 – [ 2006 Untitle Single ]

Regarding ideology, The Kiss That Took A Trip operates on a “pay only if you wish” policy and stands for free music and Creative Commons licensing. The band has no other aim but to build a consistent and lasting music catalog that can speak to people fed up with quick consumption music and looking for high replay value and a more immersive and personal experience.

Electroforest
By: The Kiss That Took A Trip
Released: November 04th 2014
Available In [ DIGITAL ] and [ CD ]
Distribution Line [ BANDCAMP ]
ELECTROFOREST “REVIEW” COMING SOON

< < < < < [ [ BANDCAMP ] | [ FACEBOOK ] ]. > > > > >
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Electroforest

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Electroforest [ * * * * * ]
Release Date – 2014
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

01. Electroforest: entrance 02:38
02. Tidy up you pig 04:24
03. Champions of delay 04:36
04. Vanilla killer 05:26
05. Greatest loves are secret 04:25
06. Electroforest: detour 02:19
07. Jammed drainpipe blues 04:48
08. Snowstorm 07:01
09. Malice 05:46
10. Flower of gas and smoke 07:36
11. Electroforest: tree of lights 03:27
12. Jackie o lantern 04:28
13. The thriving landlords 06:45
14. Amplification of the senses 04:30
15. Happy birthday party monster 03:50
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Electroforest
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Goodbye Horses

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Goodbye Horses
Release Date – 2014
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Goodbye horses 06:59
2. Immune to friendship 06:22
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Goodbye Horses
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - How The Mighty Have Fallen

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – How The Mighty Have Fallen
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

01. Xenia, Ohio 09:55
02. Sleeping on the railroad 07:39
03. Fangs 06:30
04. Fugu 07:43
05. Black nectar 10:08
06. Let it rot 09:04
07. Amethyst 07:55
08. Meat ain’t murder 07:46
09. Three girls 05:54
10. Le temps detruit tout 04:42
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – How The Mighty Have Fallen
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Fangs

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Fangs
Release Date – 2012
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Fangs 06:30
2. Stock footage 06:28
3. Fangs (carpathian chill out mix) 08:14
4. Fangs (kick the bucket mix) 05:34
5. Fangs (video edit) 05:07
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Fangs
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Renaissance '2011

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Renaissance ‘2011
Release Date – 2011
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Renaissance ‘2011 04:54
2. Wounded naked woman 04:38
3. Birth and death of Jonah Two 09:18
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Renaissance ‘2011
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - The Dummy Family

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – The Dummy Family
Release Date – 2011
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

01. The condition of greed [no rant mix] 03:16
02. Wounded naked woman 04:38
03. House of the scantily clad 05:00
04. Pillars of creation 06:48
05. Son of fireworks 03:43
06. La dee da (…we sing as they crush us) 05:54
07. The chatter 02:01
08. The Geneve fires 05:18
09. Birth and death of Jonah Two 09:18
10. White cells and other pains 05:52
11. This place is dead 03:27
12. Too little too late 04:23
13. Burning chariot down a hill 07:00
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – The Dummy Family
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - The Geneve Fires

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – The Geneve Fires
Release Date – 2011
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. The Geneve fires 05:18
2. The day the dogs went mad 05:59
3. Aokigahara (sea of trees) 04:28
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – The Geneve Fires
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Google The One You Love

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Google The One You Love
Release Date – 2009
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Google the one you love 06:24
2. Nefarious 03:17
3. God found dead 03:50
4. Between attitude and pose 03:44
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Google The One You Love
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Worst Case Scenarios

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Worst Case Scenarios
Release Date – 2009
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

01. [king’s piss… the beggar’s song] 01:56
02. Yours is a fitting name 04:57
03. This is the furthest I’ve been from you 04:31
04. Mary Ward 06:01
05. Hi America! 05:58
06. Google the one you love 06:24
07. One trick pony 04:35
08. [king’s piss… the rally anthem] 01:56
09. City in decay 08:25
10. The atheists lament 04:35
11. Tiananmen 04:00
12. Demerol 04:29
13. Who goes there…? 10:54
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Worst Case Scenarios
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Hi, America!

