Slashdot: Florida Man Sues Apple For $10+ Billion, Says He Invented iPhone Before Apple

An anonymous reader writes from a report via MacRumors: A Florida resident that goes by the name of Thomas S. Ross has filed a lawsuit against Apple this week, claiming that the iPhone, iPad, and iPod infringe upon his 1992 invention of a hand-drawn "Electronic Reading Device" (ERD). The court filing claims the plaintiff was "first to file a device so designed and aggregated," nearly 15 years before the first iPhone. MacRumors reports: "Between May 23, 1992 and September 10, 1992, Ross designed three hand-drawn technical drawings of the device, primarily consisting of flat rectangular panels with rounded corners that "embodied a fusion of design and function in a way that never existed prior to 1992." Ross applied for a utility patent to protect his invention in November 1992, but the application was declared abandoned in April 1995 by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office after he failed to pay the required application fees. He also filed to copyright his technical drawings with the U.S. Copyright Office in 2014. While the plaintiff claims that he continues to experience "great and irreparable injury that cannot fully be compensated or measured in money," he has demanded a jury trial and is seeking restitution no less than $10 billion and a royalty of up to 1.5% on Apple's worldwide sales of infringing devices." MacRumors commenter Sunday Ironfoot suggests this story may be "The mother of all 'Florida Man' stories." Apple has been awarded a patent today that prohibits smartphone users from taking photos and videos at concerts, movies theaters and other events where people tend to ignore such restrictions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Recent additions: servant-github 0.1.0.4

Added by finlay, Tue Jun 28 23:48:20 UTC 2016.

Bindings to GitHub API using servant.

Recent additions: test-fixture 0.3.1.0

Added by lexi_lambda, Tue Jun 28 23:47:43 UTC 2016.

Test monadic side-effects

MetaFilter: Like a warm hug made of syrup and pie...

From Extra Crispy: 50 of the Best (Non-Chain) Diners in the US.

Bonus: Not a Fieri in sight.

MetaFilter: A Movable Feast

Artist Minsu Kim uses synthetic biology to create food that wiggles, waves, and pulsates on the plate.

Slashdot: RIP Xbox Fitness: Users Will Soon Lose Access To Workout Videos They Bought

insitus quotes a report from Ars Technica: Xbox users who purchased training videos through the Xbox Fitness app probably thought they were buying a workout program they'd be able to use regularly for the life of the Xbox One, at the very least. Instead, those videos will soon be completely unavailable to those who paid for them up front, according to a "sunset" plan announced by Microsoft yesterday evening. Xbox Fitness first launched in late 2013 with the console, offering a Kinect-powered health app that uses the 3D camera to evaluate users' form as they perform the exercises demoed by on-screen video trainers. The app, which provided 30 basic routines for free with an Xbox Live Gold account, will be coming to an end on December 15. The paid content associated with the app will also no longer be available for purchase, and those who purchased it previously will be able to use it for over one more year before the app becomes completely unavailable to download or use on July 1, 2017. What some have found especially upsetting with the news is that Microsoft has yet to announce any plans to compensate users who have paid for content or to provide downloadable versions of paid workouts that can be used after the phase-out date. Thus, many upset users have taken to the sunset announcement post and various other outlets to speak their mind on the situation. "I bought 140$+ worth of content just this year... I don't want a refund, I want to be able to continue to use what I PAID for !!!!!!!!!!!" Xbox Live user QuickSilver wrote.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Colossal: A Fascinating 3D-Printed Light-Based Zoetrope by Akinori Goto

Media artist Akinori Goto designed this fun 3d-printed zoetrope that when lit from the side reveals dancing or walking people. The piece was just on view at the Spiral Independent Creators Festival where it won both the Runner-up Grand Prix and the Audience Award. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

zoetrope-1

zoetrope-2

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Stolen moments

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Excellent

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Vienna

Bifurcated Rivets: From FB

Check your partners

MetaFilter: The Surprising History of the Infographic

Clive Thompson and Smithsonian magazine bring us a history of data visualization, including classics from Florence Nightingale to the red-and-blue state divide. Via Kottke.

Recent additions: servant-github 0.1.0.3

Added by finlay, Tue Jun 28 22:50:04 UTC 2016.

Bindings to GitHub API using servant.

Slashdot: DoNotPay Bot Has Beaten 160,000 Traffic Tickets -- and Counting

Khari Johnson, writing for VentureBeat:A bot made to challenge traffic tickets has been used more than 9,000 times by New Yorkers, according to DoNotPay maker Joshua Browder. The bot was made available to New Yorkers in March. In recent years and decades, residents of The Big Apple have seen a persistent increase in traffic fines. A record $1.9 billion in traffic fines was issued by the City of New York in 2015. Since the first version of the bot was released in London last fall, 160,000 of 250,000 tickets have been successfully challenged with DoNotPay, Browder said. "I think the people getting parking tickets are the most vulnerable in society," said Browder. "These people aren't looking to break the law. I think they're being exploited as a revenue source by the local government." Browder, who's 19, hopes to extend DoNotPay to Seattle this fall.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Slashdot: Micro-Camera Can Be Injected With A Syringe -- May Pose Surveillance Concerns

Taco Cowboy quotes a report from ABC Online: German engineers have created a camera no bigger than a grain of salt that could change the future of health imaging -- and clandestine surveillance. Using 3D printing, researchers from the University of Stuttgart built a three-lens camera, and fit it onto the end of an optical fiber the width of two hairs. Such technology could be used as minimally-intrusive endoscopes for exploring inside the human body, the engineers reported in the journal Nature Photonics. The compound lens of the camera is just 100 micrometers (0.1 millimeters) wide, and 120 micrometers with its casing. It could also be deployed in virtually invisible security monitors, or mini-robots with "autonomous vision." The compound lens can also be printed onto image sensor other than optical fibers, such as those used in digital cameras. The researchers said it only took a few hours to design, manufacture and test the camera, which yielded "high optical performances and tremendous compactness." They believe the 3D printing method -- used to create the camera -- may represent "a paradigm shift."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Data Structure Visualization

submitted by /u/SakishimaHabu
[link] [comments]

Hackaday: One Man’s Journey To Build Portable Concrete 3D Printer Produces Its First Tiny House

[Alex Le Roux] want to 3D print houses.  Rather than all the trouble we go through now, the contractor would make a foundation, set-up the 3D printer, feed it concrete, and go to lunch.

It’s by no means the first concrete printer we’ve covered, but the progress he’s made is really interesting. It also doesn’t hurt that he’s claimed to make the first livable structure in the United States. We’re not qualified to verify that statement, maybe a reader can help out, but that’s pretty cool!

The printer is a very scaled gantry system. To avoid having an extremely heavy frame, the eventual design assumes that the concrete will be pumped up to the extruder; for now he is just shoveling it into a funnel as the printer needs it. The extruder appears to be auger based, pushing concrete out of a nozzle. The gantry contains the X and Z. It rides on rails pinned to the ground which function as the Y. This is a good solution that will jive well with most of the skills that construction workers already have.

Having a look inside the controls box we can see that it’s a RAMPS board with the step and direction outputs fed into larger stepper drivers, the laptop is even running pronterface. It seems like he is generating his STLs with Sketch-Up.

[Alex] is working on version three of his printer. He’s also looking for people who would like a small house printed. We assume it’s pretty hard to test the printer after you’ve filled your yard with tiny houses. If you’d like one get in touch with him via the email on his page. His next goal is to print a fully up to code house in Michigan. We’ll certainly be following [Alex]’s tumblr to see what kind of progress he makes next!


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, home hacks

search.cpan.org: Class-Hook-0.04

Add hooks on methods from other classes

MetaFilter: Place your cat in front of the screen

Cat Game: Mouse Hunt (SLYT)

MetaFilter: In Training, photographs of bonsai trees

In Training, photographs of bonsai trees [via mefi projects]

"A few years ago, I began photographing bonsai trees as a personal project. Fast forward two years later, I have a beautifully-designed book of my photos I'd love to share. I wasn't sure why, but I felt a deep, visceral connection to these ancient trees. The bonsai, themselves, seemed the very opposite of the subjects I usually photographed - they stood before me fully present, their sense of time measured in decades, even centuries. From my first glimpse of the trees all those years ago, I knew implicitly that there was something to be learned from them, from their endurance and quiet dignity."

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Why doesn't Mark Dean get the same recognition as Alan Turing in computer science

Mark Dean created the computer....he created 3 of the original 9 patents and IBM

yet Turing seems to get the spotlight more

is their racial reasons, because Dean is a black man that he doesn't get the same recognition

submitted by /u/thunderking500
[link] [comments]

search.cpan.org: Test-MockPackages-0.7

Mock external dependencies in tests

Slashdot: Researchers Find Game-Changing Helium Reserve In Tanzania

An anonymous reader writes from a report via CNN: Helium is an incredibly important element that is used in everything from party balloons to MRI machines -- it's even used for nuclear power. For many years, there have been global shortages of the element. For example, Tokyo Disneyland once had to suspend sales of its helium balloons due to the shortages. The shortages are expected to come to an end now that researchers from Oxford and Durham universities have discovered a "world-class" helium gas field in Tanzania's East African Rift Valley. They estimate that just one part of the reserve in Tanzania could be as large as 54 billion cubic feet (BCf), which is enough to fill more than 1.2 million medical MRI scanners. "To put this discovery into perspective, global consumption of helium is about 8 billion cubic feet (BCf) per year and the United States Federal Helium Reserve, which is the world's largest supplier, has a current reserve of just 24.2 BCf," said University of Oxford's Chris Ballentine, a professor with the Department of Earth Sciences. "Total known reserves in the USA are around 153 BCf. This is a game-changer for the future security of society's helium needs and similar finds in the future may not be far away," Ballentine added.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

search.cpan.org: CPAN-Meta-2.150008-TRIAL

the distribution metadata for a CPAN dist

search.cpan.org: Parse-CPAN-Meta-1.4421

Parse META.yml and META.json CPAN metadata files

Instructables: exploring - featured: Switch Access with Makey Makey

This two switch system uses a lap tray (I used this one from IKEA), conductive material (I used aluminum and copper tape but you can always use good old kitchen aluminum foil), duct tape, and a Makey Makey to create a touch only switch. The system can then be used to activate games on switch develop...
By: loretod

Continue Reading »

Quiet Earth: STALKER Remake in the Works at WGN

WGN is bringing another adaptation of the 1972 short sci-fi novel "Roadside Picnic", written by Russian authors Arkady and Boris Strugatskys. You may remember that Andrei Tarkovsky adapted the work in the 70's in the post-apocalyptic film, Stalker.


Starring in the series is Matthew Goode (The Imitation Game, Match Point) who plays Redrick “Red” Shuhart in the story about what becomes of earth following a visit from extraterrestrial beings.


About the story:
Roadside Picnic is a work of fiction based [Continued ...]

search.cpan.org: Struct-Path-PerlStyle-0.20

Perl-style syntax frontend for L.

Recent additions: beam-th 0.1.0.0

Added by hesiod, Tue Jun 28 20:27:07 UTC 2016.

Template Haskell utilities for beam

programming: JVM JIT optimization techniques - part 2

submitted by /u/dodiehun
[link] [comments]

Recent additions: hs-popen 0.1.0.0

Added by deech, Tue Jun 28 20:08:42 UTC 2016.

Bindings to C pipe functions.

Planet Haskell: Roman Cheplyaka: Install Fedora Linux on an encrypted SSD

I just replaced the SSD in my laptop with a bigger one and installed a fresh Fedora Linux on it, essentially upgrading from F23 to F24.

Here are a few notes which could be useful to others and myself in the future.

Verifying the downloaded image

How do you verify the downloaded image? You verify the checksum.

How do you verify the checksum? You check its gpg signature.

How do you verify the authenticity of the gpg key? You could just check the fingerprint against the one published on the website above, but this is hardly better than trusting the checksum, since they both come from the same source.

Here’s a better idea: if you already have a Fedora system, you have the keys at /etc/pki/rpm-gpg.

In my case, I imported /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-fedora-24-primary (yes, my F23 system already contained the F24 signing keys), and was able to check the checksum signature.

This protects you against a scenario when getfedora.org is compromised and the checksums/signatures/keys are replaced there.

Installing from a USB partition

Turned out the only optical disc in my house was damaged, and I didn’t have a USB stick big enough to burn the Fedora image either.

I did have an external USB drive with some free space on it, but it contained a lot of data, so I couldn’t just make it one big ISO partition.

There are several instructions on how to create bootable USB partitions, but most of them look fragile and complicated.

Luckily, Fedora makes this super easy.

  1. Install the RPM package livecd-tools (which is a packaged version of this repo)
  2. Create a partition big enough for the ISO and format it. Unlike many other instructions that tell you to use FAT, this one works with ext[234] just fine.
  3. livecd-iso-to-disk Fedora-Workstation-Live-x86_64-24-1.2.iso /dev/sdb1

Setting up disk encryption

I was impressed by how easy it was to set up full disk encryption. I just checked the box “Encrypt my data” in the installer, and it used a very sensible partitioning scheme close to what I used to set up manually before:

  • Unencrypted /boot partition
  • Encrypted partition with LVM on top of it
    • Three logical volumes on the encrypted LVM: root, /home, and swap.

The only thing that I had to do was to enable TRIM support:

  1. For LVM: set issue_discards = 1 in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf.
  2. For cryptsetup: change none to discard in /etc/crypttab.
  3. Enable weekly trims systemctl enable fstrim.timer && systemctl start fstrim.timer

Hackaday: Inside the Supplyframe Design Lab on Opening Night

Last week the Supplyframe Design Lab in Pasadena opened it’s doors, welcoming in the community to explore the newly rebuilt interior which is now filled with high-end prototyping and fabrication tools and bristling with work areas to suit any need. I had a chance to pull a few people aside during the opening night party to talk about how the Design Lab came about and what we can expect coming out of the space in the near future.

Opening night was heavily attended. I recognized many faces, but the majority of those exploring the building were new acquaintances for me. This is likely due to a strong connection the Design Lab is building with the students, faculty, and graduates of the ArtCenter College of Design. Located just down the road, it is one of the top design schools in the world.

Cory Grosser (left) the architect for the Supplyframe Design Lab
Cory Grosser (left) the architect for the
Supplyframe Design Lab

Supplyframe was founded in Pasadena and when building a creative space in town it makes perfect sense to reach out and embrace everything that is happening at that school. Cory Grosser, the architect behind this project is a graduate of ArtCenter. What he accomplished with the Design Lab space is a testament to the sort of talent the school is known for. It will attract designers who will work beside engineers (and yes even hardware hackers) and surely lead to collaborations that will go beyond what could have been accomplished separately. After all, you can have the best electronic device in the world but a crude-looking enclosure is an uphill battle for widespread adoption. The same can be said for great design that doesn’t have the hardware to hold it up.

Resident Engineer Dan Hienzsch (left) answers questions in the rapid prototyping room
Resident Engineer Dan Hienzsch (left) answers
questions in the rapid prototyping room

Getting people into the same place is just the first step. The next is to break down any barriers to building their wildest dreams. Having amazing tools on hand is one part of that, but you also need people who know how to use the tools and have the fabrication expertise to boot. The Design Lab has a full-time resident engineer, Dan Hienzsch, responsible for the space, the tools, and the creative process within.

Dan is a jack of all trades and a great personality. For the last several months he has been working on installing and calibrating all the equipment in the lab. For rapid prototyping this includes a couple of SeeMeCNC Rostock Max V2 delta 3D Printers, a trio of Deezmaker Bukito printers, a Stratasys Objet24 print, and an Epilog Helix laser cutter. For electronics prototyping, the space offers Othermill milling machines for routing PCBs, and an assembly and testing area packed full of great bench tools. The heavy equipment room includes a Tormach PCNC 1100 milling machine, a ShopBot PRSAlpha for milling full sheets of material, and a full set of woodworking tools. Of course there are beefy workstations with design software ready for the CAD work needed to leverage all of the CNC goodness.

Which brings us to the question of who is going to use this space? I met two of the residents at the opening, both are extremely excited to get into the space and begin their residencies. That is just a few days away as their three-month tenure begins on Friday. Ben will be furthering his Perceptoscope project which will result in a mixed-reality installation in the form factor of one of those coin-operated binoculars found at scenic tourist areas. Tim builds synthesizers and will be putting the heavy tools to good use as he prototypes new interfaces for his latest project called NanoEgg. I bumped into them hanging out together at the party, already riffing on each others’ ideas.

The place was packed! Great food and drink for the occasions Haningout between a Shopbot and a Tormach All ages were in attendance Chalk artist Moe Notsu at work during Opening Night Sophi Kravitz designed the Residency program

There were a number of people asking in the comments of last week’s post what the residents “give up in exchange for” the residency program. I asked Aleksandar Bradic, the CTO of Supplyframe, about that during the video interview above, and you should listen to his response. The short answer is: nothing. Also in the video above is Cory Grosser’s explanation that the space is set up to present “making as theater”. The story of those residencies is what is coming out of this space. Showing what you are working on during development, and working to inspire others to take on their own creation is the tradeoff for three months in this amazing place. And there’s a monthly stipend to help offset your costs. If this sounds like your cup of tea, you can still apply for a residency.

Sophi Kravitz put in a lot of work to design the Residency Program. She has a background as an artist and that space has proven that residencies are great for everyone. Modeling the concept in a hardware space helps realize the idea that hardware creation is art. In addition to this long-term arrangement, I think the Supplyframe Design Lab has set itself up to attracting creative people for shorter events. During the day, the lab is for the residents, but on the evenings and weekends the space has a larger purpose. I hope to see leaders in art, design, electronics, and many other fields participate by presenting lectures, workshops, and demonstrations. The artist — Moe Notsu — working in chalk on the walls of the space during opening night was a pleasant surprise, and just proves the potential to find interesting people on hand bringing the building to life. Check out a time-lapse video of the chalk art just after the image gallery below.

Raw elements like exposed brick and original windows Joan Horvath and whosawhatsis at the opening The lighting design adds much to the feel of the space Chris Gammell at the opening Tic-Tac-Toe build using Design Lab tools


Filed under: Featured, Hackerspaces

ScreenAnarchy: New York Asian 2016 Review: WHAT A WONDERFUL FAMILY! Mixes Broad Comedy with Ozu's Legacy

Yôji Yamada is a director known for retreading and reusing elements, both visual and in terms of plot, being the director of many series of movies that have been done across decades. While he really hasn't made a new series since the end of his Samurai Trilogy in 2006, he has recently favored the family chamber drama above any other, and in particular, he has decided to make countless references to the cinema of Yasujiro Ozu, being his most blatant a remake of the classic Tokyo Story, made in 2013 as Tokyo Family, which could be described as an homage as well as a demonstration of how little has changed in 60 years of Japanese family life. In his latest film, Yamada goes right into...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

BOOOOOOOM!: Illustrator Spotlight: Lee Kyutae

Lee-kyutae1

Gorgeous drawings by illustrator Lee Kyutae. More images below.

Colossal: Technicolor Rainbow Tape Floor Installations by Jim Lambie

Collectively titled Zobop, Jim Lambie's vinyl tape installations mark off floors and stairs with colorful and repeating patterns, typically consisting of seven to nine rotating hues. The site-specific works conform to the architectural outline of each space, tracing the sharp edges of moulding or square bases of monumental columns. To begin each new work Lambie first outlines the widest possible edge, typically starting where the floor meets the wall. From here, he alternates widths for his lines, mixing up thin strips with those that are a couple of inches thick until he reaches the center of each space.