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Hi, America!
Release Date – 2009
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Hi, America! 05:58
2. Gone the way of flesh 04:32
3. (Heads shaking in) Disbelief [internet edit] 03:30
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Hi, America!
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Dating Aphrodite

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Dating Aphrodite
Release Date – 2008
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Binary soul [radio edit] 06:14
2. Morbid christmas, year 2012 04:45
3. Finders keepers 05:02
4. Mercury ceilings (Requiem for Europe) 02:27
5. My days are numbered 07:15
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Dating Aphrodite
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - Always In The Wrong Mood

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – Always In The Wrong Mood – Vol I
Release Date – 2007
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

01. Death and synaesthesia 01:20
02. The widows 05:05
03. Black knee 02:31
04. Goodbye K. Wallenda 02:48
05. Complex flowers 02:02
06. So this darkness is for real 02:56
07. Welcome (to wherever we are) 01:15
08. Dance of the ghost kids, pt. 1 01:51
09. Henrietta 03:30
10. Dance of the ghost kids, pt. 2 00:40
11. Named after a star / Terrible flashback 01:51
12. March of the defeated 03:13
13. (silence track) 00:18
14. (silence track) 00:18
15. (silence track) 00:18
16. (silence track) 00:18
17. (silence track) 00:18
18. (silence track) 00:18
19. (silence track) 00:18
20. (silence track) 00:18
21. Oblique hope (waltz) 01:29
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – Always In The Wrong Mood VOL I
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - 2007 untitled single

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – 2007 Untitled Single
Release Date – 2007
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Backdrop of stars 05:10
2. The pinnacle 03:35
3. Cinema vérité 03:52
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – 2007 Untitled Single
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The Kiss That Took A Trip - 2006 untitled single

Artist – The Kiss That Took A Trip
Album – 2006 Untitled Single
Release Date – 2006
Genre – Ambient, Electronic, Shoegaze-like, Soundscape [ TOTALLY AWESOME ]

Tracklist

1. Renaissance 07:11
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The Kiss That Took A Trip – 2006 Untitled Single
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The Kiss That Took A Trip
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Open Culture: Stephen Fry Reads You Have To F**king Eat, the New Mock Children’s Book by Adam Mansbach

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0Vou9-Z0Is

The sequel to Adam Mansbach’s best-selling mock children’s book, Go the F**k to Sleep is out. Say hello to You Have to F**king Eat.

As mentioned last week, you can download a free audio version read by Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston over at Audible.com through December 12th. This week, we present a slightly more posh version read by Stephen Fry — the very same Stephen Fry who narrated the UK version of the Harry Potter series, not to mention an audio version of Oscar Wilde’s children’s story “The Happy Prince.”  Find more Fry favorites below.

Related Content:

Stephen Fry: What I Wish I Knew When I Was 18

Stephen Fry Explains Humanism in 4 Animated Videos: Happiness, Truth and the Meaning of Life & Death

Shakespeare’s Satirical Sonnet 130, As Read By Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry Reads You Have To F**king Eat, the New Mock Children’s Book by Adam Mansbach is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post Stephen Fry Reads You Have To F**king Eat, the New Mock Children’s Book by Adam Mansbach appeared first on Open Culture.

Penny Arcade: Comic: Small Packages

New Comic: Small Packages

The Half-Dipper: An Interview

Disquiet: Disquiet Junto Project 0151: Reliving Dead

20141120-notld

Each Thursday in the Disquiet Junto group on SoundCloud.com and at Disquiet.com, a new compositional challenge is set before the group’s members, who then have just over four days to upload a track in response to the assignment. Membership in the Junto is open: just join and participate.

This assignment was made in the evening, California time, on Thursday, November 20, with 11:59pm on the following Monday, November 24, 2014, as the SoundCloud deadline — though the encouraged optional video part of the assignment can wait a day or two longer, if necessary.

These are the instructions that went out to the group’s email list (at tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto):

Disquiet Junto Project 0151: Reliving Dead
The Assignment: Score a segment of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead using the movie’s audio as source material.

Step 1: Download the classic film Night of the Living Dead, which is in the public domain, at the following URL:

http://goo.gl/rm1lMy

Step 2: Locate a short segment of interest, between 1 and 3 minutes, in which there is no musical score present.

Step 3: Compose a score for your chosen segment using only the audio from that segment as the source material. You can alter the source audio in any way you choose. You just can’t add any new sounds.

Step 4: Upload the finished track to the Disquiet Junto group on SoundCloud.

Step 5: Listen to and comment on tracks uploaded by your fellow Disquiet Junto participants.

Step 6: This part is optional, and you can take an additional couple of days if you need them. Upload the video segment combining the original audio and your score, and link to it from the notes field in your SoundCloud track.

Length: Your finished work should be between 1 and 3 minutes long, depending entirely on the length of the segment you selected.

Deadline: This assignment was made in the evening, California time, on Thursday, November 20, with 11:59pm on the following Monday, November 24, 2014, as the deadline.

Upload: Please when posting your track on SoundCloud, only upload one track for this assignment, and include a description of your process in planning, composing, and recording it. This description is an essential element of the communicative process inherent in the Disquiet Junto.

Title/Tag: When adding your track to the Disquiet Junto group on Soundcloud.com, please include the term “disquiet0151-relivingdead” in the title of your track, and as a tag for your track.

Download: It is preferable that your track is set as downloadable, and that it allows for attributed remixing (i.e., a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution).