Lambie’s first work in Zobop was completed in 1999 during a solo exhibition of the same name at The Showroom in London. Since this first exhibition, Lambie has continued to make the concentric works, using materials that could be easily accessed at any office supply store. You can see more of his colorful installations at Anton Kern Gallery. (via Contemporary Art Blog)

Image via My Pet Buffalo

Image via My Pet Buffalo

lambie-new-1

lambie-new-2

All Content: #279 June 28, 2016

Sheila writes: Terrence Malick has spent his career capturing the beauty of waving treetops, sunsets, reflections on water, shadows and sunlight. Vugar Efendi has put together a beautiful and hypnotic video, weaving together the natural scenes in Malick’s films. You can see the video below. Roger Ebert, of course, paid close attention to Malick's films over the years, "Badlands," (in his Great Movies collection),  "Days of Heaven" , "The Thin Red Line", "The New World", "The Tree of Life", and finally "To the Wonder", the last review Roger wrote. Those who found "Badlands" and "Days of Heaven" unforgettable had to endure a long wait for Malick's next film, "The Thin Red Line," and then an even longer wait (20 years!) for "The New World." Malick's films are always events. In Roger's review for "Days of Heaven," he wrote: "This is a movie made by a man who knew how something felt, and found a way to evoke it in us." Efendi's video evokes it yet again.
 

NATURE THROUGH MALICK from Vugar Efendi on Vimeo.



Trailers


Eight Days A Week (2016) Directed by Ron Howard. A compilation of found footage featuring music, interviews and stories of the Beatles 250 concerts from 1963 to 1966. Opens in US theaters on September 16, 2016.



American Pastoral (2016). Directed by Ewan McGregor. Written by John Romano , based on the novel by Philip Roth). Starring Dakota Fanning, Jennifer Connelly, Ewan McGregor. Synopsis: Set in postwar America, a man watches his seemingly perfect life fall apart as his daughter's new political affiliation threatens to destroy their family. Opens in US theaters on October 28, 2016.



Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016). Written and directed by Edward Zwick. Starring Tom Cruise, Cobie Smulders, Robert Knepper . Synopsis: Jack Reacher returns to the headquarters of his old unit, only to find out he's now accused of a 16-year-old homicide. Opens in US theaters on October 21, 2016.



The Lovers & the Despot (2016). Written and directed by Ross Adam, Robert Cannan . Synopsis: After the collapse of their glamorous romance, a famous director and actress are kidnapped by movie-obsessed dictator Kim Jong-il. Forced to make films in the world's weirdest state, they get a second chance at love, but only one chance at escape. Opens in US theaters on September 23, 2016.



American Honey (2016). Written and directed by Andrea Arnold. Starring Sasha Lane, Shia LaBeouf, McCaul Lombardi . Synopsis: A teenage girl with nothing to lose joins a traveling magazine sales crew, and gets caught up in a whirlwind of hard partying, law bending and young love as she criss-crosses the Midwest with a band of misfits. Release dates TBD.



All Eyez on Me (2016).  Directed by Benny Boom. Written by  Ed Gonzalez, Jeremy Haft .  Starring Demetrius Shipp Jr., Danai Gurira, Kat Graham . Synopsis: A chronicle of the life of rapper Tupac ShakurRelease dates TBD.



Mechanic: Resurrection (2016).  Directed by Dennis Gansel. Written by Philip Shelby , Tony Mosher. Starring Jason Statham, Jessica Alba, Tommy Lee Jones . Opens in US theaters on August 26, 2016.



The Queen of Spain (2016). Written and directed by Fernando Trueba . Starring Penélope Cruz, Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin . Synopsis: A sequel to Trueba’s 1998 “The Girl Of Your Dreams,” with Cruz playing a Spanish movie star. Here, she returns to her roots in Madrid while making a big-budget Hollywood movie.



Denial (2016). Directed by Mick Jackson. Writtne by David Hare. Starring Rachel Weisz, Andrew Scott, Timothy Spall . Synopsis: Acclaimed writer and historian Deborah E. Lipstadt must battle for historical truth to prove the Holocaust actually occurred when David Irving, a renowned denier, sues her for libel. Opens in US theaters on September 30, 2016.



Keeping Up With the Joneses (2016). Directed by Greg Mottola. Written by Michael LeSieur . Starring Isla Fisher, Gal Gadot, Jon Hamm. Synopsis: A suburban couple becomes embroiled in an international espionage plot when they discover that their seemingly perfect new neighbors are government spies. Opens in US theaters on October 21, 2016.



Almost Christmas (2016). Written and directed by David E. Talbert. Starring Jessie T. Usher, Gabrielle Union, Danny Glover . Synopsis: A dysfunctional family gathers together for their first Thanksgiving since their mom died. Opens in US theaters on November 11, 2016.



Theo Who Lived (2016). Written and directed by David Schisgall. Synopsis:  In the late fall of 2012, Theo Padnos, a struggling American journalist, slipped into Syria to report on the country’s civil war and was promptly kidnapped by Al Qaeda’s branch in Syria. Here, he recounts his story. Opens in US theaters on September 30, 2016.



Éternité (2016). Written and directed by Tran Anh Hung. Starring Audrey Tautou, Bérénice Bejo, Mélanie Laurent. Synopsis: The story of the women and relationships that define a family across a century. Release dates TBD.



War On Everyone (2016). ** Red Band Trailer ** Written and directed by John Michael McDonagh. Starring  Michael Peña, Alexander Skarsgård, Theo James, Tessa Thompson. Synopsis: Two corrupt cops in New Mexico set out to blackmail and frame every criminal unfortunate enough to cross their path. Things take a sinister turn, however, when they try to intimidate someone who is more dangerous than they are. Or is he? Release dates TBD.



David Brent: Life on the Road (2016). Written and directed by Ricky Gervais. Starring Ricky Gervais, Tom Bennett, Jo Hartley . Synopsis: A camera crew catches up with David Brent, the former star of the fictional British series, "The Office" as he now fancies himself a rockstar on the road. Opens in the UK on August 19, 2016. US release dates TBD.



Barry Lyndon (1975) ** Restoration/re-release trailer **  Written and directed by Stanley Kubrick (based on novel by William Makepeace Thackeray) Starring Ryan O'Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee . Restoration released into U.K. cinemas on July 29th. Other release dates TBD.



Anthropoid (2016). Directed by Sean Ellis. Written by Sean Ellis, Anthony Frewin . Starring Cillian Murphy, Charlotte Le Bon, Jamie Dornan. Synopsis: Based on the extraordinary true story of Operation Anthropoid, the WWII mission to assassinate SS General Reinhard Heydrich, the main architect behind the Final Solution and the Reich's third in command after Hitler and Himmler. Opens in US theaters on August 12, 2016.



Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru (2016). Directed by Joe Berlinger. Synopsis: Feature documentary film about internationally renowned life and business strategist Tony Robbins that goes behind the scenes of his mammoth seminar "Date With Destiny," attended by over 2,500 people in Boca Raton, Florida, each year. Premieres on Netflix on July 15, 2016.



Roger Ebert's Birthday


Sheila writes: Roger's birthday was on June 18th, and Rogerebert.com paid tribute in a series of essays written by Rogerebert.com contributors. You can check them all out via the Table of Contents. Chaz Ebert wrote a touching tribute (with accompanying video-essay by Far Flung Correspondent Krishna Shenoi) called Happy Birthday, Roger Ebert, My Superhero.

Paul Cox: 1940-2016


Sheila writes: Director Paul Cox, regular guest at Ebertfest, including the most recent festival, died on June 18, 2016 (Roger's birthday, an uncanny moment of symmetry). Peter Sobczynski has written a beautiful tribute to Cox, one of Roger's favorite artists. Chaz Ebert has also written a tribute, including an article from 2009: "I can respect the stupidity of people who think that speed is beauty," agrees Paul Cox. Here's a list of all of Roger's reviews of Cox's films. In his review of Cox's 2002 film "Innocence," Roger wrote, "Paul Cox's "Innocence" is like a great lifting up of the heart. It is all the more affirming because it is not told in grand phony gestures, but in the details of the daily lives of these two people. Life accumulates routines, obligations, habits and inhibitions over the years, and if they are going to face their feelings then they're going to have to break out of long, safe custom and risk everything."


Free Movies


Three Guys Named Mike (1951). Directed by Charles Walters. Starring Jane Wyman, Van Johnson, Howard Keel . Synopsis: A stewardess becomes romantically involved with an airline pilot, a college professor, and a successful businessman, all of whom are named Mike. When the three find out about each other, she has to decide which one she loves the most.

Watch "Three Guys Named Mike."



Glorifying the American Girl (1929). Directed by Millard Webb. Starring Mary Eaton, Eddie Cantor, Helen Morgan . Synopsis: The rise of a showgirl, Gloria Hughes, culminating in a Ziegfeld extravaganza "Glorifying the American Girl".

Watch "Glorifying the American Girl."



Shanks (1974). Directed by William Castle. Starring Marcel Marceau, Tsilla Chelton, Philippe Clay . Synopsis: A mute puppeteer uses a deceased scientist's invention to control dead bodies like puppets.

Watch "Shanks."



All Content: Book Review: "The Art & Making of Independence Day: Resurgence"

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With a second-place finish in its opening weekend to “Finding Dory,” a lower opening frame than the original did in 1996 dollars ($41 million vs. $50 million), and less critical support (34% on Rotten Tomatoes vs. 62% for the original), one has to consider Roland Emmerich’s “Independence Day: Resurgence” something of a disappointment. So, there are two ways to approach Titan Books’ coffee-table book “The Art & Making of Independence Day: Resurgence.” One, it’s important to look at it in light of the movie's fans—the people in that 34% and the non-critics who enjoyed this summer blockbuster sequel. Does it work for them? Does it offer honest insight and interesting detail behind the process of making the film? Two, does it offer any signposts as to “what went wrong”? Could someone pick up “The Art & Making of Independence Day: Resurgence” and learn from it? The answer to the initial “fan service” question is disappointing. This book is pretty light in terms of process, especially when compared to better Titan Books offerings. However, it’s kind of a fascinating volume regarding how the production team approached the project and the impact their decisions made.

One of the things that charmed people about “Independence Day,” and still does to this day, is how much of it felt tactile, due to the use of practical effects and stunt work. The new movie has been compared to a video game with its complete, end-of-the-world destruction and nothing real to hold on to—a notable problem in the blockbusters of the mid-‘10s, during which we’ve become somewhat numb to the apocalypse. And so Emmerich’s introduction is interesting when he talks about how “Independence Day” was a “fun, un-cynical event” and that “We shot everything in-camera on the first film. The dogfights, for instance, were second unit and very time-consuming, taking 3-4 weeks. This time the dogfights took 3-4 days on bluescreen. It was fast, really fast, which is more fun for the actors.” Say what? Yes, there’s something to be said for actors having fun, quick production times (Emmerich’s next graf is about how the production came in just over 75 days), but where is the passion that true filmmakers seek to pass to their viewers? How is anything about fast shoots related to a continuation of something that was “fun”? It offers proof that Emmerich and company approached “Resurgence” from a different mindset. Sure, technology has changed in the last 20 years, but shouldn’t the main purpose have been to recreate some of the joy of the original?

I also find it interesting that the first THIRD of this book, over 50 pages, is devoted to the original “Independence Day." It’s incredibly thin material—old stills we’ve seen a hundred times, followed by a few random bits of trivia. You’re really just reliving what you liked about the first one, and not even learning anything new about how it was made, or why it has lasted for two decades. I’d love a book that focuses on how “Independence Day” changed the blockbuster or why it’s remained such a popular film. But you can’t just half-heartedly fold that into the opening of this book.

How’s the meat of the collectible volume? It’s OK. I’ll admit that I haven’t gotten around to seeing “Resurgence” yet—they didn’t screen it for critics—but I’ve seen enough of these books that I can tell when they’re not quite digging deep into the making of the film. You’ll see a lot of the same stills (often from different angles) and concept art, and an abundance of photos instead of actual text. This is one of those books for diehard fans only, and even they are unlikely to learn anything new. While people still talk about “Independence Day” twenty years later, this volume's discussion about its sequel feels thin only a few days after release.

All Content: Thumbnails 6/28/16

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1.

"Aziz Ansari: Why Trump Makes Me Scared for My Family": Essential commentary from the "Master of None" creator at The New York Times.

“Xenophobic rhetoric was central to Mr. Trump’s campaign long before the attack in Orlando. This is a guy who kicked off his presidential run by calling Mexicans ‘rapists’ who were ‘bringing drugs’ to this country. Numerous times, he has said that Muslims in New Jersey were cheering in the streets on Sept. 11, 2001. This has been continually disproved, but he stands by it. I don’t know what every Muslim American was doing that day, but I can tell you what my family was doing. I was studying at N.Y.U., and I lived near the World Trade Center. When the second plane hit, I was on the phone with my mother, who called to tell me to leave my dorm building. The haunting sound of the second plane hitting the towers is forever ingrained in my head. My building was close enough that it shook upon impact. I was scared for my life as my fellow students and I trekked the panicked streets of Manhattan. My family, unable to reach me on my cellphone, was terrified about my safety as they watched the towers collapse. There was absolutely no cheering. Only sadness, horror and fear. Mr. Trump, in response to the attack in Orlando, began a tweet with these words: ‘Appreciate the congrats.’ It appears that day he was the one who was celebrating after an attack.”

2.

"The Communal Magic of Filmfront": At Indie Outlook, I interview the programmers of an excellent cine-club located in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood.

“‘When you start mixing all these different forms, you occasionally get some angry responses,’ said Alan. ‘But it’s good because you can’t leave here angry. You have to talk it out.’ One of the most memorable conversations at Filmfront took place after a screening of John Ford’s relatively obscure 1934 film, ‘Judge Priest.’ Will Rogers stars as the titular judge, a Confederate veteran who defends a black man (Stepin Fetchit) accused of stealing chickens. Though the two men become friends, Fetchit ends up as a servant in Rogers’ house, working alongside his maid (played by—who else?—Hattie McDaniel). The picture ends with everyone breaking out into a dixie tune that reaffirms their nostalgia for the bygone Confederacy. ‘When you watch a film like that in a room of this size, you can sense the unease,’ said Rudy. Though the film provoked some enraged responses from audience members, Malia finds tremendous worth in screening a film like this, and not just because Ford is one of her favorite filmmakers. Young cinephiles have often dismissed the work of a director like Ford for not being politically correct, yet his portrayal of antiquated roles based in racism and inequality expresses a great deal about American culture. If nothing else, interesting conversations were spawned by the film, which Malia found much more rewarding than a unanimous thumbs up from viewers. ‘It’s a film made in the 1930s about the 1890s and we’re watching it in 2016,’ said Malia. ‘These are levels of history and time that you have to consider and that are important in different ways.’”

3.

"Martin Scorsese on 'The King of Comedy''s Modern Relevance: 'There Are So Many Ruperts Around Us'": In conversation with our own Simon Abrams at Vanity Fair.

“[Vanity Fair:] ‘You’ve said that Rupert Pupkin is sort of like a younger version of you inasmuch as he is as driven, or perhaps obsessed with succeeding at any costs. Before you started shooting the film, you and Robert De Niro talked to some photographers and autograph collectors in order to get a better hand on the character. Did you see yourself in these obsessed fans?’ [Martin Scorsese:] I didn’t really understand where I stood in relationship to the film, the story, Rupert Pupkin, and Jerry Langford, too, until I was in the process of making the film—the shooting, the editing. I don’t think I necessarily liked what I found. What I mean is: I saw myself in Rupert, on the surface, as somebody that came from that appreciation of early television of the 50s—particularly New York variety comedy shows. Steve Allen, Jack Paar. These personalities were so vivid and so strong that they became something very new to me. I really appreciated that part of what I guess you’d call ‘show business.’ That part of me is there in Rupert, there is no doubt. Over the years, I began to realize how genuine and how serious my involvement in ‘The King of Comedy’ was. De Niro noticed that connection in Paul Zimmerman’s script first. De Niro was also more aware of autograph people and the idolization for the sake of idolization of celebrities. I understand that now, but I stumbled my way through it each day back then. Being around Jerry Lewis helped. He was an idol of mine, and represented all aspects of American show business, which meant a lot to me. [‘King of Comedy’] is about a certain aspect of our culture, and also about not taking yourself too seriously, even though I do. All of that came out during the making of the film.’”

4.

"Less cash, fewer movies, meltdown: how Brexit may affect British film": According to The Guardian's Andrew Pulver.

“Brexit will hinder British producers’ ability to sell their products in a giant trading area. As a group of big-cheese producers pointed out before the vote, ‘our feature films, our television programmes and our games can travel far more easily across borders because they are not subject to quotas or taxes of any kind in Europe.’ Over the past decade, around 40% of the UK’s film exports have been to the EU; jobs, companies and livelihoods depend on it. And just as UK cinemas can access the Europa Cinemas network to get subsidies to show European films, EU cinemas get the same funding to show British films. The free-trade zone isn’t always lovely, however: the recently announced plan to create a digital single market has inspired considerable protest, amid fears it could shut down the same outfits it claims to support. If Brexit goes ahead and funds dry up, things will undoubtedly get tricky. One producer described it to me as ‘a critical blow,’ another as ‘terrible news ... making the UK even more of a pariah.’ The question is: will the slowdown be temporary, or are we in for a two-decade fallow period comparable to the Hollywood pullout of the early 70s? Back then, the number of UK production starts crashed under the pressure of falling audiences, competition from TV and the disappearance of Hollywood funding as studios ended their practice of subcontracting production overseas in favour of retrenching in California. Despite occasional mini-renaissances – usually around individual companies, such as Goldcrest – it took two decades for a concerted revival to occur. It could happen again.”

5.

"'Whether It Takes One Camera or 12': TV Director Anthony Hemingway on 'Underground' and 'The People v. O.J. Simpson": Another fine interview conducted by Jim Hemphill at Filmmaker Magazine.

“[Filmmaker:] ‘I want to start by talking about ‘Underground,’ which I think is one of the most visually dynamic and dramatically intense series on television right now. The two go hand in hand – the material is inherently riveting, which motivates some really powerful framing choices on your part, which in turn further intensify the drama. I’m thinking, for example, of the way you open the series with the runaway slave fleeing through the woods; you employ a number of visual devices to ratchet up the tension very, very quickly. Could you talk about what kinds of choices you’re making in a scene like that?’ [Anthony Hemingway:] ‘It was a mutual feeling and decision among the creative team to be bold at every turn. The story’s narrative runs the course of extremes, so it was important for me to play in the dichotomy of extremes visually. My inspiration always starts from the page, and writers Misha Green and Joe Pokaski very dynamically set a high bar that challenged me to step up to the plate and swing for a home run. We wanted a visual experience that was relevant, cutting edge, energetic and urgent, which would give viewers a different entry point into a period and narrative that was entertaining and compelling. I’m not a fan of possessiveness, but my DP (laughs) Kevin McKnight and I have so much synchronicity when it comes to the cinematography and how it supports story themes and character arcs. Ultimately, I wanted the visceral ‘edge of your seat’ viewing experience that would prevent anyone from changing the channel until the last credit rolled.’”

Image of the Day

CityLab's Kriston Capps explores why the "Psycho" mansion is "now on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art."

Video of the Day

Filmmaker Kentucker Audley presents a satirical video essay on 1996's "Independence Day."

ScreenAnarchy: Edinburgh 2016: Taika Waititi's HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE Wins On Final Day Of Festival

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2016 wrapped up over the weekend with a screening of its Closing Film and the announcement of the event’s final prize: the Audience Award. Fittingly Gillies MacKinnon’s warm-hearted and whiskey-soaked remake of Alexander Mackendrick’s Ealing Comedy classic Whiskey Galore played out the festival, while a man who’s carving out his own niche in classic comedies took the Award. Taika Waititi’s Hunt for the Wilderpeople proved a firm favorite with critics and audiences alike. Starring Sam Neill as a grizzled loner forced to go on the run with a young tear away, the exceptional Julian Dennison. The film is both hilarious and touching throughout and fully deserves the praise it has received. Other entries to score highly in the public vote included...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

Hackaday: Reverse Engineering Quadcopter Protocols

Necessity is the mother of invention, but cheap crap from China is the mother of reverse engineering. [Michael] found a very, very cheap toy quadcopter in his local shop, and issued a challenge to himself. He would reverse engineer this quadcopter’s radio protocol. His four-post series of exploits covers finding the right frequency for the radio, figuring out the protocol, and building his own remote for this cheap toy.

[Michael] was already familiar with the capabilities of these cheap toys after reading a Hackaday post, and the 75-page, four language manual cleared a few things up for him. The ‘Quadro-Copter’ operated on 2.4GHz, but did not give any further information. [Michael] didn’t know what channel the toy was receiving on, what data rate, or what the header for the transmission was. SDR would be a good tool for figuring this out, but thanks to Travis Goodspeed, there’s a really neat trick that will put a 2.4GHz nRF24L01+ radio into promiscuous mode, allowing [Michael] to read the transmissions between the transmitter and quadcopter. This code is available on [Michael]’s github.

A needle in an electromagnetic haystack was found and [Michael] could listen in on the quadcopter commands. The next step was interpreting the ones and zeros, and with the help of a small breakout board and soldering directly to the SPI bus on the transmitter, [Michael] was able to do just that. By going through the nRF24 documentation, he was able to suss out the pairing protocol and read the stream of bytes that commanded the quadcopter.

What [Michael] was left with is a series of eight bytes sent in a continuous stream from the transmitter to the toy. These bytes contained the throttle, yaw, pitch, roll, and a ‘flip’ settings, along with three bytes of ‘counters’ that didn’t seem to do anything.  With that info in hand, [Michael] took an Arduino Nano, an nRF04L01+ transceiver, and a Wii nunchuck to build his own transmitter. If you’re looking for a ‘how to reverse engineer’ guide, it generally doesn’t get better than this.

You can check out a video of [Michael] flying his Wiimoted quadcopter below.


Filed under: slider, toy hacks, wireless hacks

programming: D3 4.0 released

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ScreenAnarchy: Top Thirteen Films of Maria Bava

Top Thirteen Films of Mario Bava “Movies are a magician's forge, they allow you to build a story with your hands--at least, that's what it means to me. What attracts me in movies is to be presented with a problem and be able to solve it. Nothing else; just to create an illusion, an effect, with almost nothing.” –Mario Bava      Mario Bava was born on July 31, 1914 in the coastal northern Italian town of San Remo.  His father was a cinematographer in the early days of Italian cinema.  Bava made his film debut in the early 1940’s working on films that featured such names as Gina Lollobrigida, Steve Reeves and Aldo Fabrizi.  Bava was thrust into the position of director when then current...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

ScreenAnarchy: FAN CUONG: Watch The Full Trailer For Vietnamese Rock And Roll Time Travel Comedy

Call Charlie Nguyen's upcoming Fan Cuong the reverse Back To The Future. There's no going to hte past to get people together here, nope. Instead, in Fan Cuong, long haired rock and roll fan played by comedian Thai Hoa must travel back in time to prevent the singer of the most important band in Vietnamese history (Johnny Tri Nguyen) from abandoning it all for a woman. The solution, of course, is to land the woman before the singer can. It's a phenomenally silly premise from the entire creative team behind martial arts hit The Rebel and, true to form where these guys are concerned, the production value is absolutely top notch. We shared the first teaser a while back and that has now been followed...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

Instructables: exploring - featured: Willow Firewood Tote

Carrying firewood to a stove, one piece at a time, is just a waste of time. I wanted to build a simple firewood carrier from materials around my home that was functional, and pleasing to look at. I made this green willow firewood tote and believe it covers all these bases. Materials 2 - 48 inch...
By: notsosharp

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Open Culture: Hear Young Bob Dylan, Before Releasing His First Album, Tell Amazing Tales About Growing Up in a Carnival

Back in 2012, we featured a young Bob Dylan talking and playing on The Studs Terkel radio show in 1963. Open Culture’s Mike Springer prefaced the interview with these words, “Dylan had just finished recording the songs for his second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, when he traveled from New York to Chicago to play a gig at a little place partly owned by his manager, Albert Grossman, called The Bear Club. The next day he went to the WFMT studios for the hour-long appearance on The Studs Terkel Program. Most sources give the date of the interview as April 26, 1963, though Dylan scholar Michael Krogsgaard has given it as May 3.” In talking with Studs, Dylan told some tall tales (scholars say) about his youth, ones that would have made Huckleberry Finn proud. And that tendency to create an alternative biography is on display again in an even earlier interview, dating back to March 11, 1962.



Animated by Blank on Blank above, the (excerpted) interview lets us hear Dylan, only 20 years old, before the release of his eponymous debut album, and before achieving any kind of fame. Young Dylan tells Cynthia Gooding, host of the “Folksinger’s Choice” radio program in NYC, about the six years he spent with the carnival.

I was with the carnival off and on for about six years… I was clean-up boy, I used to be on the main line, on the ferris wheel, uh, do just run rides. I used to do all kinds of stuff like that… And I didn’t go to school a bunch of years and I skipped this and I skipped that.

Later he continued:

I wrote a song once. I’m trying to find, a real good song I wrote. An’ it’s about this lady I knew in the carnival. An’ er, they had a side show, I only, I was, this was, Thomas show, Roy B Thomas shows, and there was, they had a freak show in it, you know, and all the midgets and all that kind of stuff. An’ there was one lady in there really bad shape. Like her skin had been all burned when she was a little baby, you know, and it didn’t grow right, and so she was like a freak. An’ all these people would pay money, you know, to come and see and … er … that really sort of got to me, you know. They’d come and see, and I mean, she was very, she didn’t really look like normal, she had this funny kind of skin and they passed her of as the elephant lady. And, er, like she was just burned completely since she was a little baby, er.

You can hear a nearly complete audio recording of the interview (55 minutes) below, and read a transcript of the full interview on Expecting Rain.

Over on Spotify, you can hear the 11 songs that Dylan played for Gooding that day.

They include several that Dylan wrote, along with some old folk and blues songs:

  1. “(I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle” (Hank Williams/Jimmie Davis)
  2. “Fixin’ to Die” (Bukka White)
  3. “Smokestack Lighning” (Howlin’ Wolf)
  4. “Hard Travelin'” (Woody Guthrie)
  5. “The Death of Emmett Till”  (Bob Dylan)
  6. “Standing on the Highway” (Bob Dylan)
  7. “Roll on John” (Rufus Crisp)
  8. “Stealin'” (traditional)
  9. “It Makes a Long Time Man Feel Bad” (traditional)
  10. “Baby, Please Don’t Go” (Big Joe Williams)
  11. “Hard Times in New York Town” (Bob Dylan)

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Related Content:

Two Legends Together: A Young Bob Dylan Talks and Plays on The Studs Terkel Program, 1963

Bob Dylan Reads From T.S. Eliot’s Great Modernist PoemThe Waste Land

Bob Dylan & The Grateful Dead Rehearse Together in Summer 1987: Hear 74 Tracks

Hear Young Bob Dylan, Before Releasing His First Album, Tell Amazing Tales About Growing Up in a Carnival is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

ScreenAnarchy: The Frog Man Cometh In Trailer For MUSEUM: THE SERIAL KILLER IS LAUGHING IN THE RAIN

Acclaimed - but little known outside of Japan - manga Museum: The Serial Killer Is Laughing In The Rain is the subject of an up coming live action adaptation in its native land and while the source material may be little known in this part of the world there are plenty of intriguing elements to draw attention to the film. The story here revolves around a police detective on the trailer of a mysterious frog-masked serial killer who becomes aware that his wife is likely an upcoming target. Oguri Shun - a frequent Miike Takashi collaborator - takes on the detective role while director Otomo Keishi made this his follow up film to the massive worldwide success of his Rurouni Kenshin live action adaptations. But...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

Instructables: exploring - featured: Alohomora :: Unlock The Door

Talking about wizard, the first thing comes to my mind is "Magic Wand". Reading the "Wizarding Contest" at Instructables makes me thinking if I can combine the old magic wand to the new digital world of robot or electronics. For celebrating Harry Potter's birthday, here I present the magic charm to ...
By: chienline

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Hackaday: Retrotechtacular: ASCII Art in the 19th Century

Computer graphics have come a long way. Some video games today exceed what would have passed for stunning cinema animation only a few years ago. However, it hasn’t always been like this. One of the earliest forms of computer-generated graphics used text characters to draw on printers.

snoopy-calendarEarly computer rooms were likely to have a Snoopy character on green and white fan-fold paper. Calendars with some artwork were also popular (see left, and find out about the FORTRAN that created it, if you like). Ham radio operators who use teletypes (RTTY, in ham parlance) often had vast collections of punched tape that held artwork. Given that most hams in the 1950s and 1960s were men and the times were different, a lot of them were more or less “R” rated.

nixonNot all of them were, though. For example, Richard Nixon was decidedly “G” rated (see right). Simple pictures would use single characters, but sophisticated ones would use the backspace character to overprint multiple characters.

Ham Radio Art

You often hear this described as ASCII art, today, although hams usually use 5-bit BAUDOT code, so that’s a misnomer for those images, at least. Of course, today, people aren’t keen on storing roll after roll of paper tape (or even owning a tape reader) so there have been several projects to capture this art in a more modern format.

Although there is still some RTTY art activity, picture sending has been mostly replaced by slow scan TV (SSTV) which sends actual still images or other modes like FAX. Some of the newer digital modes even have the ability to send pictures. You can be discussing your radio for example, and then show the other ham a photo of the radio.

Modern Art

There’s no shortage of modern ASCII art. If you think about it, the text-based emoticons (like :-), for example) are one line ASCII art. Most of us know simple ones, but if you look around you can find an airplane:  ‛¯¯٭٭¯¯(▫▫)¯¯٭٭¯¯’

Or maybe you’d prefer a robot:

c[○┬●]כ

If you prefer a famous robot, try this:

¦̵̱ ̵̱ ̵̱ ̵̱ ̵̱(̢ ̡͇̅└͇̅┘͇̅ (▤8כ−◦

had600There are web sites that will easily convert images to ASCII. For example, the Hackaday logo turns into an ASCII image nicely (see left).

You can find many collections on the web (including some with tutorials), of course. If you want to draw something from scratch, I wrote something back in 2002 you might enjoy called ASCIICad (see below, to left).

Then again, since it is so easy to create them, a static picture isn’t as exciting as it used to be. If you feel that way, perhaps you’d be more impressed by ASCII animation. If you’ve seen that one a few too many times, have a look at the video below for a more original take.

Impressive, although if you use VLC’s ASCII output codec to get a similar effect. Remember the Hackaday video about the KIM UNO clock? See below (to right)  to see how VLC converted it into some ASCII art.

asciicad kimascii

How Far Back Does This Go?

Sure, Teletypes and paper tape and green fan-fold paper is all old stuff, right? You might think this type of art can’t go back beyond computer printing. You might think that, but you’d be wrong. Look at the ad  below from the New York Times in 1881.

Although the ad uses a character (“B”) to stand in for proper graphics. However, some of the characters aren’t whole, so it isn’t quite the same as computer art. However, it does show that people had the idea of using characters as graphic elements way before mechanical printers came on the scene.
oldfurn

Is there a practical use for this? Who knows when you’ll have a text-only LCD or printer and want to spice it up a bit? Or maybe you just want a retro look to a project. Even if those things never happen, ASCII art can be a lot of fun to look at and create.

We’ve covered the more colorful ANSI art in the past. If you want something with a little more hardware, you might find this typewriter amazing.


Filed under: Retrotechtacular

Instructables: exploring - featured: The Pink Brocade Snare Drum

A Pink Brocade Snare Drum ... who doesn't want one? Although I don't do it often, I have the ability and rather enjoy making drums. Pink isn't in my top ten of colors, but once I saw the brocade drum my friend Bill made ... I wanted to make one. I'd never wrapped a drum in fabric, but what's the w...
By: -BALES-

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Planet Haskell: Functional Jobs: Senior Software Engineer (Haskell) at Front Row Education (Full-time)

Position

Senior Functional Web Engineer to join fast-growing education startup transforming the way 3+ million K-8 students learn Math and English.

What you will be doing

Architect, design and develop new applications, tools and distributed systems for the Front Row ecosystem in Haskell, Flow, PostgreSQL, Ansible and many others. You will get to work on your deliverable end-to-end, from the UX to the deployment logic.

Mentor and support more junior developers in the organization

Create, improve and refine workflows and processes for delivering quality software on time and without incurring debt

Work as part of a very small (there's literally half a dozen of us!), world-class team of engineers with a track record of rapidly delivering valuable software to millions of users.

Work closely with Front Row educators, product managers, customer support representatives and account executives to help the business move fast and efficiently through relentless automation.

Why you should join Front Row

Our mission is important to us, and we want it to be important to you as well: millions of students learn math using Front Row every month. Our early results show students improve twice as much while using Front Row than their peers who aren’t using the program.

As an experienced engineer, you will have a massive impact on the company, product, and culture; you’ll have a ton of autonomy and responsibility; you’ll have equity to match the weight of this role. If you're looking for an opportunity to both grow and do meaningful work, surrounded and supported by like-minded professionals, this is THE place for you.

You will be working side by side with well known world-class personalities in the Haskell and Functional Programming community whose work you've likely used. Front Row is an active participant to the Open Source community and contributor to some of the most popular Haskell libraries.

A lot of flexibility: while we all work towards the same goals, you’ll have a lot of autonomy in what you work on. You can work from home up to one day a week, and we have a very flexible untracked vacation days policy

The company and its revenue are growing at a rocketship pace. Front Row is projected to make a massive impact on the world of education in the next few years. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity to join a small organization with great odds of becoming the Next Big Thing.

Must haves

  • You have experience doing full-stack web development. You understand HTTP, networking, databases and the world of distributed systems.
  • You have functional programming experience.
  • Extreme hustle: you’ll be solving a lot of problems you haven’t faced before without the resources and the support of a giant organization. You must thrive on getting things done, whatever the cost.
  • Soft skills: we want you to move into a leadership position, so you must be an expert communicator

Nice-to-haves

  • You have led a software development team before
  • You have familiarity with a functional stack (Haskell / Clojure / Scala / OCaml etc)
  • You understand and have worked all around the stack before, from infrastructure automation all the way to the frontend
  • You're comfortable with the Behavior-Driven Development style
  • You have worked at a very small startup before: you thrive on having a lot of responsibility and little oversight
  • You have worked in small and effective Agile/XP teams before
  • You have delivered working software to large numbers of users before

Benefits

  • Competitive salary
  • Generous equity option grants
  • Medical, Dental, and Vision
  • Catered lunch and dinner 4 times a week
  • Equipment budget
  • (onsite only) One flexible work day per week
  • (onsite only) Working from downtown SF, very accessible location
  • Professional yet casual work environment

Get information on how to apply for this position.

OCaml Planet: Functional Jobs: Senior Software Engineer (Haskell) at Front Row Education (Full-time)

Position

Senior Functional Web Engineer to join fast-growing education startup transforming the way 3+ million K-8 students learn Math and English.

What you will be doing

Architect, design and develop new applications, tools and distributed systems for the Front Row ecosystem in Haskell, Flow, PostgreSQL, Ansible and many others. You will get to work on your deliverable end-to-end, from the UX to the deployment logic.

Mentor and support more junior developers in the organization

Create, improve and refine workflows and processes for delivering quality software on time and without incurring debt

Work as part of a very small (there's literally half a dozen of us!), world-class team of engineers with a track record of rapidly delivering valuable software to millions of users.

Work closely with Front Row educators, product managers, customer support representatives and account executives to help the business move fast and efficiently through relentless automation.

Why you should join Front Row

Our mission is important to us, and we want it to be important to you as well: millions of students learn math using Front Row every month. Our early results show students improve twice as much while using Front Row than their peers who aren’t using the program.

As an experienced engineer, you will have a massive impact on the company, product, and culture; you’ll have a ton of autonomy and responsibility; you’ll have equity to match the weight of this role. If you're looking for an opportunity to both grow and do meaningful work, surrounded and supported by like-minded professionals, this is THE place for you.

You will be working side by side with well known world-class personalities in the Haskell and Functional Programming community whose work you've likely used. Front Row is an active participant to the Open Source community and contributor to some of the most popular Haskell libraries.

A lot of flexibility: while we all work towards the same goals, you’ll have a lot of autonomy in what you work on. You can work from home up to one day a week, and we have a very flexible untracked vacation days policy

The company and its revenue are growing at a rocketship pace. Front Row is projected to make a massive impact on the world of education in the next few years. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity to join a small organization with great odds of becoming the Next Big Thing.

Must haves

  • You have experience doing full-stack web development. You understand HTTP, networking, databases and the world of distributed systems.
  • You have functional programming experience.
  • Extreme hustle: you’ll be solving a lot of problems you haven’t faced before without the resources and the support of a giant organization. You must thrive on getting things done, whatever the cost.
  • Soft skills: we want you to move into a leadership position, so you must be an expert communicator

Nice-to-haves

  • You have led a software development team before
  • You have familiarity with a functional stack (Haskell / Clojure / Scala / OCaml etc)
  • You understand and have worked all around the stack before, from infrastructure automation all the way to the frontend
  • You're comfortable with the Behavior-Driven Development style
  • You have worked at a very small startup before: you thrive on having a lot of responsibility and little oversight
  • You have worked in small and effective Agile/XP teams before
  • You have delivered working software to large numbers of users before

Benefits

  • Competitive salary
  • Generous equity option grants
  • Medical, Dental, and Vision
  • Catered lunch and dinner 4 times a week
  • Equipment budget
  • (onsite only) One flexible work day per week
  • (onsite only) Working from downtown SF, very accessible location
  • Professional yet casual work environment

Get information on how to apply for this position.

Computer Science: Theory and Application: Web scraping library for Java that handles JavaScript well?

I'm writing a web scraper in Java and need to get ALL the links on a page. I've tried HtmlUnit but it's not good at handling content dynamically added by Javascript. I'm using Selenium now, which is technically able to click links in something like Angular, but I need to actually get the links themselves and store them.

For example, for the following code on a website:

<li><span ng-click="changeRoute('home')">Home</span></li>

it's a button that takes the user to the home page. I would like to get the actual URL for that link, but it runs a JavaScript function.

Anyone know of a way to run the JavaScript code to generate the link? I looked in the JavaScript source and the URL is not specifically stated so it would be hard to do a Regex for the URL.

Any other libraries or tips would be appreciated. Thanks!