Linking: When posting the track, please be sure to include this information:

More on this 151st Disquiet Junto project — “Score a segment of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead using the movie’s audio as source material” — at:

http://disquiet.com/2014/11/20/disquiet0151-relivingdead/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

http://disquiet.com/junto

Join the Disquiet Junto at:

http://soundcloud.com/groups/disquiet-junto/

Disquiet Junto general discussion takes place at:

http://disquiet.com/forums/

Image from the George Romero film Night of the Living Dead.

The Geomblog: Open access, ACM and the Gates Foundation.

Matt Cutts, in an article on the new Gates Foundation open access policy (ht +Fernando Pereira) says that
while the ACM continues to drag its heels, the Gates Foundation has made a big move to encourage Open Access...
Which got me thinking. Why can't the ACM use this policy as a guidelines to encourage open access ? Specifically,

  • Announce that from now on, it will subsidize/support the open access fees paid by ACM members
  • (partially) eat the cost of publication in ACM publications (journals/conferences/etc)
  • Use the resulting clout to negotiate cheaper open access rates with various publishers in exchange for supporting open access fees paid to those journals. 
Of course this would put the membership side of ACM at odds with its publication side, which maybe points to another problem with ACM having these dual roles.

The Gutters: Know Your Audience

gutters556 colours

I have one question, and one question only when it comes to the return of Aquaman’s mother:

Why do she and Mera appear to be the same age?

Aside from that though, it’s just common courtesy when letting the world know you have good news to be sure and share it with the right people. So, in that light, I know you Gutters Faithful are the right people for me to share this bit of news with:

Our amazing colorist, Ed has recently launched a kickstarter to get some cash for a project he and Gutters Alum Jeff Dabu have put together. It’s called Season of The S.H.A.R.K. and it looks pretty badass! You can check out the campaign here along with a preview of issue #1! I highly urge you to throw a few bucks at this, not only because Ed’s the best, but because Jeff Dabu is a stellar artist and they are offering some very cool rewards!

So with that said, I’m going to start a weekend.

Today’s page comes to us from the one and only Doug Hills:

Doug Hills has been drawing comics for himself and for others since about 2001. He has also dabbled in writing guide books about the art program, Manga Studio. He wrote Manga Studio For Dummies in 2008, and is currently working on a new book covering Manga Studio 5. Doug is the artist/co-creator of the webcomics Place Name Here and Chibi Cheerleaders From Outer Space (with his wife, Stacey Hills). He has worked on several independent comics, including the short story King Pete (with Josh Flanagan and Jordan Boyd), and a four-issue series currently in development, Dixon’s Notch (with Josh Flanagan and Charles Pritchett) and is a founding member of Ten Ton Studios. Doug was also a professional wrestler at one point in his life.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

-Moss

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights): The Munk Debates: A More Dangerous Place?

Is American foreign policy making the world a more dangerous place? That's the question participants discuss in the most recent Munk Debates. On the "yes" side: Bret Stephens and Robert Kagan. On the "no" side: Fareed Zakaria and Anne-Marie Slaughter.

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal (updated daily): November 21, 2014


Kerpow!

Perlsphere: Email::MIME::Kit v3 will fix-and-or-break your code

Ever since its early releases, Email::MIME::Kit had a big problem. It screwed up encodings. Specifically, imagine this manifest (I'm kinda skipping some required junk):

  # manifest.yaml
renderer: TemplateToolkit
headers:
  - Subject: "Message for [% name %]"
alternatives:
  - type: text/plain
    path: body.txt
  - type: text/html
    path: body.html

The manifest turns into a data structure before it's used, and the subject header is a text string that, later, will get encoded into MIME encoded-words on the assumption that it's all Unicode text.

The files on disk are read with :raw, then filled in as-is, and trusted to already be UTF-8.

If your customer's name is Распутин, strangely enough, you're okay. The header handling encodes it properly, and the wide characters (because Cyrillic codepoints are all above U+00FF) turn into UTF-8 with a warning. On the other hand, for some trouble, consider Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason. All those codepoints are below U+0100, so the non-ASCII ones are encoded directly, and you end up with =C6 (Æ) in your quoted-printable body instead of =C3=86 (Æ UTF-8 encoded).

Now, you're probably actually okay. Your email is not correct, but email clients are good at dealing with your (read: my) stupid mistakes. If your email part says it's UTF-8 but it's actually Latin-1, mail clients will usually do the right thing.

The big problem is when you've got both Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason and Распутин both in your email. Your body is a mish mash of Latin-1 and UTF-8 data.

In Email::MIME::Kit v3, templates (or non-template bodies) loaded from disk are — if and only if they're for text/* parts — decoded into text and then, when the email is assembled, it's encoded by Email::MIME's usual header_str handling.

There's a case where this can start making things worse, rather than better. If you know that templates in files are treated as bytes, you might be passing in strings pre-encoded into UTF-8. If that was the case, it will now become mojibake.

Finally, plugins that read kit contents for uses as text will need upgrading. The only one I know of like this is my own Email::MIME::Kit::Assembler::Markdown. I will fix it. The trick is: look at what content-type is being built and consider using get_decoded_kit_entry instead of get_kit_entry.

I think this is an important change, and worth the breakage. Please look at your use of EMK and test with v3.

Open Culture: Mahatma Gandhi’s List of the 7 Social Sins; or Tips on How to Avoid Living the Bad Life

gandhi-social-sins

In 590 AD, Pope Gregory I unveiled a list of the Seven Deadly Sins – lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride – as a way to keep the flock from straying into the thorny fields of ungodliness. These days though, for all but the most devout, Pope Gregory’s list seems less like a means to moral behavior than a description of cable TV programming.

So instead, let’s look to one of the saints of the 20th Century — Mahatma Gandhi. On October 22, 1925, Gandhi published a list he called the Seven Social Sins in his weekly newspaper Young India.

  • Politics without principles.
  • Wealth without work.
  • Pleasure without conscience.
  • Knowledge without character.
  • Commerce without morality.
  • Science without humanity.
  • Worship without sacrifice.

The list sprung from a correspondence that Gandhi had with someone only identified as a “fair friend.” He published the list without commentary save for the following line: “Naturally, the friend does not want the readers to know these things merely through the intellect but to know them through the heart so as to avoid them.”

Unlike the Catholic Church’s list, Gandhi’s list is expressly focused on the conduct of the individual in society. Gandhi preached non-violence and interdependence and every single one of these sins are examples of selfishness winning out over the common good.

It’s also a list that, if fully absorbed, will make the folks over at the US Chamber of Commerce and Ayn Rand Institute itch. After all, “Wealth without work,” is a pretty accurate description of America’s 1%. (Investments ain’t work. Ask Thomas Piketty.) “Commerce without morality” sounds a lot like every single oil company out there and “knowledge without character” describes half the hacks on cable news. “Politics without principles” describes the other half.

In 1947, Gandhi gave his fifth grandson, Arun Gandhi, a slip of paper with this same list on it, saying that it contained “the seven blunders that human society commits, and that cause all the violence.” The next day, Arun returned to his home in South Africa. Three months later, Gandhi was shot to death by a Hindu extremist.

Related Content:

Albert Einstein Expresses His Admiration for Mahatma Gandhi, in Letter and Audio

Mahatma Gandhi Talks (in First Recorded Video)

Jonathan Crow is a Los Angeles-based writer and filmmaker whose work has appeared in Yahoo!, The Hollywood Reporter, and other publications. You can follow him at @jonccrow. And check out his blog Veeptopus, featuring lots of pictures of vice presidents with octopuses on their heads.  The Veeptopus store is here.

Mahatma Gandhi’s List of the 7 Social Sins; or Tips on How to Avoid Living the Bad Life is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post Mahatma Gandhi’s List of the 7 Social Sins; or Tips on How to Avoid Living the Bad Life appeared first on Open Culture.

BOOOOOOOM!: Vancouver + New York: A Good Book Drive

agoodbookdrive

Heads up to everyone living in Vancouver and New York, the annual event known as A Good Book Drive is currently running until the end of the month in both cities. The project is a simple way to encourage a new generation of readers and to get good books into the hands of kids who need new ones.

All you have to do is buy a copy of your favourite kid’s book and drop it off at one of the drop-off sites. At each site they will give you a giant sticker to put inside the front cover, to be used to write a special note to the kid that will receive your book.

If you follow them on Instagram you’ll be able to see what book I donated when it gets shared there (should be soon).

See a full list of Vancouver and New York drop-off locations below!

View the whole post: Vancouver + New York: A Good Book Drive over on BOOOOOOOM!.

Quiet Earth: ROBOPOCALYPSE Writer Sells Sci-fi Survival Story, Brad Pitt to Executive Produce

The big screen adaption of Daniel H. Wilson's "Robopocalypse" (by none other than Steven Speilberg) may well be on hold but that doesn't mean that Wilson is done in Hollywood. Far from it.

News today is that Wilson has sold an original idea to Brad Pitt's Plan B. Not a lot of information is available on Alpha but THR reports "it is known to be sci-fi survival story that has shades of Jack London."

So basically, a sci-fi survival story. Not exactly new ground for Wilson.

In addition to the announcement of the project, which Wilson will also write, it was confirmed that Canadian director Anthony Scott Burns will make his feature film debut with the project. Burns is a commercial director w [Continued ...]

Explosm.net: 11.21.2014

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic.

churchturing.org / 2014-11-23T08:12:57