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programming: The Languages Which Almost Became CSS

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BOOOOOOOM!: Surreal Self-Portraits by Japanese Photographer Izumi Miyazaki

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Japanese photographer Izumi Miyazaki transforms mundane objects and situations into delightfully surreal self-portraits. See more images below or on display at Wild Project Gallery in Luxembourg from June 30th to July 30th.

programming: Rust: Systems Programming for Everyone

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CreativeApplications.Net: 50 Animations populate SFPC’s re-coded at Day for Night

sfpc_re-code_00In December 2015, SFPC were invited to participate at Day for Night festival in Houston, TX. SFPC co-founder Zach Lieberman, students from the fall 2015 session, and the larger SFPC community worked together to create ‘SFPC re-coded’, a project that presented over 50 animations from more than 30 different contributors.

Hackaday: E Pluribus Unix, QR-Style

It’s been a long time since we’ve logged into a UNIX mainframe (other than our laptop) but one of our fond memories is the daily fortune: small, quirky, sometimes cryptic sayings that would pop up on the login screen if your system administrator had any sense of humor.

Apparently, we’re not alone. [Alastair] made his own fortune clock which gives you a new “fortune” every second instead of every login. There’s a catch, of course. It’s a QR clock — the fortune is encoded in a QR code instead of being displayed in human-readable form. You have to take a picture of the tiny OLED screen to know what it says. (Watch it sending him Shakespeare sonnets in the video below.)

You probably know QR codes are good for conveying URLs, but their use as general-purpose text containers is underappreciated in our book, so we’re glad to see this example. Now, we’ve seen QR clocks before (here, and here), and this version does have the disadvantage that you can actually tell what time it is. But we’re grateful for the trip down memory lane.


Filed under: clock hacks

Open Culture: Hear Anaïs Nin Read From Her Celebrated Diary: A 60-Minute Vintage Recording (1966)

At one time, writer Anaïs Nin’s reputation largely rested on her passionate, long-term love affair with novelist Henry Miller, whom she also financially supported while he wrote his best-known novels and became, writes Sady Doyle, a “darling of the avant-garde.” Nin herself was a marginalized, “unfashionable” writer, whose “frank portrayals of illegal abortions, extramarital affairs and incest” brought such critical opprobrium down on her that “by 1954, Nin believed the entire publishing industry saw her as a joke.” She had good reason to think so.

Miller’s notoriously censored books won him cult literary status, and inspired the Beats, Norman Mailer, Philip Roth, and many more hedonistic male writers seeking to turn their lives into art. Nin’s equally explicit work was met, she lamented, “with indifference, with insults.” Critics either ignored her novels, several of them self-published, or dismissed them as vulgar, artless, and worse. One headline, Doyle notes, called Nin “a monster of self-centeredness whose artistic pretentions now seem grotesque.”

All of that changed when Nin published the first volume of her diary in 1966. Thereafter, she achieved global fame as a feminist icon, and the next ten years saw the publication of an additional six volumes of her journals, then several more excerpts after her death in 1977. Most notably, Henry and June appeared in 1986 (subsequently made into a film by Philip Kaufman), a book which—in conjunction with the publication of her and Miller’s letters the following year—further added to the mythology of the two passionately erotic writers.

Nin had kept her diaries religiously since age 11, and has become known as “modernity’s most prolific and perceptive diarist,” writes Maria Popova, a distinction that has led to a tremendous resurgence in pop culture popularity in our time, when well-crafted self-revelation is de rigeur for artists, activists, online personalities, and aspirants of all kinds. Henry Miller is now “a marginalized and largely forgotten American writer” (or so claims his biographer Arthur Hoyle), and Nin has become a “patron saint of social media,” writes Doyle, a “proto-Lena-Dunham.” Pithy quotations from her diaries—properly credited or not—constantly circulate on Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter.

A new generation just discovering Anaïs Nin can access her work in any number of ways—from hip, meme-heavy Tumblr accounts like Fuck Yeah Anais Nin to more formal online venues like the Anais Nin Blog, which aggregates biographies, podcasts, scholarship, bibliographies, controversies, and anything else one might want to know about the author. Anaïs Nin fans can also hear the author herself read from her famous diary in the audio here. At the top of the post, hear Nin’s reading, recorded in ’66, the year of the first volume’s publication. The complete recording runs about 60 minutes. (For some reason, the person who uploaded the audio to Youtube left some blank space at the end.) You can hear an alternative version on Archive.org.

After the acclaim of Nin’s diaries, and the celebrity she enjoyed in her last decade, her reputation once again suffered, posthumously, as biographers and critics savaged her life and work in moralistic torrents of what would today be called “slut-shaming.” But Nin is now once again rightly revered as a writer fully dedicated to the art, no matter the reception or the audience. The astonishing stream of words that flowed from her, recording every detail of her experiences, “seems nothing less than phenomenal,” wrote Noel Young of Nin’s nonstop letter writing. When it came to the detailed, insightful, and acutely philosophical recording of her life, “the act of writing may have even surpassed the act of living.”

Related Content:

Simone de Beauvoir Explains “Why I’m a Feminist” in a Rare TV Interview (1975)

Henry Miller Makes a List of “The 100 Books That Influenced Me Most”

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

Hear Anaïs Nin Read From Her Celebrated Diary: A 60-Minute Vintage Recording (1966) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

programming: MS16-039 – “Windows 10” 64 bits Integer Overflow exploitation by using GDI objects

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OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS: While discussing superhero movies... (From the OVC Archive!)

Check out The Complete OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS on Kickstarter!

Quiet Earth: First Look at Criterion's PAN'S LABYRINTH Blu-ray

Criterion Collection will release a new, 10th Anniversary edition of Guillermo del Toro's academy award winning horror/fantasy Pan's Labyrinth this fall.


The director shared the cover art on Twitter.


Since the title has not been announced by the company officially, there is no information on their website about special features or transfer work. Though, if their previous releases of Cronos and The Devil's Backbone are anything to go by, the release will be stellar.

[Continued ...]

SMBC: SMBC - I'm quirky!



New comic!

Today's News:

things magazine: Future thoughts

A couple of tmn things: Brief Interviews with Very Small Publishers, and an old and hence even more magically wrong article about the urban futures of London, Los Angeles and Moscow / underneath that CGI card is a Blackbird / … Continue reading

All Content: A Beautiful Movie About Farting: The Daniels on “Swiss Army Man”

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Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, the directing duo that goes by the name “The Daniels,” nabbed some of the most divisive headlines out of the 2016 Sundance Film Festival after the premiere of their comedy “Swiss Army Man,” which just opened in limited release this past weekend and goes wide on Friday, July 1st. Stories of walk-outs were overblown and somewhat overshadowed the truth about the response from most critics and fest goers, who loved this quirky, strange, bizarre fairy tale of a film. Paul Dano stars as Hank, a man about to kill himself on a deserted island when the body of a man named Manny (Daniel Radcliffe) washes ashore. Hank and Manny, well, they become friends, especially after the corpse not only starts talking to Hank but becomes a multi-purpose tool to get him to safety. The two playful, brilliant writer/directors sat down with us in Chicago this week to discuss their film, their leads, how people have been responding to it, and how essential music was to the final product.

There’s been a lot of discussion of unusual screenings and Q&As for “Swiss Army Man.” What’s an unexpected response or question that threw you that you found memorable?

DANIEL SCHEINERT: The most unexpected responses are talking to people afterwards. The one-on-one ones.

DAN KWAN: The one Q&A at Sundance, one of the last screenings—the first question off the bat was “Do you believe in God?” Perfect question.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: It was very long-winded, circling around big theme s…

DAN KWAN: … "I guess what I’m saying is ‘Do you believe in God?’"

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Fun question.

DAN KWAN: The unexpected ones are the ones that are very thoughtful because most of the time it’s “How did you come up with all the body powers?”

DANIEL SCHEINERT: The emotional ones. People will come up afterwards and be smiling, and talking about how much they like it, and, as they’re talking, start tearing up.

DAN KWAN: Specifically, as they’re talking. They’ll start tearing up. It’s bizarre.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: That’s what happened to me with Sia the other night. She saw it in LA.

DAN KWAN: She’s worked with Paul.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: She left right as the credits rolled because I think she didn’t want to get mobbed and we were waiting out in the lobby and she was heading out and saw me and Paul Dano, and she was like, “Hi! Guys! It was good! It was SO GOOD!” And she started fist-pumping and tearing up. And giving us hugs. This is the best way to meet one of your favorite musicians. What a fucking dream come true.

What do you think people are getting emotional about? I don’t want to put words or thoughts in people’s minds but are these lonely, shy people going with the idea of self-expression or bonds of friendship?

DAN KWAN: It’s a whole bunch of things. It depends on the person.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Yeah, there’s a lot of folks who feel like the movie touches on and validates their loneliness.

DAN KWAN: Their strangeness. Whatever that may be. A lot of the people who come up to us afterwards are clearly different for some reason and it’s great to see them feel like this movie, hopefully, feels like a big hug to them.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: I think the movie is about sharing those feelings with someone. It’s in some ways an invitation to …

DAN KWAN: … expose themselves to us.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Yeah. The power to share. It’s real fun. It’s getting a compliment to get a story from a stranger.

DAN KWAN: One of the stories that we’ve been telling a lot lately—this is a little different than someone who felt acceptance from the movie—there was this lady who came up to us after the second screening at Sundance, and she ran up on stage after the Q&A and she was like, “I know I’m not supposed to be up here, but I need to tell you that I have a friend who can fart in front of me and it’s really great, and then I have another best friend who can’t fart in front of me and I just feel like if he could fart in front me he’d be so much happier.” And then she started crying. Paul went to hug her, and we were all like, “What just happened?!?” But she found a strange metaphor in our movie to be able to pin down why her friend was so unhappy. I guess it broke her heart. That’s a whole other reason to be so emotionally affected by this film. In some strange way, our story is touching people. And I think the longer that people have time to process it, more people will realize that there’s a strange power in these two characters.

And you talk about strangeness and acceptance and being different—did you approach the film stylistically with that theme in mind? Being different? If we’re going to make a film about being different, we have to make a film that feels different, tonally and structurally?

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Not really. The beginning of the process was kind of like an epic cliff jump. We got excited about the premise of the movie being crazy. “That sounds like a challenge. Let’s make that movie.” Let’s jump off the cliff, and on the way down we spent all of our time trying to make it conventional. Not conventional, but relatable. Our worst fear was that this crazy premise would just be a niche film that’s crazy. If anything, we spent most of our time trying to make this unpalatable content palatable.

DAN KWAN: That being said, you’re talking about tone and execution—that stuff just kind of naturally came out of the story itself. Whenever we started to put our film into a genre box, it would break down that wall itself. It would feel wrong. “Why isn’t this working? Oh, because this movie doesn’t want to be stuck in this genre. It needs to be two or three things at once. It needs to be gray.” The example that was strongest for us, because it was a really big turning point, was the relationship between Hank and Manny. For a very long time, we wouldn’t allow them to fall in love, even though as we were writing it, in the back of our heads, “It was like I think they’re gonna … no, that’s not right. Our movie is weird enough as it is. They’re just best friends. This is a buddy comedy. This is about two strangers really connecting.” Second-to-last draft, close to the end, we decided these two need each other. We can’t label it as anything. It’s not that they’re gay or “straight guys who decided to be gay.” It’s just two people who needed each other. That’s really cool. There’s no label for it, and there’s no clean way to draw lines. That kind of bled into everything we did. Everything needed to be a little gray so people could find new ways to redefine it for themselves.

It’s a movie that doesn’t need rational explanation. It doesn’t work if you try to explain too much of it. How early in the process was music such an essential part of it? When I ask about structure being different, that’s one of the things I think about it—characters sing along and the music comments on the action. How early in the process was that part of the project?

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Very early. I think before we even wrote the first draft. The first draft had even more meta-filmmaking stuff. He narrated.

DAN KWAN: He would narrate himself.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: He was like overtly puppeteering Manny. From the get-go, we knew that what excited us was that Hank would kind of see his life as a movie. I don’t think we’re unique because we’re filmmakers. We all watch TV and movies and imagine ourselves in our own movies.

Especially nowadays.

DAN KWAN: Oh, for sure. The whole generation has kind of created that.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: So, when being stranded in the woods got exciting to us—we’re not survival film fanatics—sticking a human being from today in the woods and having them get songs stuck in their head and score their life and use music to get peace of mind to hike for four hours. That will be interesting. Now I’m excited to shoot a survival film.

And then how do you find the music? How does Manchester Orchestra get involved?

DAN KWAN: They were much later. Music is really important to our process because we come from music videos. And so we had been collecting a massive playlist of references for like three or four years. As we were writing, we kept adding to it, so it was like ten hours long. Music that we knew would be interesting to combine and create what we were going for. So, even as we were writing, we listen to music for references. We didn’t know who to go out to. If we went to a traditional composer, I don’t know if they would understand what we were going for. A lot of this stuff is very beautiful but also messy, and also kind of stupid sometimes. The lyrics are so overtly dumb, in a very simple, beautiful way.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Eventually, we decided we’d do it in two parts—hire someone to write songs and hire someone to compose the music. The composer will use their songs as inspiration. So, we reached out to Andy Hull because we loved, specifically, his solo stuff, or the more muted Manchester Orchestra stuff. Those melodies would get stuck in my head and he’s got such a beautiful voice and he understands melodies. So, all we asked him to do was like send us some melodies. We couldn’t even offer him money. “We don’t have financing, but would you be interested in spitballing with us?” And we sent him the script and he loved it. He sent us a recorded, mixed song the next day, which is the credits song.

DAN KWAN: That’s the exact recording too. That’s exactly what he wrote. That melody ended up becoming Hank’s main theme.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: He was like, “I just had a baby and I don’t want to go on tour right now. I love movies. Please let me do this.” And he brought in Rob, who produces the Manchester records, and they kind of aggressively were prolific and passionate.

DAN KWAN: “Don’t let anyone else compose. We’ll be the ones.”

DANIEL SCHEINERT: They became the whole deal. It’s their fault more than ours.

DAN KWAN: The funny thing about this movie is that it really does live or die on music. I think for most films that’s not a good thing, but I think tonally what we’re doing is so specific that we knew to overcome the preconceived ideas of what this movie would be conceptually, we had to slam in with a lot of emotion and force the tone. Allow that cognitive dissonance to play in people’s minds. If you watch any of these scenes without music, it’s horrific.

Or like a James Newton Howard score. It would be a totally different film. 

DAN KWAN: For sure!

DANIEL SCHEINERT: I kind of want to put a feature on the Blu-ray where you can turn off the music. It’s a crazy person’s movie.

DAN KWAN: It’s nihilistic and mean.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Yep. It’s a guy looking at farts.

The playfulness you speak about lyrically and musically—calling lyrics dumb—tells us that that film is playful. This is messy. Like I said, put a John Williams score on this and it would be a disaster. So, there’s serendipity in him accepting your invitation. There’s also a little bit of that in the casting. How do you find the two guys?

DANIEL SCHEINERT: We loved their work, and we had heard they weren’t assholes. I don’t think we’re the kind of directors who could have a good, combative relationship with an actor the way some directors can. I feel like we did just kind of luck into it, but also we went in with a soft touch. We allowed the characters to evolve based on these guys.

DAN KWAN: The moment they got cast, we started rewriting for them. They’re such specific human beings. What we had written was so strange and bizarre, but we knew we wanted to be grounded. We just started to allow the characters to become more like the actual actors. Dan Radcliffe is the sweetest, most curious man we’ve ever met. When we saw that in real life, we were like, “Oh my God, if Manny had a little bit more of that it would be magic.”

DANIEL SCHEINERT: It would give the movie a heart. You’d care more about this corpse if we play to that strong suit of Daniel’s. We actually kind of like tricked Gap into letting us cast Paul Dano in this commercial campaign we’re doing. “You know who would be great for this thing?” So, we got to work with him before we shot the movie, but we had already cast him, and it was great. We got to know him, and see what his sense of humor was like, and kind of his dry simplicity. He’s a very funny guy. He’s at his funniest when he’s deadpan. So, we were like, “Hank should be more grounded, honest, and then the jokes should sneak up on you with Hank.” So we pulled back some of the broad …

So, really collaborative.

DAN KWAN: Oh, for sure.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Him especially. He read every draft. He insisted on Skyping for hours after each draft. His preparation as an actor was to understand our story inside and out. Talk it out.

How do you two work together? Does one have different duties, different strengths than the other?

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Yeah. There are certain patterns that evolve but there’s never been like …

Assignments.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Yeah.

DAN KWAN: The longer we work together, the more we kind of learn from each other. When we first started, we were very different. We have very different processes, even now. He comes from improv and comedy; I come from animation and design. We’re completely opposite ends of the spectrum, but we happen to have similar senses of humor. Somehow it works. Every step of the way—we’re different writers, different in pre-production, we take turns getting stressed out about different things.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Dan is willing to doubt our movie. When it needs improving, he’ll hole up and be like “It’s not good enough.” That scares me, but I love solving problems. When politics are getting messy or people are miscommunicating or a location falls through, I love diving in and being like, “There’s a tactful way to approach this and we’re gonna solve it quickly.” That happens ten times a day during a movie.

DAN KWAN: I get stressed out a lot during writing. He gets stressed out a lot during pre-production. And then we’re both stressed out during shooting.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: But in different ways.

DAN KWAN: And then editing, we take turns. Every day depends on your mood. One day, “This scene’s working!” The next day, “What the hell is this??!?!? Let’s cut the whole scene.”

DANIEL SCHEINERT: The other answer to your question is that whatever one of us doesn’t want to do on a certain day, we’ll let the other one do it. Or whoever is most passionate about whatever, and that will change from day to day.

Not unlike a marriage.

DANIEL SCHEINERT: Right. It really is.

DAN KWAN: Tag team when you need each other.

What’s next?

DAN KWAN: We’re writing another feature soon. It’s going to hopefully be with some of the same producers and financiers. If they were crazy enough to do this movie with us … let’s do another one. It’s going to be similar tone, but not nearly as crazy. It’s really fun to make crazy movies when people are telling you no. Not as much when people tell you can.

You need a little of that resistance to be creative.

DAN KWAN: Exactly. It’s gonna be a sci-fi/action movie, but also incredibly stupid.


All Content: The Political Idealism of Gary Ross

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Who is America’s most successful political filmmaker? While most would argue divisive names like Spike Lee or Michael Moore, I’m going to nominate Gary Ross. You know his films: “Big,” “Dave,” “Pleasantville,” “Seabiscuit,” “The Hunger Games” and now “Free State of Jones,” which opened last Friday. His work routinely captures the zeitgeist, but with no indie credibility or claim to auteurship, he rarely gets the credit, and his themes and motifs don’t get discussed. This should change. A close reading of his career reveals an acuity at telling political stories that attract broad, bipartisan audiences in an increasingly polarized era. He may also be the most idealistic filmmaker working today.

Idealism is not to be confused with political purism. Purists are everywhere these days. From social media to the op-ed pages, they have to come to dominate political discourse on both sides of the aisle. Purists reject nuance in their politics. They view political compromise as counterproductive and steadfastly refuse to seek common ground on those who disagree with them. Purists are divisive; idealists seek to unite us behind something positive.

Ross is an idealist but not a purist. Before he got into directing, he was a hugely successful screenwriter, penning such feel-good hits as “Big” and “Dave.” Both films have a common thread; they are about the “redemptive power of innocence,” as Ross has put it. They depict idealistic characters who enter cynical institutions—corporate America and the White House—and return them to their more innocent roots through honesty, enthusiasm and an utter lack of guile.

“Big” and “Dave” were crowd-pleasers, and (or perhaps because) the politics that lurked underneath their crowd-pleasing stories were simple. Josh Baskin, played by Tom Hanks in “Big,” was a yuppie analogue, a grown man-child thrust into a position of economic power. While his youthful vigor may have brightened the mood of his glum co-workers, the film is still a relatively shallow probe into the corporate culture that so defined the Reagan era. The politics of “Dave” are equally superficial; the administration taken over by Dave Kovacs (Kevin Kline), a presidential look-a-like asked to secretly step in when the real president falls ill, looks, at first, a lot like a liberal fantasy. Kovacs reshapes the presidency as an apparatus of the working class, but he does so only through his everyman charisma; the film’s dismissal of the actual work of governing and consensus-building makes its ideal ruler seem more like an authoritarian strongman than the leader of a democracy.

When Ross finally got into the director’s chair, he started to atone for this simplicity. His political perspective became richer and more nuanced. No longer was he content to simply hold up idealism as a virtue. He began to explore idealism from many angles, examining how the concept is used and packaged in order to satiate the masses.

In his directorial debut, “Pleasantville,” David (played with literal wide-eyed optimism by Tobey Maguire) is an idealist in a cynical world. He doesn’t quite fit in at high school and is overwhelmed by complicated contemporary issues like global warming, so he finds comfort in the TV Land-style pleasures of the story’s eponymous TV show, a 1950s domestic comedy in which things are simple and true and right. When a magical remote control transports him and his bad-girl sister Jennifer (Reese Witherspoon) to the TV world of Pleasantville, David is initially thrilled to be living in such a wholesome place.

But over the course of the film, Ross lifts the veil on Pleasantville and finds that social order comes at a social cost. His TV mother Betty (Joan Allen) has a sexual awakening that serves as a symbol of the second-wave of feminism. As David and his classmates start to come to life, they turn "colored"; town authorities, threatened by their otherness, start to crack down with a series of laws that resemble Jim Crow. Ross has been clear about his political intent. After a decade or so of hearing politicians like Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bob Dole (“I want to build a bridge to the past”) clamor about a return to the prosperity of the 1950s, buttressed by a film industry that seemed set on supporting that fantasy (films like “Back to the Future,” “Diner,” “Stand By Me” and “Peggy Sue Got Married” made Hollywood seem like a ‘50s nostalgia factory), Ross felt compelled to remind audiences of the real social dynamics at play during this so-called better era, in which conformity quashed individuality—and prejudice and fear consumed our democracy. The 1950s were a simpler time, he points out, as long as you were white and male.

David is still idealistic at the end of “Pleasantville,” but it’s an earned idealism, and such characters populate Ross’ next three films. “Seabiscuit” was an unabashed love letter to American resilience at a time when the country needed it most. The film, which was nominated for seven Oscars including Best Picture, came along less than two years after 9/11, and its Depression-era tale of damaged Americans—including a disabled jockey, a failed businessman and the injured horse itself—resonated with a nation recovering from its own national trauma. It’s not one of Ross’ most nuanced works; “Seabiscuit” lacks a self-critical apparatus to elevate it beyond its propagandistic tendencies, but much like George W. Bush in the days after 9/11, it was the film we needed at the time.

But even through its rose-tinted nationalism, "Seabiscuit" celebrates a strain of idealism borne out of hardship and loss. The horse’s owner, played by Jeff Bridges, is the best model of this thinking. Riffing on his role in 1988’s “Tucker: The Man and His Dream,” Bridges plays the happy-go-lucky bicycle repairman who gets rich when he starts selling automobiles (he describes them as “the future”). But his life comes crashing down with the market; he loses everything, including his wife, who leaves him after the money goes away. The positivity with which he shepherds Seabiscuit—and, the film argues, an adoring nation—to success is inborn, but it’s also a product of his loss. He refuses to let Seabiscuit retire or be euthanized after an injury because he just can’t stand to see another defeat.

Nine years later, Ross returned with his most successful film yet, the mega-blockbuster adaptation of “The Hunger Games.” Although he was hardly a household name, it’s easy to see why producers trusted Ross with the first installment of what they hoped would be a franchise that would make lots of people rich. Ross had demonstrated an ability to turn political material into a mainstream hit, and “The Hunger Games” would be one of the most political blockbusters ever made. Its dystopian story of class revolt tapped into the spirit of both Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party, and while pundits from both sides tried to claim the film’s politics as their own, its enormous commercial success clearly showed that it transcended party lines.

Again, idealism is the subject at hand. Katniss Everdeen is a most reluctant hero, who becomes an unwitting symbol of an uprising. People follow her, but she’s not sure she deserves it. The subsequent films in the franchise directed by Francis Lawrence delve more deeply into the way symbols are used and abused by those in power, but Ross deftly set the stage by defining the oppressing world of the Capitol in broad but efficient strokes and refusing to cave in to the film’s more sensationalistic elements. In explaining his refusal to rely too heavily on special effects and (particularly) 3D, Ross said that to do so would be “exploiting what the book condemns: a media-centric society where entertainment in that culture devolves into spectacle, and that spectacle evolves into political control.”

Ross’s latest, “Free State of Jones,” is by most accounts his first significant misstep. It’s one of those labors of love that a director works on for a decade and, after a big hit, gets the capital to make a reality. It’s a film that, if the weekend grosses are any indication, someone probably should have stopped. In addition to its general narrative failures, its racial and gender politics are woefully outdated, relying on a politically incorrect “white savior” archetype and relegating its women—without any agency of their own—to the jobs of wife and mother.

And yet it touches our political moment in eerily specific ways for a story that was ten years in the making. Its tale of a deserter from the Confederate Army who starts his own army, and eventually “free state,” may have been pitched as a racial story, but what drives Newton Knight (Matthew McConaughey) and his merry band of outsiders together is economics. Many poor white Southerners join his cause because of unfair taxation laws, income inequality and disillusionment over the war; when white savior Knight tells an escaped slave that he left the Confederacy because he didn’t want to die over cotton, the slave laughs and replies, “Me, too.”

Knight starts off as a cynic; as he helps his followers shed their racial divisions in pursuit of an economic utopia, he becomes an idealist. In this way, “Free State of Jones” captures our anti-establishment moment in which the old rules no longer apply. In 2016, voters on both the right and left are threatening to refuse their party’s nominee. Some Republicans are even planning to vote for Hillary, their once-hated rival, while disillusioned Sanders supporters are looking into the Libertarian Party and Gary Johnson. This is the brand-new world that “Free State of Jones” reflects, and it demonstrates once again the virtues of that director who can speak the language of politics to a truly bipartisan audience. Ross has his finger on the pulse of our democracy, and even if the box-offices grosses are not always kind, perhaps history will be.

Michael Geist: Canadian File Sharing Lawsuit Could Upend Copyright Privacy Protections

The centerpiece of Canada’s 2012 digital copyright reforms was the legal implementation of the “notice-and-notice” system that seeks to balance the interests of copyright holders, the privacy rights of Internet users, and the legal obligations of Internet service providers (ISPs). The law makes it easy for copyright owners to send infringement notices to ISPs, who are legally required to forward the notifications to their subscribers. The personal information of subscribers is not disclosed to the copyright owner.

Despite the promise of the notice-and-notice system, it has been misused virtually from the moment it took effect with copyright owners exploiting a loophole in the law by sending settlement demands within the notices.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes that the government has tried to warn recipients that they need not settle – the Office of Consumer Affairs advises that there are no obligations on a subscriber that receives a notice and that getting a notice does not necessarily mean you will be sued – yet many subscribers panic when they receive notifications and promptly pay hundreds or thousands of dollars.

While the government has been slow to implement an easy fix for the problem in the form of regulations prohibiting the inclusion of settlement demands within the notices,  another issue looms on the legal horizon that could eviscerate the privacy protections associated with the system.

Earlier this year, Voltage Pictures, which previously engaged in a lengthy court battle to require Canadian ISPs to disclose the names of alleged file sharers, adopted a new legal strategy. While the company obtained an order to disclose names in the earlier case, it came with conditions and costs. Its latest approach involves filing a reverse class action lawsuit against an unknown number of alleged uploaders of five of its movies.

The Voltage filing seeks certification of the class, a declaration that each member of the class has infringed its copyright, an injunction stopping further infringement, damages, and costs of the legal proceedings. Voltage names as its representative respondent an unknown uploader – John Doe – who is linked to a Rogers IP address. It admits that it does not know the names or identifies of any members of its proposed class, but seeks to group anyone in Canada who infringed its copyright.

Class action experts were puzzled by the lawsuit, questioning whether a reverse class action (which features a single plaintiff and multiple defendants) could be used to target copyright infringement. Class actions typically involve multiple plaintiffs (often consumers) and one defendant.

The full implications of the strategy began to emerge in recent weeks as Voltage asked the court to order Rogers to disclose the identity of its John Doe. Rogers is contesting the request with a spokesperson stating that “we protect our customers’ privacy and we will not share their personal information without their permission, or a court order. We require those safeguards to deter improper or over-reaching requests for disclosure.” (Note that I am adviser to the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, which is intervening in the case.)

That is important because Voltage is using the notice-and-notice system to argue that it is entitled to subscriber information. It argues in court documents that the system is designed to allow copyright holders to “inexpensively identify and locate the infringers of copyright.” Yet the reality is that the government did not intend for the rules to make it easy to disclose the identity of alleged infringers with the ISPs prohibited from simply handing over such information.

Canadian courts have established rules that may compel ISPs to hand over subscriber information, but there are strict limitations in how the information can be used and restrictions on public disclosure. Voltage envisions using the personal information of a single random person as the lead name in a high profile class action lawsuit, a much more intrusive use of the information with far reaching implications for the affected individual.

If Voltage succeeds, one of the last remaining benefits of an already imperfect system will be lost and with it, further erosion of Internet privacy in Canada.

The post Canadian File Sharing Lawsuit Could Upend Copyright Privacy Protections appeared first on Michael Geist.

Michael Geist: How a File-Sharing Lawsuit Against Rogers Threatens Your Internet Privacy

Appeared in the Toronto Star on June 27, 2016 as How a File-Sharing Lawsuit Against Rogers Threatens Your Internet Privacy

The centerpiece of Canada’s 2012 digital copyright reforms was the legal implementation of the “notice-and-notice” system that seeks to balance the interests of copyright holders, the privacy rights of Internet users, and the legal obligations of Internet service providers (ISPs). The law makes it easy for copyright owners to send infringement notices to ISPs, who are legally required to forward the notifications to their subscribers. The personal information of subscribers is not disclosed to the copyright owner.

Despite the promise of the notice-and-notice system, it has been misused virtually from the moment it took effect with copyright owners exploiting a loophole in the law by sending settlement demands within the notices.

The government has tried to warn recipients that they need not settle – the Office of Consumer Affairs advises that there are no obligations on a subscriber that receives a notice and that getting a notice does not necessarily mean you will be sued – yet many subscribers panic when they receive notifications and promptly pay hundreds or thousands of dollars.

While the government has been slow to implement an easy fix for the problem in the form of regulations prohibiting the inclusion of settlement demands within the notices,  another issue looms on the legal horizon that could eviscerate the privacy protections associated with the system.

Earlier this year, Voltage Pictures, which previously engaged in a lengthy court battle to require Canadian ISPs to disclose the names of alleged file sharers, adopted a new legal strategy. While the company obtained an order to disclose names in the earlier case, it came with conditions and costs. Its latest approach involves filing a reverse class action lawsuit against an unknown number of alleged uploaders of five of its movies.

The Voltage filing seeks certification of the class, a declaration that each member of the class has infringed its copyright, an injunction stopping further infringement, damages, and costs of the legal proceedings. Voltage names as its representative respondent an unknown uploader – John Doe – who is linked to a Rogers IP address. It admits that it does not know the names or identifies of any members of its proposed class, but seeks to group anyone in Canada who infringed its copyright.

Class action experts were puzzled by the lawsuit, questioning whether a reverse class action (which features a single plaintiff and multiple defendants) could be used to target copyright infringement. Class actions typically involve multiple plaintiffs (often consumers) and one defendant.

The full implications of the strategy began to emerge in recent weeks as Voltage asked the court to order Rogers to disclose the identity of its John Doe. Rogers is contesting the request with a spokesperson stating that “we protect our customers’ privacy and we will not share their personal information without their permission, or a court order. We require those safeguards to deter improper or over-reaching requests for disclosure.” (Note that I am adviser to the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, which is intervening in the case.)

That is important because Voltage is using the notice-and-notice system to argue that it is entitled to subscriber information. It argues in court documents that the system is designed to allow copyright holders to “inexpensively identify and locate the infringers of copyright.” Yet the reality is that the government did not intend for the rules to make it easy to disclose the identity of alleged infringers with the ISPs prohibited from simply handing over such information.

Canadian courts have established rules that may compel ISPs to hand over subscriber information, but there are strict limitations in how the information can be used and restrictions on public disclosure. Voltage envisions using the personal information of a single random person as the lead name in a high profile class action lawsuit, a much more intrusive use of the information with far reaching implications for the affected individual.

If Voltage succeeds, one of the last remaining benefits of an already imperfect system will be lost and with it, further erosion of Internet privacy in Canada.

Michael Geist holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law. He can be reached at mgeist@uottawa.ca or online at www.michaelgeist.ca.

The post How a File-Sharing Lawsuit Against Rogers Threatens Your Internet Privacy appeared first on Michael Geist.

Colossal: An Antique Piano Cut in Half, Connected Only by a Wishbone

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We’ve long marveled at artist Maskull Lasserre's masterful ability to carve anatomical details into everyday objects. One of his recent sculptures, titled Improbable Worlds, is no exception. For this piece the Canadian artist split an old upright piano in two, slicing through every last component leaving only a single point of connection: a tiny wishbone carved from the wooden piano back. The visual tension created by the piece is astounding, let alone the head-scratching question of how he technically accomplished it, knowing that if the weight of the piano shifted just slightly the piece would snap in half.

You can see more of Lasserre’s recent artworks in his portfolio.

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OCaml Weekly News: OCaml Weekly News, 28 Jun 2016

  1. Pla v1.0 - pxx for making templates
  2. ppx_deriving 4.0, ppx_deriving_yojson 3.0, ppx_deriving_protobuf 2.5
  3. Other OCaml News

OCaml Planet: Caml Weekly News: OCaml Weekly News, 28 Jun 2016

  1. Pla v1.0 - pxx for making templates
  2. ppx_deriving 4.0, ppx_deriving_yojson 3.0, ppx_deriving_protobuf 2.5
  3. Other OCaml News

Open Culture: The Very First Film Adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a Thomas Edison Production (1910)

The story of humans creating monstrous beings in their image may have perennial relevance, even if it seems specific to our contemporary cultural moment. What, after all, is Oscar Isaac’s AI inventor in Ex Machina but a 21st century update of Victor Frankenstein? And what is Frankenstein’s monster but a Gothic recreation of the Golem, or any number of folkloric automatons in cultures far and wide? It’s an age-old archetypal story that seems to get an update every year.


People have imagined making artificial people, perhaps for as long as people have told stories. But each iteration of that story emerges from a historical matrix of particular technological, philosophical, and metaphysical anxieties. In the case of Ex Machina, we have not only a thinking, feeling humanoid, but one created out of mass data collection and designed to serve the prurient interests of a Nietzschean venture capitalist engineer. How very 2015, no?

In the original Frankenstein, a novel written by a woman, Mary Shelley, we have a very different kind of monster, born out of a Romantic convergence of interest in alchemy and the occult—the original domains of early modern scientists like Isaac Newton—and more modern, industrial scientific methods (hence the novel’s subtitle, The Modern Prometheus). Many critics have called the novel the first work of science fiction, and many, like Maurice Hindle in the introduction to the Penguin Classics edition, have described its main theme as “the aspiration of modern masculinist scientists to be technically creative divinities.”

And yet, writes Ruth Franklin at the New Republic—drawing convincingly on Shelley’s own traumatic experiences with birth, including her own—Frankenstein might “also be a story about pregnancy.” Intriguing as this possibility may be, most interpretations of the novel have seen it as “a fable of masculine reproduction, in which a man creates life asexually.” That tradition continues in the movies with the first film adaptation of Frankenstein, made by Edison studios just over 100 years after the novel’s 1818 publication.

The 1910 short silent film, which you can watch above, bills itself as “a liberal adaptation from Mrs. Shelley’s famous story,” and opens in its first scene with Victor Frankenstein leaving home for college. Two years later, the Faustian mad scientist discovers the mystery of life, uses the knowledge to make his “creature”—a surprisingly grotesque scene—and, appalled at the sight of it, rejects the thing in horror. The rest of the story proceeds along the usual lines, as the monster, in rags and fright wig, seeks recognition from his creator/parent and wreaks havoc when he does not receive it.

This first Frankenstein film, directed by J. Searle Dawley, arrived two years after Edison’s Bronx, New York studios began full and very lucrative operations, and, by this time, writes Rich Drees, motion pictures had begun to receive unwelcome attention from “moral crusaders and reform groups, who decried the new medium as being dangerous and encouraging of immorality.” Edison responded quickly, fearing “a serious threat to his bottom line,” and ordered that his films’ production quality and “moral tone” be improved.

Frankenstein, writes Drees, “was the perfect choice to kick off production under this new moral banner. It’s a story that deals with the extremes of the human condition, life and death, and the dangers of tampering in God’s realm.” Edison released the film with the following disclaimer:

To those familiar with Mrs. Shelly’s story it will be evident that we have carefully omitted anything which might be any possibility shock any portion of the audience. In making the film the Edison Co. has carefully tried to eliminate all actual repulsive situations and to concentrate its endeavors upon the mystic and psychological problems that are to be found in this weird tale. Wherever, therefore, the film differs from the original story it is purely with the idea of eliminating what would be repulsive to a moving picture audience. 

Five years after the Edison studio’s short, another silent adaptation, Life Without Soul, appeared. Made by the Ocean Film Corporation, this film is now lost to history, but it qualifies as the first feature-length adaptation at 70 minutes. A review of the film, writes the blog Frankensteinia, “reveals a story that hews fairly close to Mary Shelley’s novel,” making a “bold attempt at capturing the world-spanning sweep of the tale.”

Several dozen film adaptations in the ensuing years have tracked more or less closely to Shelley’s narrative—giving Frankenstein’s monster a bride and having Victor Frankenstein reanimate his dead lover with the mind of a wrongly-executed man. But none of these films, so far as I know, has drawn out the subtext of Frankenstein as a novel about pregnancy and childbirth. Such an adaptation remains to be made, perhaps by the first woman director to take on a Frankenstein film.

You can find Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in our collections of Free eBooks and Free Audio Books.

The film above will be added to our collection, 1,150 Free Movies Online: Great Classics, Indies, Noir, Westerns, etc..

Related Content:

The First Horror Film, George Méliès’ The Manor of the Devil (1896)

Frankenweenie: Tim Burton Turns Frankenstein Tale into Disney Kids Film (1984)

Mary Shelley’s Handwritten Manuscripts of Frankenstein Now Online for the First Time

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

The Very First Film Adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a Thomas Edison Production (1910) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

CreativeApplications.Net: Power of One #Surface – Compression and dilation of time

power_of_one_surface_06Created by Shohei Fujimoto, Power of One #Surface explores perception through reflection and position, where the visitor is invited to explore both the actual and reflected pattern which continuously changes according to the angle of reflective surfaces.

BOOOOOOOM!: Illustrator Spotlight: Jeff Ostberg

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Jeff Östberg is a Swedish illustrator currently living and working in Stockholm. More images below.

BOOOOOOOM!: Illustrator Spotlight: Anabel Colazo

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Loooove Anabel Colazo’s work! Valencia, Spain. More images below.

Electronics-Lab: RuuviTag – Open-Source Bluetooth Sensor Beacon

Open-source sensor beacon platform designed especially for makers, developers and IoT companies. Some of the features are:

  • Easy to use
  • IoT and Bluetooth 5 ready
  • Filled with sensors (it can work as a weather station!)
  • Affordable
  • Attractive design
  • and last but not least — 100% Open-Source.

A year ago we started a design process with one goal: to create a superior open-source sensor beacon platform to fulfill the needs of developersmakers, hobbyists, students and even IoT companies and normal people. We managed to create one of the most advanced Bluetooth sensor products in the world.

RuuviTag – Open-Source Bluetooth Sensor Beacon – [Link]

The post RuuviTag – Open-Source Bluetooth Sensor Beacon appeared first on Electronics-Lab.

BOOOOOOOM!: Illustrator Spotlight: Paul Paetzel

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A selection of work by Berlin-based illustrator Paul Paetzel. More images below.

Instructables: exploring - featured: How to Make Cheap Video Lighting [for Less Than $30]

Why do you need video lighting?The best camera will perform bad on bad light conditioning and the worst camera will perform well on good light conditions.As you can see on the image shooting in bad light condition cause:Noise (look at the left image)Weird Shadows (look under the chin on the left ima...
By: SiliconHowTo

Continue Reading »

Electronics-Lab: Dark Sensitive Switch – LED Light

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Dark activated LED light is a simple project which operates a LED when the light falling on the LDR goes below a set point.  The circuit is built using LM393 comparator, LDR as light sensor, preset (potentiometer) for sensitivity adjustment, transistor to drive the LED. The project can also be considered for use in energy saving application.

Features

  • Input – 12 V @ 1A
  • LED 12V 500mA Maximum (6W)
  • Onboard Preset for Level Adjust
  • Operation LED Indicator
  • On Board Power LED
  • Header Connector for Power Supply and LED
  • PCB dimensions 55.45MM X 12.70 MM

Dark Sensitive Switch – LED Light – [Link]

The post Dark Sensitive Switch – LED Light appeared first on Electronics-Lab.

Electronics-Lab: Magnetic Field Measurement Using HMC5883 and Arduino Nano

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In this tutorial we are going to learn the detailed working of HMC5883 with arduino nano.

The HMC5883is a digital compass designed for low-field magnetic sensing.This device has a wide magnetic field range of +/-8 Oe, and an output rate of 160 Hz. The HMC5883 sensor includes automatic degaussing strap drivers, offset cancellation, and a 12-bit ADC that enables 1° to 2° compass heading accuracy. All I²C Mini Modules are designed to operate at 5VDC.

Magnetic Field Measurement Using HMC5883 and Arduino Nano – [Link]

The post Magnetic Field Measurement Using HMC5883 and Arduino Nano appeared first on Electronics-Lab.

Open Culture: Colorful Animation Visualizes 200 Years of Immigration to the U.S. (1820-Present)

Many of us, whether born there, residing there, or just interested in the place, describe the United States of America as “a nation of immigrants.” What exactly that phrase means has in recent times become the subject of heated public debate. As this year’s presidential candidates strain to appeal to voters with a wide variety of views on the question of what role immigration should play in America’s future (to say nothing of what’s going on in Britain right now), it might help to look at what role immigration has played in its past, and a new animated infographic of who has immigrated from where since 1820 gives the clearest possible look at the whole picture.



“Through most of the 1800s, immigration came predominantly from Western Europe (Ireland, Germany, the U.K.),” writes the data visualization’s creator Max Galka at Metrocosm. “Toward the end of the century, countries further east in Europe (Italy, Russia, Hungary) took over as the largest source of migration. Beginning in the early 1900’s, most immigrants arrived from the Americas (Canada, Mexico). And the last few decades have seen a rise in migration from Asia.”

Each colored dot flying toward the U.S. represents a part of that country’s population, and the brightness of a country’s color on the map corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at that particular time. Galka provides other charts that show immigration flows by country of origin over time, which makes immigration look higher than ever, and then the same data as a percentage of the total population of the United States, which makes it look almost lower than ever. (And as an American who moved to Korea last year, I can’t help but ask whether we should now give as much thought to emigration out of the U.S. as we have to immigration into it.)

To really feel the advantages and complications of the nation of immigrants first-hand, you’ll want to spend time in a major American city, those always vibrant, often troubled places that people like The Wire creator David Simon have dedicated themselves to observing. “You look at what New Orleans is capable of, as a product of the American melting pot, and it’s glorious,” he once said. “It’s in the friction and in the dynamic between the various groups that inhabit a city that creativity really happens. What makes cities work is a level of tolerance and human endeavor and wit that is absolutely required on the part of all people. Whether or not we succeed as an urban people is the only question worth asking.” And in America, an urban people has always been a diverse people.

via Mental Floss

Related Content:

Rare Audio: Albert Einstein Explains “Why I Am an American” on Day He Passes Citizenship Test (1940)

Noam Chomsky on Whether the Rise of Trump Resembles the Rise of Fascism in 1930s Germany

Brexit 101: The UK’s Stunning Vote Explained in 4 Minutes

The Syrian Conflict & The European Refugee Crisis Explained in an Animated Primer

John Green’s Crash Course in U.S. History: From Colonialism to Obama in 47 Videos

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

Colorful Animation Visualizes 200 Years of Immigration to the U.S. (1820-Present) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Electronics-Lab: How to Scroll a single LCD line – Arduino

R Jordan Kreindler show us how to scroll a single line on a LCD display.

The Liquid Crystal Library has two quite useful functions scrollDisplayLeft() and scrollDisplayRight(). These functions scroll the whole display. That is, they scroll both lines on a 1602 LCD and all four lines on a 2004 LCD. What we often need is the ability to scroll a single line on these displays rather than the whole display. Also, we often want to scroll an entire line off the screen rather than just by one position, as the functions in the Liquid Crystal Library offer. This Instructable provides functions to do just that, and so should be thought of as an addition to the scrollDisplayLeft() and scrollDisplayRight() functions in the Liquid Crystal Library.

How to Scroll a single LCD line – Arduino – [Link]

The post How to Scroll a single LCD line – Arduino appeared first on Electronics-Lab.

Explosm.net: Comic for 2016.06.28

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights): The Human Factor - Hannah Arendt (Encore April 23, 2014)

Fifty years ago, the political philosopher Hannah Arendt published a famous book that created an instant uproar that has never ended. Roger Berkowitz, Adam Gopnik, Rivka Galchen and Adam Kirsch debate the reality behind Hannah Arendt and her ideas.

Disquiet: Three Machines

This is a live set by Dakitanmonkey, aka Tintao, on three machines from the same manufacturer, Elektron. What starts as a sweeping array of low-level textures slowly gains rhythmic activity. (It’s the latest piece I’ve added to my ongoing YouTube playlist of fine “Ambient Performances.”) A place-marker ping is joined by a cycle of sharp static that comes and goes — and, as the half point nears, a steady, downtempo beat kicks in. That beat is enshrouded enough in the thick ambient tones to be perceived as an underlying current rather than a backbeat. Its role is more about taking the pulse of the drone than it is about emphasizing a strict tempo.

Dakitanmonkey describes what he’s up with his three tools (from left to right the Analog Four, the Octatrack, and the Monomachine) to in a brief accompanying note: “Ambient track with deep strings and basses from the Monomachine. Analog four produce only the piano, and the reverb effects for the MnM. Octatrack acts as a mixer, and radical sound change on fader.”

Video posted to the dakitanmonkey YouTube channel. More at his Google+ account.

Penny Arcade: News Post: Professional Courtesy

Tycho: So starved for grist are the infinite screens of the Entertainment Beast that it must churn up the icons of a distant age, consume them, and disgorge them anew.  Most of the time, it doesn’t work.  They’ve fucked up something, or misunderstood something; they take an opportunity to make a tin can telephone between generations and jam it down the shitter.  Occasionally, very occasionally,  you get Voltron: Legendary Defender. When I talk about missed opportunities, The Powerpuff Girls is the first thing that comes to mind.  They’ve completely fucked…

s mazuk: forgotteniowa: Garrison, IowaPopulation: 371“In September 1911,...

















forgotteniowa:

Garrison, Iowa
Population: 371

“In September 1911, the town of Garrison was almost destroyed by fire. A total of twenty-six buildings were burned, of these nineteen were businesses. Garrison never fully recovered from this disaster.”

Quiet Earth: Go Deep into the Mind of Brian De Palma in DE PALMA [Trailer]

Few directors make great adult thrillers as well as Brian De Palma. There's a deeply independent and in some cases, down right creepy, streak to his films and he's managed to keep that spirit alive for decades, sometimes to the detriment of his career. His output over the last 10 years hasn't really matched that of his early career but De Palma keeps pushing the envelope the only way he knows how: by making the movies he wants to make on his own terms.


De Palma, a new documentary from Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow, is being described as a masterclass in movie making by one of the greats. It's essentially De Palma talking about his career for nearly two hours and considering that career includes such classics as Sisters, Carrie, Blow Out, Scarface an [Continued ...]

The Software Freedom Law Center Blog: SFLC represents FOSS developers at the OECD 2016 Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy: Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity

SFLC represents FOSS developers at the OECD 2016 Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy: Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity

Open Culture: Slavoj Žižek Explains the Artistry of Andrei Tarkovsky’s Films: Solaris, Stalker & More

Though a filmmaker of strong personal convictions, artistic and otherwise, Andrei Tarkovsky made films that endure in part because they open themselves to a multiplicity of interpretations. Nothing in the Tarkovsky canon opens itself up to quite such a multiplicity of interpretations as Stalker, which continues to produce fascinating new works derived from their creators’ experience of the film, such as Geoff Dyer’s Zona: A Book About a Film About a Journey to a Room, the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. series of video games, and even a segment of the Slavoj Žižek-starring documentary The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema, which you can watch above.



“We need the excuse of a fiction to stage what they truly are,” declares the philosophical, cultural, and political provocateur over footage of what many consider Tarkovsky’s masterpiece. He describes it as “a film about a ‘Zone,’ a prohibited space where there are debris, remainders of aliens visiting us.” The titular professionals he describes as “people who specialize in smuggling foreigners who want to visit into this space where you get many magical objects.” The ultimate goal of all who make the harrowing journey to the Zone? “The room in the middle of this space, where it is claimed your desires will be realized.”

Not a bad summing-up of the premise of a movie even whose biggest fans struggle to explain. But Žižek, of course, takes his analysis further, bringing in Solaris, Tarkovsky’s 1972 adaptation of Stanislaw Lem’s science fiction novel about a planet that can read the minds of the humans in orbit around it, “an id machine as an object which realizes your nightmares, desires, fears, even before you ask for it.” With Stalker, Tarkovsky envisions the opposite, “a zone where your desires, your deepest wishes, get realized on condition that you are able to formulate them. Which, of course, you are never able.”

If you subscribe to Žižek’s reading of the films, it actually makes perfect sense that they could continue to find new, enthralled audiences: the human relationship to desire remains as fraught as ever — and perhaps has only gained fraughtness as we find ways to satisfy our desires — and both Solaris and Stalker find artistically striking new ways to dramatize it. And according to Žižek, the respected filmmaker also provides a solution: “religious obscurantism,” a “gesture of self-sacrifice” of the kind we see made in his final films, Nostalghia and The Sacrifice. Tarkovsky also sacrificed himself, but for cinema, and so created some of the most formally remarkable motion pictures ever made, ones in which, in Žižek’s words, “we are made to feel this inertia, drabness of time,” and even “the density of time itself.” If you wonder what he means by that, as ever, you’ve just got to experience Tarkovsky for yourself. A number of his major films you can watch free online.

Related Content:

Free Online: Watch the Films of Andrei Tarkovsky, Arguably the Most Respected Filmmaker of All Time

Watch Stalker, Andrei Tarkovsky’s Mind-Bending Masterpiece Free Online

Andrei Tarkovsky’s Masterpiece Stalker Gets Adapted into a Video Game

Andrei Tarkovsky’s Advice to Young Filmmakers: Sacrifice Yourself for Cinema

Slavoj Žižek Names His Favorite Films from The Criterion Collection

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

Slavoj Žižek Explains the Artistry of Andrei Tarkovsky’s Films: Solaris, Stalker & More is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

new shelton wet/dry: Every day, the same, again

Artificially intelligent Russian robot escapes from research lab… again ‘Fellatio cafe’ where customers receive oral sex while they drink their (£40) coffee to be opened in Geneva There are three kinds of pedestrian – which are you? ‘Undead’ genes come alive days after life ends Experiments suggests that humans are able to sense magnetic fields as a kind of [...]

Colossal: Hand-Cut Mandalas and Other Intricate Paper Works by Mr. Riu

Mr.Riu_09

All images via @mr_riu

Japanese artist Mr. Riu takes paper cutting to an intricate extreme, crafting mandalas and elaborate figures with a precision work tool called the swivel knife. This tool allows him to cut curves more fluidly, as the head of the knife can turn 360 degrees. With this movement, Riu produces asymmetrical imagery that is often filled with hidden details—winged horses that sprout from points in a star and snakes that wrap themselves around the eyes of his figural works.

Riu’s captions for his Instagram images are often inspirational and speak to the dedication and patience he has developed during his paper cutting practice. “It’s not that I can do it because I originally have a great patience,” says Riu in one of his captions, “I think that my patience grows stronger gradually because I want to do it.”

You can see more of Mr. Riu’s work on his Instagram and blog.

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Paper Bits: "I sometimes fear… I sometimes fear that people might think that fascism arrives in fancy dress worn..."

I sometimes fear…

I sometimes fear that people might think that fascism arrives in fancy dress worn by grotesques and monsters as played out in endless re-runs of the Nazis. Fascism arrives as your friend. It will restore your honour, make you feel proud, protect your house, give you a job, clean up the neighbourhood, remind you of how great you once were, clear out the venal and the corrupt, remove anything you feel is unlike you…It doesn’t walk in saying, ‘Our programme means militias, mass imprisonments, transportations, war and persecution.’



- Michael Rosen, ‘I sometimes fear…’ Wednesday, 23 April 2014. (via fuckyeahdialectics)

Daniel Lemire's blog: A fast alternative to the modulo reduction

Suppose you want to pick an integer at random in a set of N elements. Your computer has functions to generate random 32-bit integers, how do you transform such numbers into indexes no larger than N? Suppose you have a hash table with a capacity N. Again, you need to transform your hash values (typically 32-bit or 64-bit integers) down to an index no larger than N. Programmers often get around this problem by making sure that N is a power of two, but that is not always ideal.

We want a map that as fair as possible for an arbitrary integer N. That is, ideally, we would want that there are exactly 232/N values mapped to each value in the range {0, 1 ,…, N – 1} when starting from all 232 32-bit integers.

Sadly, we cannot have a perfectly fair map if 232 is not divisible by N. But we can have the next best thing: we can require that there be either floor(232/N) or ceil(232/N) values mapped to each value in the range.

If N is small compared to 232, then this map could be considered as good as perfect.

The common solution is to do a modulo reduction: x mod N. (Since we are computer scientists, we define the modulo reduction to be the remainder of the division, unless otherwise stated.)

uint32_t reduce(uint32_t x, uint32_t N) {
  return x % N;
}

How can I tell that it is fair? Well. Let us just run through the values of x starting with 0. You should be able to see that the modulo reduction takes on the values 0, 1, …, N – 1, 0, 1, … as you increment x. Eventually, x arrives at its last value (232 – 1), at which point the cycle stops, leaving the values 0, 1, …, (232 – 1) mod N with ceil(232/N) occurrences, and the remaining values with floor(232/N) occurrences. It is a fair map with a bias for smaller values.

It works, but a modulo reduction involves a division, and divisions are expensive. Much more expensive than multiplications. A single 32-bit division on a recent x64 processor has a throughput of one instruction every six cycles with a latency of 26 cycles. In contrast, a multiplication has a throughput of one instruction every cycle and a latency of 3 cycles.

There are fancy tricks to “precompute” a modulo reduction so that it can be transformed into a couple of multiplications as well as a few other operations, as long as N is known ahead of time. Your compiler will make use of them if N is known at compile time. Otherwise, you can use a software library or work out your own formula.

But it turns out that you can do even better! That is, there is an approach that is easy to implement, and provides just as good a map, without the same performance concerns.

Assume that x and N are 32-bit integers, consider the 64-bit product x * N. You have that (x * N) div 232 is in the range, and it is a fair map.

uint32_t reduce(uint32_t x, uint32_t N) {
  return ((uint64_t) x * (uint64_t) N) >> 32 ;
}

Computing (x * N) div 232 is very fast on a 64-bit processor. It is a multiplication followed by a shift. On a recent Intel processor, I expect that it has a latency of about 4 cycles and a throughput of at least on call every 2 cycles.

So how fast is our map compared to a 32-bit modulo reduction?

To test it out, I have implemented a benchmark where you repeatedly access random indexes in an array of size N. The indexes are obtained either with a modulo reduction or our approach. On a recent Intel processor (Skylake), I get the following number of CPU cycles per accesses:

modulo reduction fast range
8.1 2.2

So it is four times faster! No bad.

As usual, my code is freely available.

What can this be good for? Well… if you have been forcing your arrays and hash tables to have power-of-two capacities to avoid expensive divisions, you may be able to use the fast range map to support arbitrary capacities without too much of a performance penalty. You can also generate random numbers in a range faster, which matters if you have a very fast random number generator.

So how can I tell that the map is fair?

By multiplying by N, we take integer values in the range [0, 232) and map them to multiples of N in [0, N * 232). By dividing by 232, we map all multiples of N in [0, 232) to 0, all multiples of N in [232, 2 * 232) to one, and so forth. To check that this is fair, we just need to count the number of multiples of N in intervals of length 232. This count must be either ceil(232/N) or floor(232/N).

Suppose that the first value in the interval is a multiple of N: that is clearly the scenario that maximizes the number of multiples in the interval. How many will we find? Exactly ceil(232/N). Indeed, if you draw sub-intervals of length N, then every complete interval begins with a multiple of N and if there is any remainder, then there will be one extra multiple of N. In the worst case scenario, the first multiple of N appears at position N – 1 in the interval. In that case, we get floor(232/N) multiples. To see why, again, draw sub-intervals of length N. Every complete sub-interval ends with a multiple of N.

This completes the proof that the map is fair.

For fun, we can be slightly more precise. We have argued that the number of multiples was maximized when a multiple of N appears at the very beginning of the interval of length 232. At the end, we get an incomplete interval of length 232 mod N. If instead of having the first multiple of N appear at the very beginning of the interval, it appeared at index 232 mod N, then there would not be room for the incomplete subinterval at the end. This means that whenever a multiple of N occurs before 232 mod N, then we shall have ceil(232/N) multiples, and otherwise we shall have floor(232/N) multiples.

Can we tell which outcomes occur with frequency floor(232/N) and which occurs with frequency ceil(232/N)? Yes. Suppose we have an output value k. We need to find the location of the first multiple of N no smaller than k 232. This location is ceil(k 232 / N) Nk 232 which we just need to compare with 232 mod N. If it is smaller, then we have a count of ceil(232/N), otherwise we have a count of floor(232/N).

Further reading: Agner Fog, Pseudo-Random Number Generators for Vector Processors and Multicore Processors, Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods, 2015.

(Update: I have made the proof more intuitive following a comment by Kendall Willets.)

Colossal: The Rescued Film Project Acquires Trove of 1,200 Undeveloped Rolls of 1950s Era Film

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The Rescued Film Project recently made a huge discovery: nearly 66 bundles of film dating from the 1950s. Meticulously labeled and wrapped inside cigar boxes and athletic tape, the treasure trove of photography from a man known only as Paul seems to encompass at least 1,200 undeveloped rolls of film. It’s unclear what would drive a person would take tens of thousands of photographs without any intent to develop the images, but it’s easy to make at least a symbolic comparison to Vivian Maier. A preliminary attempt to develop a roll revealed candid family snapshots of children at home on Christmas while unwrapping presents and playing outside in the snow.

Over the last few years the Rescued Film Project has developed no less than 18,000 images that might have otherwise been lost to time, including an ambitious endeavor to save 31 rolls shot during WWII mentioned here last year. The project is partnering with Blue Moon Camera in Portland to develop the rest of Paul’s film, and the hope is to raise a modest amount of money through donations to help cover costs. You can learn more over on IndieGogo.

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LLVM Project Blog: LLVM Weekly - #130, Jun 27th 2016

Welcome to the one hundred and thirtieth issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects. LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury. Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

If you're reading this on blog.llvm.org then do note this is LAST TIME it will be cross-posted there directly. There is a great effort underway to increase the content on the LLVM blog, and unfortunately LLVM Weekly has the effect of drowning out this content. As ever, you can head to http://llvmweekly.org, subscribe to get it by email, or subscribe to the RSS feed.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.

News and articles from around the web

After recently being taken down due to excessive resource usage, the LLVM apt repositories are now back.

A detailed introduction to ThinLTO has been published on the LLVM blog. This covers the background, design, current status, and usage information for ThinLTO.

A post on Reddit gives a summary of notable language features voted into the C++17 working draft at the Oulu meeting.

On the mailing lists

LLVM commits

  • The new representation for control-flow integrity and virtual call metadata has landed. The commit message further details the problems this change addresses. r273729.

  • The llvm.type.checked.load intrinsic was added. It loads a function pointer from a virtual table pointer using type metadata. r273576.

  • As part of the work on CFL-AA, interprocedural function summaries were added. These avoid recomputation for many properties of a function. r273219, r273596.

  • MemorySSA gained new APIs for PHI creation and MemoryAccess creation. r273295.

  • Metadata attachments are now allowed for declarations. r273336.

  • A new runtimes directory was added to the LLVM tree. r273620.

  • LLVM's dynamic loader gained basic support for COFF ARM. r273682.

Clang commits

  • constexpr if support has been added to Clang. r273602.

  • clang-tidy has a new modernize-use-emplace check that will replace calls of push_back to emplace_back. r273275.

  • The CMake build system for Clang gained a ENABLE_X86_RELAX_RELOCATIONS option. r273224.

Other project commits

  • Basic support for versioned symbols was added to LLD. r273143.

  • LLD now handles both single and double dashes for all options. r273256.

Penny Arcade: Comic: Professional Courtesy

New Comic: Professional Courtesy

SMBC: SMBC - Qualia



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Electronics-Lab: Fuel-gauge ICs help prevent battery clones

265a9c07b25a87d1ac079c6af20915a7

Maxim’s family of ModelGauge m5 standalone fuel gauges provides SHA-256 authentication with a 160-bit secret key to make it harder to clone battery packs. The ICs also implement the ModelGauge m5 algorithm, which converts raw measurements of battery voltage, current, and temperature into accurate state-of-charge (SOC%), absolute capacity (mAhr), time-to-empty, and time-to-full readings. by Susan Nordyk @ end.com:

ModelGauge m5 automatically compensates for cell aging, temperature, and discharge rate. As the battery approaches near empty, ModelGauge m5 invokes an error-correction mechanism that eliminates any error.

The MAX17201 and MAX17211 monitor a single-cell pack, while the MAX17205 and MAX17215 monitor and balance a 2S or 3S pack or monitor a multiple-series cell pack. In addition to high accuracy and age forecasting, the fuel gauges offer low power consumption. The MAX17201 and MAX17211 have a quiescent current of 18 µA when active and 9 µA in hibernate mode. The same specifications for the MAX17205 and MAX17215 are 25 µA and 12 µA, respectively.

Fuel-gauge ICs help prevent battery clones – [Link]

The post Fuel-gauge ICs help prevent battery clones appeared first on Electronics-Lab.

OCaml Planet: Github OCaml jobs: Full Time: Software Developer (Functional Programming) at Jane Street in New York, NY; London, UK; Hong Kong

Software Developer

Jane Street is a proprietary quantitative trading firm, focusing primarily on trading equities and equity derivatives. We use innovative technology, a scientific approach, and a deep understanding of markets to stay successful in our highly competitive field. We operate around the clock and around the globe, employing over 400 people in offices in New York, London and Hong Kong.

The markets in which we trade change rapidly, but our intellectual approach changes faster still. Every day, we have new problems to solve and new theories to test. Our entrepreneurial culture is driven by our talented team of traders and programmers. At Jane Street, we don't come to work wanting to leave. We come to work excited to test new theories, have thought-provoking discussions, and maybe sneak in a game of ping-pong or two. Keeping our culture casual and our employees happy is of paramount importance to us.

We are looking to hire great software developers with an interest in functional programming. OCaml, a statically typed functional programming language with similarities to Haskell, Scheme, Erlang, F# and SML, is our language of choice. We've got the largest team of OCaml developers in any industrial setting, and probably the world's largest OCaml codebase. We use OCaml for running our entire business, supporting everything from research to systems administration to trading systems. If you're interested in seeing how functional programming plays out in the real world, there's no better place.

The atmosphere is informal and intellectual. There is a focus on education, and people learn about software and trading, both through formal classes and on the job. The work is challenging, and you get to see the practical impact of your efforts in quick and dramatic terms. Jane Street is also small enough that people have the freedom to get involved in many different areas of the business. Compensation is highly competitive, and there's a lot of room for growth.

You can learn more about Jane Street and our technology from our main site, janestreet.com. You can also look at a a talk given at CMU about why Jane Street uses functional programming (http://ocaml.janestreet.com/?q=node/61), and our programming blog (http://ocaml.janestreet.com).

We also have extensive benefits, including:

  • 90% book reimbursement for work-related books
  • 90% tuition reimbursement for continuing education
  • Excellent, zero-premium medical and dental insurance
  • Free lunch delivered daily from a selection of restaurants
  • Catered breakfasts and fresh brewed Peet's coffee
  • An on-site, private gym in New York with towel service
  • Kitchens fully stocked with a variety of snack choices
  • Full company 401(k) match up to 6% of salary, vests immediately
  • Three weeks of paid vacation for new hires in the US
  • 16 weeks fully paid maternity/paternity leave for primary caregivers, plus additional unpaid leave

More information at http://janestreet.com/culture/benefits/

New Humanist Blog: Who wants to live forever?

Once the preserve of eccentrics and cranks, cryonics is entering the mainstream. Is eternal life possible – or even desirable?

Planet Haskell: Philip Wadler: Brexit implies Techxit?

In the wake of the EU referendum, there appears to be considerable information about its consequences that many might wish to have seen before the vote. Some of this concerns the negative impact of Brexit on technology firms. Among others, the BBC has a summary.
I was particularly struck by one comment in the story, made by start-up mentor Theo Priestley (pictured above),.
And Mr Priestley thinks that in the event of a Scottish independence referendum that leads to reunification with the EU, it's possible some start-ups could move north of the border, perhaps to rekindle "Silicon Glen" - a 1980s attempt to compete in the semiconductor industry.

Explosm.net: Comic for 2016.06.27

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights): Wit's End, Part 2

What's it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit's end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there's stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.

s mazuk: typosanpo: Pinterest • 世界中のおしゃれアイデアまとめ



typosanpo:

Pinterest • 世界中のおしゃれアイデアまとめ

Planet Haskell: Bryn Keller: Python Class Properties

Class properties are a feature that people coming to Python from other object-oriented languages expect, and expect to be easy. Unfortunately, it’s not. In many cases, you don’t actually want class properties in Python - after all, you can have first class module-level functions as well, you might very well be happier with one of those.

I sometimes see people claim that you can’t do class properties at all in Python, and that’s not right either. It can be done, and it’s not too bad. Read on!

I’m going to assume here that you already know what class (sometimes called “static”) properties are in languages like Java, and that you’re somewhat familiar with Python metaclasses.

To make this feature work, we have to use a metaclass. In this example, we’ll suppose that we want to be able to access a list of all the instances of our class, as well as reference to the most recently created instance. It’s artificial, but it gives us a reason to have both read-only and read-write properties. We define a metaclass, which is again a class that extends type.


class Extent(type):
    @property
    def extent(self):
        ext = getattr(self, '_extent', None)
        if ext is None:
            self._extent = []
            ext = self._extent
        return ext
        
    @property
    def last_instance(self):
        return getattr(self, '_last_instance', None)
        
    @last_instance.setter
    def last_instance(self, value):
        self._last_instance = value
        

Please note that if you want to do something like this for real, you may well need to protect access to these shared class properties with synchronization tools like RLock and friends to prevent different threads from overwriting each others’ work willy-nilly.

Next we create a class that uses that metaclass. The syntax is different in Python 2.7, so you may need to adjust if you’re working in an older version.

class Thing(object, metaclass=Extent):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__class__.extent.append(self)
        self.__class__.last_instance = self
        

Another note for real code: these references (the extent and the last_instance) will keep your object from being garbage collected, so if you actually want to keep extents for your classes, you should do so using something like weakref.

Now we can try out our new class:


>>> t1 = Thing()
>>> t2 = Thing()
>>> Thing.extent
[<__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d080>, <__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d2b0>]
>>> Thing.last_instance
<__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d2b0>
>>> 

Great, we have what we wanted! There are a couple of things to remember, though:

  • Class properties are inherited!
  • Class properties are not accessible via instances, only via classes.

Let’s see an example that demonstrates both. Suppose we add a new subclass of Thing called SuperThing:

>>> class SuperThing(Thing):
...     @property
...     def extent(self):
...             return self.__class__.extent
... 
>>> s = SuperThing()

See how we created a normal extent property that just reads from the class property? So we can now do this:

>>> s.extent
[<__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d080>, <__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d2b0>, <__main__.SuperThing object at 0x101c5d2e8>]

Whereas if we were to try that with one of the original Things, it wouldn’t work:

>>> t1.extent
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'Thing' object has no attribute 'extent'

We can of course still access either one via classes:

>>> t1.__class__.extent
[<__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d080>, <__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d2b0>, <__main__.SuperThing object at 0x101c5d2e8>]
>>> s.__class__.extent
[<__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d080>, <__main__.Thing object at 0x101c5d2b0>, <__main__.SuperThing object at 0x101c5d2e8>]
>>> 

Also note that the extent for each of these classes is the same, which shows that class properties are inherited.

Did you spot the bug in Thing? It only manifests when we have subclasses like SuperThing. We inherited the __init__ from Thing, which adds each new instance to the extent, and sets last_instance. In this case, self.__class__.extent was already initialized, on Thing, and so we added our SuperThing to the existing list. For last_instance, however, we assigned directly, rather than first reading and appending, as we did with the list property, and so SuperThing.last_instance will be our s, and Thing.last_instance will be our t2. Tread carefully, it’s easy to make a mistake with this kind of thing!

Hopefully this has been a (relatively) simple example of how to build your own class properties, with or without setters.

s mazuk: Video



Trivium: 26jun2016

OCaml Planet: OCaml Labs compiler hacking: Fourteenth OCaml compiler hacking evening at Citrix

​Our summer compiler hacking event will be hosted by Euan and the Citrix Team on Thursday 7th​ July — come and explore the other side of Cambridge and the Science Park!

If you're planning to come along, it'd be helpful if you could indicate interest via Doodle and sign up to the mailing list to receive updates.

Where: Citrix Systems Research & Development Ltd.
Building 10​1, ​ Cambridge
Science Park​,
Milton Road​,
Cambridge​
CB4 0FY​

When: 7pm, Thursday 7th July

Who: anyone interested in improving OCaml. Knowledge of OCaml programming will obviously be helpful, but prior experience of working on OCaml internals isn't necessary.

What: fixing bugs, implementing new features, learning about OCaml internals

Refreshments: pizza and beer/other drinks will be available.

Wiki: https://github.com/ocamllabs/compiler-hacking/wiki

We're defining "compiler" pretty broadly, to include anything that's part of the standard distribution, which means at least the standard library, runtime, tools (ocamldep, ocamllex, ocamlyacc, etc.), the debugger, the documentation, and the compiler itself. We'll have suggestions for mini-projects for various levels of experience, but feel free to come along and work on whatever you fancy.

Quiet Earth: EIFF 2016: Kevin Smith's YOGA HOSERS Reviewed!

Here’s a list of things you can do to make your film completely critic-proof: 1) Base it on an idea so inherently silly that anyone attempting to take it seriously either looks like a complete tool or a killjoy. 2) Credit it as an homage to ‘80s late-night horror comedy so that you can plausibly claim that it’s supposed to be crappy. 3) Cast your family in it so that anyone complaining about the acting is just ‘getting personal’ or even worse, ‘being a bully’. 4) Use the film to make fun of film critics, this way any negative criticism looks like a pathetic tantrum from some feeble-minded, limp-wristed, damp-eyed so-called intellectual. You simply can’t lose!

I’m not a big Kevin Smith fan, but I’m definitely not a hater either. [Continued ...]

OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS: While discussing another massive purchase... (From the OVC Archive!)

Only 12 days left to get The Complete OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS! Check it out on Kickstarter!

SMBC: SMBC - Zoo Math



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Planet Haskell: Dominic Steinitz: Ecology, Dynamical Systems and Inference via PMMH

Introduction

In the 1920s, Lotka (1909) and Volterra (1926) developed a model of a very simple predator-prey ecosystem.

\displaystyle   \begin{aligned}  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_1}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & \rho_1 N_1  - c_1 N_1 N_2 \label{eq2a} \\  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_2}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & c_2 N_1 N_2 - \rho_2 N2 \label{eq2b}  \end{aligned}

Although simple, it turns out that the Canadian lynx and showshoe hare are well represented by such a model. Furthermore, the Hudson Bay Company kept records of how many pelts of each species were trapped for almost a century, giving a good proxy of the population of each species.

We can capture the fact that we do not have a complete model by describing our state of ignorance about the parameters. In order to keep this as simple as possible let us assume that log parameters undergo Brownian motion. That is, we know the parameters will jiggle around and the further into the future we look the less certain we are about what values they will have taken. By making the log parameters undergo Brownian motion, we can also capture our modelling assumption that birth, death and predation rates are always positive. A similar approach is taken in Dureau, Kalogeropoulos, and Baguelin (2013) where the (log) parameters of an epidemiological model are taken to be Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes (which is biologically more plausible although adds to the complexity of the model, something we wish to avoid in an example such as this).

Andrieu, Doucet, and Holenstein (2010) propose a method to estimate the parameters of such models (Particle Marginal Metropolis Hastings aka PMMH) and the domain specific probabilistic language LibBi (Murray (n.d.)) can be used to apply this (and other inference methods).

For the sake of simplicity, in this blog post, we only model one parameter as being unknown and undergoing Brownian motion. A future blog post will consider more sophisticated scenarios.

A Dynamical System Aside

The above dynamical system is structurally unstable (more on this in a future post), a possible indication that it should not be considered as a good model of predator–prey interaction. Let us modify this to include carrying capacities for the populations of both species.

\displaystyle   \begin{aligned}  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_1}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & \rho_1 N_1 \bigg(1 - \frac{N_1}{K_1}\bigg) - c_1 N_1 N_2 \\  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_2}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & -\rho_2 N_2 \bigg(1 + \frac{N_2}{K_2}\bigg) + c_2 N_1 N_2  \end{aligned}

Data Generation with LibBi

Let’s generate some data using LibBi.

// Generate data assuming a fixed growth rate for hares rather than
// e.g. a growth rate that undergoes Brownian motion.

model PP {
  const h         = 0.1;    // time step
  const delta_abs = 1.0e-3; // absolute error tolerance
  const delta_rel = 1.0e-6; // relative error tolerance

  const a  = 5.0e-1 // Hare growth rate
  const k1 = 2.0e2  // Hare carrying capacity
  const b  = 2.0e-2 // Hare death rate per lynx
  const d  = 4.0e-1 // Lynx death rate
  const k2 = 2.0e1  // Lynx carrying capacity
  const c  = 4.0e-3 // Lynx birth rate per hare

  state P, Z       // Hares and lynxes
  state ln_alpha   // Hare growth rate - we express it in log form for
                   // consistency with the inference model
  obs P_obs        // Observations of hares

  sub initial {
    P ~ log_normal(log(100.0), 0.2)
    Z ~ log_normal(log(50.0), 0.1)
  }

  sub transition(delta = h) {
    ode(h = h, atoler = delta_abs, rtoler = delta_rel, alg = 'RK4(3)') {
      dP/dt =  a * P * (1 - P / k1) - b * P * Z
      dZ/dt = -d * Z * (1 + Z / k2) + c * P * Z
    }
  }

  sub observation {
    P_obs ~ log_normal(log(P), 0.1)
  }
}

We can look at phase space starting with different populations and see they all converge to the same fixed point.

Data Generation with Haskell

Since at some point in the future, I plan to produce Haskell versions of the methods given in Andrieu, Doucet, and Holenstein (2010), let’s generate the data using Haskell.

> {-# OPTIONS_GHC -Wall                     #-}
> {-# OPTIONS_GHC -fno-warn-name-shadowing  #-}
> module LotkaVolterra (
>     solLv
>   , solPp
>   , h0
>   , l0
>   , baz
>   , logBM
>   , eulerEx
>   )where
> import Numeric.GSL.ODE
> import Numeric.LinearAlgebra
> import Data.Random.Source.PureMT
> import Data.Random hiding ( gamma )
> import Control.Monad.State

Here’s the unstable model.

> lvOde :: Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          [Double] ->
>          [Double]
> lvOde rho1 c1 rho2 c2 _t [h, l] =
>   [
>     rho1 * h - c1 * h * l
>   , c2 * h * l - rho2 * l
>   ]
> lvOde _rho1 _c1 _rho2 _c2 _t vars =
>   error $ "lvOde called with: " ++ show (length vars) ++ " variable"
> rho1, c1, rho2, c2 :: Double
> rho1 = 0.5
> c1 = 0.02
> rho2 = 0.4
> c2 = 0.004
> deltaT :: Double
> deltaT = 0.1
> solLv :: Matrix Double
> solLv = odeSolve (lvOde rho1 c1 rho2 c2)
>                  [50.0, 50.0]
>                  (fromList [0.0, deltaT .. 50])

And here’s the stable model.

> ppOde :: Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          Double ->
>          [Double] ->
>          [Double]
> ppOde a k1 b d k2 c _t [p, z] =
>   [
>     a * p * (1 - p / k1) - b * p * z
>   , -d * z * (1 + z / k2) + c * p * z
>   ]
> ppOde _a _k1 _b _d _k2 _c _t vars =
>   error $ "ppOde called with: " ++ show (length vars) ++ " variable"
> a, k1, b, d, k2, c :: Double
> a = 0.5
> k1 = 200.0
> b = 0.02
> d = 0.4
> k2 = 50.0
> c = 0.004
> solPp :: Double -> Double -> Matrix Double
> solPp x y = odeSolve (ppOde a k1 b d k2 c)
>                  [x, y]
>                  (fromList [0.0, deltaT .. 50])
> gamma, alpha, beta :: Double
> gamma = d / a
> alpha = a / (c * k1)
> beta  = d / (a * k2)
> fp :: (Double, Double)
> fp = ((gamma + beta) / (1 + alpha * beta), (1 - gamma * alpha) / (1 + alpha * beta))
> h0, l0 :: Double
> h0 = a * fst fp / c
> l0 = a * snd fp / b
> foo, bar :: Matrix R
> foo = matrix 2 [a / k1, b, c, negate d / k2]
> bar = matrix 1 [a, d]
> baz :: Maybe (Matrix R)
> baz = linearSolve foo bar

This gives a stable fixed point of

ghci> baz
  Just (2><1)
   [ 120.00000000000001
   ,               10.0 ]

Here’s an example of convergence to that fixed point in phase space.

The Stochastic Model

Let us now assume that the Hare growth parameter undergoes Brownian motion so that the further into the future we go, the less certain we are about it. In order to ensure that this parameter remains positive, let’s model the log of it to be Brownian motion.

\displaystyle   \begin{aligned}  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_1}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & \rho_1 N_1 \bigg(1 - \frac{N_1}{K_1}\bigg) - c_1 N_1 N_2 \\  \frac{\mathrm{d}N_2}{\mathrm{d}t} & = & -\rho_2 N_2 \bigg(1 + \frac{N_2}{K_2}\bigg) + c_2 N_1 N_2 \\  \mathrm{d} \rho_1 & = & \rho_1 \sigma_{\rho_1} \mathrm{d}W_t  \end{aligned}

where the final equation is a stochastic differential equation with W_t being a Wiener process.

By Itô we have

\displaystyle   \mathrm{d} (\log{\rho_1}) = - \frac{\sigma_{\rho_1}^2}{2} \mathrm{d} t + \sigma_{\rho_1} \mathrm{d}W_t

We can use this to generate paths for \rho_1.

\displaystyle   \rho_1(t + \Delta t) = \rho_1(t)\exp{\bigg(- \frac{\sigma_{\rho_1}^2}{2} \Delta t + \sigma_{\rho_1} \sqrt{\Delta t} Z\bigg)}

where Z \sim {\mathcal{N}}(0,1).

> oneStepLogBM :: MonadRandom m => Double -> Double -> Double -> m Double
> oneStepLogBM deltaT sigma rhoPrev = do
>   x <- sample $ rvar StdNormal
>   return $ rhoPrev * exp(sigma * (sqrt deltaT) * x - 0.5 * sigma * sigma * deltaT)
> iterateM :: Monad m => (a -> m a) -> m a -> Int -> m [a]
> iterateM f mx n = sequence . take n . iterate (>>= f) $ mx
> logBMM :: MonadRandom m => Double -> Double -> Int -> Int -> m [Double]
> logBMM initRho sigma n m =
>   iterateM (oneStepLogBM (recip $ fromIntegral n) sigma) (return initRho) (n * m)
> logBM :: Double -> Double -> Int -> Int -> Int -> [Double]
> logBM initRho sigma n m seed =
>   evalState (logBMM initRho sigma n m) (pureMT $ fromIntegral seed)

We can see the further we go into the future the less certain we are about the value of the parameter.

Using this we can simulate the whole dynamical system which is now a stochastic process.

> f1, f2 :: Double -> Double -> Double ->
>           Double -> Double ->
>           Double
> f1 a k1 b p z = a * p * (1 - p / k1) - b * p * z
> f2 d k2 c p z = -d * z * (1 + z / k2) + c * p * z
> oneStepEuler :: MonadRandom m =>
>                 Double ->
>                 Double ->
>                 Double -> Double ->
>                 Double -> Double -> Double ->
>                 (Double, Double, Double) ->
>                 m (Double, Double, Double)
> oneStepEuler deltaT sigma k1 b d k2 c (rho1Prev, pPrev, zPrev) = do
>     let pNew = pPrev + deltaT * f1 (exp rho1Prev) k1 b pPrev zPrev
>     let zNew = zPrev + deltaT * f2 d k2 c pPrev zPrev
>     rho1New <- oneStepLogBM deltaT sigma rho1Prev
>     return (rho1New, pNew, zNew)
> euler :: MonadRandom m =>
>          (Double, Double, Double) ->
>          Double ->
>          Double -> Double ->
>          Double -> Double -> Double ->
>          Int -> Int ->
>          m [(Double, Double, Double)]
> euler stateInit sigma k1 b d k2 c n m =
>   iterateM (oneStepEuler (recip $ fromIntegral n) sigma k1 b d k2 c)
>            (return stateInit)
>            (n * m)
> eulerEx :: (Double, Double, Double) ->
>            Double -> Int -> Int -> Int ->
>            [(Double, Double, Double)]
> eulerEx stateInit sigma n m seed =
>   evalState (euler stateInit sigma k1 b d k2 c n m) (pureMT $ fromIntegral seed)

We see that the populations become noisier the further into the future we go.

Notice that the second order effects of the system are now to some extent captured by the fact that the growth rate of Hares can drift. In our simulation, this is demonstrated by our decreasing lack of knowledge the further we look into the future.

Inference

Now let us infer the growth rate using PMMH. Here’s the model expressed in LibBi.

// Infer growth rate for hares

model PP {
  const h         = 0.1;    // time step
  const delta_abs = 1.0e-3; // absolute error tolerance
  const delta_rel = 1.0e-6; // relative error tolerance

  const a  = 5.0e-1 // Hare growth rate - superfluous for inference
                    // but a reminder of what we should expect
  const k1 = 2.0e2  // Hare carrying capacity
  const b  = 2.0e-2 // Hare death rate per lynx
  const d  = 4.0e-1 // Lynx death rate
  const k2 = 2.0e1  // Lynx carrying capacity
  const c  = 4.0e-3 // Lynx birth rate per hare

  state P, Z       // Hares and lynxes
  state ln_alpha   // Hare growth rate - we express it in log form for
                   // consistency with the inference model
  obs P_obs        // Observations of hares
  param mu, sigma  // Mean and standard deviation of hare growth rate
  noise w          // Noise

  sub parameter {
    mu ~ uniform(0.0, 1.0)
    sigma ~ uniform(0.0, 0.5)
  }

  sub proposal_parameter {
     mu ~ truncated_gaussian(mu, 0.02, 0.0, 1.0);
     sigma ~ truncated_gaussian(sigma, 0.01, 0.0, 0.5);
   }

  sub initial {
    P ~ log_normal(log(100.0), 0.2)
    Z ~ log_normal(log(50.0), 0.1)
    ln_alpha ~ gaussian(log(mu), sigma)
  }

  sub transition(delta = h) {
    w ~ normal(0.0, sqrt(h));
    ode(h = h, atoler = delta_abs, rtoler = delta_rel, alg = 'RK4(3)') {
      dP/dt =  exp(ln_alpha) * P * (1 - P / k1) - b * P * Z
      dZ/dt = -d * Z * (1 + Z / k2) + c * P * Z
      dln_alpha/dt = -sigma * sigma / 2 - sigma * w / h
    }
  }

  sub observation {
    P_obs ~ log_normal(log(P), 0.1)
  }
}

Let’s look at the posteriors of the hyper-parameters for the Hare growth parameter.

The estimate for \mu is pretty decent. For our generated data, \sigma =0 and given our observations are quite noisy maybe the estimate for this is not too bad also.

Appendix: The R Driving Code

All code including the R below can be downloaded from github but make sure you use the straight-libbi branch and not master.

install.packages("devtools")
library(devtools)
install_github("sbfnk/RBi",ref="master")
install_github("sbfnk/RBi.helpers",ref="master")

rm(list = ls(all.names=TRUE))
unlink(".RData")

library('RBi')
try(detach(package:RBi, unload = TRUE), silent = TRUE)
library(RBi, quietly = TRUE)

library('RBi.helpers')

library('ggplot2', quietly = TRUE)
library('gridExtra', quietly = TRUE)

endTime <- 50

PP <- bi_model("PP.bi")
synthetic_dataset_PP <- bi_generate_dataset(endtime=endTime,
                                            model=PP,
                                            seed="42",
                                            verbose=TRUE,
                                            add_options = list(
                                                noutputs=500))

rdata_PP <- bi_read(synthetic_dataset_PP)

df <- data.frame(rdata_PP$P$nr,
                 rdata_PP$P$value,
                 rdata_PP$Z$value,
                 rdata_PP$P_obs$value)

ggplot(df, aes(rdata_PP$P$nr, y = Population, color = variable), size = 0.1) +
    geom_line(aes(y = rdata_PP$P$value, col = "Hare"), size = 0.1) +
    geom_line(aes(y = rdata_PP$Z$value, col = "Lynx"), size = 0.1) +
    geom_point(aes(y = rdata_PP$P_obs$value, col = "Observations"), size = 0.1) +
    theme(legend.position="none") +
    ggtitle("Example Data") +
    xlab("Days") +
    theme(axis.text=element_text(size=4),
          axis.title=element_text(size=6,face="bold")) +
    theme(plot.title = element_text(size=10))
ggsave(filename="diagrams/LVdata.png",width=4,height=3)

synthetic_dataset_PP1 <- bi_generate_dataset(endtime=endTime,
                                             model=PP,
                                             init = list(P = 100, Z=50),
                                             seed="42",
                                             verbose=TRUE,
                                             add_options = list(
                                                 noutputs=500))

rdata_PP1 <- bi_read(synthetic_dataset_PP1)

synthetic_dataset_PP2 <- bi_generate_dataset(endtime=endTime,
                                             model=PP,
                                             init = list(P = 150, Z=25),
                                             seed="42",
                                             verbose=TRUE,
                                             add_options = list(
                                                 noutputs=500))

rdata_PP2 <- bi_read(synthetic_dataset_PP2)

df1 <- data.frame(hare = rdata_PP$P$value,
                  lynx = rdata_PP$Z$value,
                  hare1 = rdata_PP1$P$value,
                  lynx1 = rdata_PP1$Z$value,
                  hare2 = rdata_PP2$P$value,
                  lynx2 = rdata_PP2$Z$value)

ggplot(df1) +
    geom_path(aes(x=df1$hare,  y=df1$lynx, col = "0"), size = 0.1) +
    geom_path(aes(x=df1$hare1, y=df1$lynx1, col = "1"), size = 0.1) +
    geom_path(aes(x=df1$hare2, y=df1$lynx2, col = "2"), size = 0.1) +
    theme(legend.position="none") +
    ggtitle("Phase Space") +
    xlab("Hare") +
    ylab("Lynx") +
    theme(axis.text=element_text(size=4),
          axis.title=element_text(size=6,face="bold")) +
    theme(plot.title = element_text(size=10))
ggsave(filename="diagrams/PPviaLibBi.png",width=4,height=3)

PPInfer <- bi_model("PPInfer.bi")

bi_object_PP <- libbi(client="sample", model=PPInfer, obs = synthetic_dataset_PP)

bi_object_PP$run(add_options = list(
                     "end-time" = endTime,
                     noutputs = endTime,
                     nsamples = 4000,
                     nparticles = 128,
                     seed=42,
                     nthreads = 1),
                 ## verbose = TRUE,
                 stdoutput_file_name = tempfile(pattern="pmmhoutput", fileext=".txt"))

bi_file_summary(bi_object_PP$result$output_file_name)

mu <- bi_read(bi_object_PP, "mu")$value
g1 <- qplot(x = mu[2001:4000], y = ..density.., geom = "histogram") + xlab(expression(mu))
sigma <- bi_read(bi_object_PP, "sigma")$value
g2 <- qplot(x = sigma[2001:4000], y = ..density.., geom = "histogram") + xlab(expression(sigma))
g3 <- grid.arrange(g1, g2)
ggsave(plot=g3,filename="diagrams/LvPosterior.png",width=4,height=3)


df2 <- data.frame(hareActs = rdata_PP$P$value,
                  hareObs  = rdata_PP$P_obs$value)

ggplot(df, aes(rdata_PP$P$nr, y = value, color = variable)) +
    geom_line(aes(y = rdata_PP$P$value, col = "Phyto")) +
    geom_line(aes(y = rdata_PP$Z$value, col = "Zoo")) +
    geom_point(aes(y = rdata_PP$P_obs$value, col = "Phyto Obs"))

ln_alpha <- bi_read(bi_object_PP, "ln_alpha")$value

P <- matrix(bi_read(bi_object_PP, "P")$value,nrow=51,byrow=TRUE)
Z <- matrix(bi_read(bi_object_PP, "Z")$value,nrow=51,byrow=TRUE)

data50 <- bi_generate_dataset(endtime=endTime,
                              model=PP,
                              seed="42",
                              verbose=TRUE,
                              add_options = list(
                                  noutputs=50))

rdata50 <- bi_read(data50)

df3 <- data.frame(days = c(1:51), hares = rowMeans(P), lynxes = rowMeans(Z),
                                  actHs = rdata50$P$value, actLs = rdata50$Z$value)


ggplot(df3) +
    geom_line(aes(x = days, y = hares, col = "Est Phyto")) +
    geom_line(aes(x = days, y = lynxes, col = "Est Zoo")) +
    geom_line(aes(x = days, y = actHs, col = "Act Phyto")) +
    geom_line(aes(x = days, y = actLs, col = "Act Zoo"))

Bibliography

Andrieu, Christophe, Arnaud Doucet, and Roman Holenstein. 2010. “Particle Markov chain Monte Carlo methods.” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series B: Statistical Methodology 72 (3): 269–342. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9868.2009.00736.x.

Dureau, Joseph, Konstantinos Kalogeropoulos, and Marc Baguelin. 2013. “Capturing the time-varying drivers of an epidemic using stochastic dynamical systems.” Biostatistics (Oxford, England) 14 (3): 541–55. doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxs052.

Lotka, Alfred J. 1909. “Contribution to the Theory of Periodic Reactions.” The Journal of Physical Chemistry 14 (3): 271–74. doi:10.1021/j150111a004.

Murray, Lawrence M. n.d. “Bayesian State-Space Modelling on High-Performance Hardware Using LibBi.”

Volterra, Vito. 1926. “Variazioni e fluttuazioni del numero d’individui in specie animali conviventi.” Memorie Della R. Accademia Dei Lincei 6 (2): 31–113. http://www.liberliber.it/biblioteca/v/volterra/variazioni{\_}e{\_}fluttuazioni/pdf/volterra{\_}variazioni{\_}e{\_}fluttuazioni.pdf.


Explosm.net: Comic for 2016.06.26

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic

Paper Bits: "A former LAPD officer turned sociologist (Cooper 1991) observed that the overwhelming majority of..."

“A former LAPD officer turned sociologist (Cooper 1991) observed that the overwhelming majority of those beaten by police turn out not to be guilty of any crime. “Cops don’t beat up burglars”, he observed. The reason, he explained, is simple: the one thing most guaranteed to evoke a violent reaction from police is to challenge their right to “define the situation.” If what I’ve been saying is true this is just what we’d expect. The police truncheon is precisely the point where the state’s bureaucratic imperative for imposing simple administrative schema, and its monopoly of coercive force, come together. It only makes sense then that bureaucratic violence should consist first and foremost of attacks on those who insist on alternative schemas or interpretations. At the same time, if one accepts Piaget’s famous definition of mature intelligence as the ability to coordinate between multiple perspectives (or possible perspectives) one can see, here, precisely how bureaucratic power, at the moment it turns to violence, becomes literally a form of infantile stupidity.”

-

David Graeber, Dead Zones of the Imagination (via antoine-roquentin)

the one thing most guaranteed to evoke a violent reaction from police is to challenge their right to “define the situation.”

(via brideofelmerseason)

s mazuk: nickkahler: Gaetano Pesce, Organic Building, Osaka, Japan, c....





















nickkahler:

Gaetano Pesce, Organic Building, Osaka, Japan, c. 1989-91

Disquiet: The Wire Magazine on the Disquiet Junto

Many thanks to Lottie Brazier, who wrote a piece about the Disquiet Junto for the “Unofficial Channels” column in the current issue of The Wire magazine (July 2016, the one with Loren Connors on the cover). I especially appreciate that she put in print a comment by Ethan Hein that I’ve long thought captures part of the essence of the Junto (“He writes reviews of music that doesn’t exist yet and then gets internet strangers to make it”), and for emphasizing my sense of “ambient participation” and how I connect it to the child-development concept of “parallel play.”

I’m hopeful the Wire coverage of the Junto will introduce it to a new batch of potential participants. She also quotes Richard Fair on, among other things, the weekly aspect of the Junto as part of its utility. And she singles out a track by Detritus Tabu from the 0028 project.

Here is the piece:

p1

p2

p3

More from the Wire at twitter.com/LottieBrazier and the Wire at thewire.co.uk.

SMBC: SMBC - Office Work



New comic!

Today's News:

 Hey Australia! Only a few days left to submit for BAHFest Sydney!

Explosm.net: Comic for 2016.06.25

New Cyanide and Happiness Comic

Penny Arcade: News Post: Hideocalypse

Tycho: I am mostly Kojima adjacent as a gamer.  I feel strongly that I need to be aware of his movement and current location, like when you see a spider in the house; it’s worthwhile to reserve a few cycles to store this data.  I love to watch other people play them, and the strangeness - whatever might be said in the strip - is important.  Not just where it is in his work, in its own context, but because of the people it inspires to see the state of play and be like, you know what?  Fuck all that. I’m always trying to know people via their work.  It’s an…

Quiet Earth: SWISS ARMY MAN is Odd and Ambitious [Review]

Sarah, one of the few characters in Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert's (AKA Daniels) debut feature Swiss Army Man puts it best when, in the movie's final scene, she looks incredulously at the scene which just unfolded before her and asks "What the fuck?"


Until the debut of Swiss Army Man, Daniels were best known for their music videos and commercials, all of which feature the pair's unique sense of comedy and visual style. Much to their benefit or detriment – depending on where you fall on their style – their feature film is exactly what one might expect from the pair of filmmakers: audacious, touching, sometimes hilarious and after [Continued ...]

OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS: Probably a very long time... (From the OVC Archive!)

Check out The Complete OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS on Kickstarter!

explodingdog: Up at Building a World. only a few of each.Wish for Something...













Up at Building a World. only a few of each.

Wish for Something Better (2001)

New Job (2002)

Thinking of You (2004)

Thinking of You, 2nd Edition (2005)

Explodingdog 2001 (2006)


all published by explodingdog back in the day.


also, some new drawings up.

SMBC: SMBC - A Joke



New comic!

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We set up an event page! All the info is there. If you're attending, please say so :) 

OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS: 100% FUNDED!

The Complete OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS is 100%funded! Amazing! This book is happening! Thank you all so much for backing this campaign and helping me make The Complete OVC a reality. I couldn't have done it without you! And there are still 2 weeks left of the Kickstarter! I’ll be adding new rewards and stretch goals right up until the end and remember, this is the ONLY place to pre-order The Complete OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS! So if you haven’t yet, CHECK IT OUT!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/173804573/the-complete-our-valued-customers

Penny Arcade: Comic: Hideocalypse

New Comic: Hideocalypse

new shelton wet/dry: How the world appears to us in certain forms imposed by our brains

Is our perceptual experience a veridical representation of the world or is it a product of our beliefs and past experiences? Cognitive penetration describes the influence of higher level cognitive factors on perceptual experience and has been a debated topic in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. { Consciousness and Cognition | Continue reading } photo [...]

churchturing.org / 2016-06-29T00:10:52